82

I have a component that will sometimes need to be rendered as an <anchor> and other times as a <div>. The prop I read to determine this, is this.props.url.

If it exists, I need to render the component wrapped in an <a href={this.props.url}>. Otherwise it just gets rendered as a <div/>.

Possible?

This is what I'm doing right now, but feel it could be simplified:

if (this.props.link) {
    return (
        <a href={this.props.link}>
            <i>
                {this.props.count}
            </i>
        </a>
    );
}

return (
    <i className={styles.Icon}>
        {this.props.count}
    </i>
);

UPDATE:

Here is the final lockup. Thanks for the tip, @Sulthan!

import React, { Component, PropTypes } from 'react';
import classNames from 'classnames';

export default class CommentCount extends Component {

    static propTypes = {
        count: PropTypes.number.isRequired,
        link: PropTypes.string,
        className: PropTypes.string
    }

    render() {
        const styles = require('./CommentCount.css');
        const {link, className, count} = this.props;

        const iconClasses = classNames({
            [styles.Icon]: true,
            [className]: !link && className
        });

        const Icon = (
            <i className={iconClasses}>
                {count}
            </i>
        );

        if (link) {
            const baseClasses = classNames({
                [styles.Base]: true,
                [className]: className
            });

            return (
                <a href={link} className={baseClasses}>
                    {Icon}
                </a>
            );
        }

        return Icon;
    }
}
  • You can also move const baseClasses = into that if (this.props.link) branch. As you are using ES6, so you can also simplify a bit by const {link, className} = this.props; and then using link and className as local variables. – Sulthan Nov 14 '15 at 17:36
  • Man, I love it. Learning more and more about ES6 and it always just improves readability. Thanks for the extra tip! – Brandon Durham Nov 14 '15 at 17:47
  • 1
    What's a "final lockup"? – Chris Harrison Jan 14 '19 at 14:13
90

Just use a variable.

var component = (
    <i className={styles.Icon}>
       {this.props.count}
    </i>
);

if (this.props.link) {
    return (
        <a href={this.props.link} className={baseClasses}>
            {component}
        </a>
    );
}

return component;

or, you can use a helper function to render the contents. JSX is code like any other. If you want to reduce duplications, use functions and variables.

| improve this answer | |
21

Create a HOC (higher-order component) for wrapping your element:

const WithLink = ({ link, className, children }) => (link ?
  <a href={link} className={className}>
    {children}
  </a>
  : children
);

return (
  <WithLink link={this.props.link} className={baseClasses}>
    <i className={styles.Icon}>
      {this.props.count}
    </i>
  </WithLink>
);
| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    HOC should die slowly :P – Jamie Hutber Oct 18 '19 at 10:59
  • The term HOC is hideous. It is merely a function that's placed in the middle. I really displace this suddenly trendy name "HPC". what is so high-order about a simple function that's placed in between...old concept for decades. – vsync Jul 1 at 10:29
12

Here's an example of a helpful component I've seen used (not sure who to accredit it to) that does the job:

const ConditionalWrap = ({ condition, wrap, children }) => (
  condition ? wrap(children) : children
);

Use case:

<ConditionalWrap condition={someCondition}
  wrap={children => (<a>{children}</a>)} // Can be anything
>
  This text is passed as the children arg to the wrap prop
</ConditionalWrap>
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    Credit should likely go here: gist.github.com/kitze/23d82bb9eb0baabfd03a6a720b1d637f – Roy Prins Nov 19 '19 at 16:05
  • I saw that from kitze. But I wasn't sure he got the idea from someone else – antony Nov 20 '19 at 14:40
  • Neither am I. This was the first result that popped up and I assumed it to be the source - or at least closer to it ;). – Roy Prins Nov 22 '19 at 21:46
  • You should use the wrap declaratively and not as a function to keep things more "React"-spirit – vsync Jul 1 at 10:32
  • How would you make it more declarative @vsync? I thought render props were within the spirit of React? – antony Jul 1 at 12:12
9

There's another way you could use a reference variable

let Wrapper = React.Fragment //fallback in case you dont want to wrap your components

if(someCondition) {
    Wrapper = ParentComponent
}

return (
    <Wrapper parentProps={parentProps}>
        <Child></Child>
    </Wrapper>

)
| improve this answer | |
  • You can condense the first half to let Wrapper = someCondition ? ParentComponent : React.Fragment – mpoisot Apr 10 at 22:09
  • This is awesome, but sometimes you want to keep the code declarative, meaning it returns only JSX – vsync Jul 1 at 11:54
  • I get an error React.Fragment can only have 'key' and 'children' because I pass some props to "<Wrapper>" like "className" and so – vsync Jul 1 at 14:28
  • @vsync you need to add a condition for props as well something like propId={someCondition? parentProps: undefined} .. – Avinash Jul 1 at 16:33
  • 1
    I know :) I was writing this for the sake of documentation for others who come here with this issue, so Google will cache this page in its search results for those keywords – vsync Jul 1 at 16:46
1

You could also use a util function like this:

const wrapIf = (conditions, content, wrapper) => conditions
        ? React.cloneElement(wrapper, {}, content)
        : content;
| improve this answer | |
0

You should use a JSX if-else as described here. Something like this should work.

App = React.creatClass({
    render() {
        var myComponent;
        if(typeof(this.props.url) != 'undefined') {
            myComponent = <myLink url=this.props.url>;
        }
        else {
            myComponent = <myDiv>;
        }
        return (
            <div>
                {myComponent}
            </div>
        )
    }
});
| improve this answer | |
-1

A functional component which renders 2 components, one is wrapped and the other isn't.

Method 1:

// The interesting part:
const WrapIf = ({ condition, With, children, ...rest }) => 
  condition 
    ? <With {...rest}>{children}</With> 
    : children

 
    
const Wrapper = ({children, ...rest}) => <h1 {...rest}>{children}</h1>


// demo app: with & without a wrapper
const App = () => [
  <WrapIf condition={true} With={Wrapper} style={{color:"red"}}>
    foo
  </WrapIf>
  ,
  <WrapIf condition={false} With={Wrapper}>
    bar
  </WrapIf>
]

ReactDOM.render(<App/>, document.body)
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react/16.6.3/umd/react.production.min.js"></script>
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react-dom/16.6.3/umd/react-dom.production.min.js"></script>

This can also be used like this:

<WrapIf condition={true} With={"h1"}>

Method 2:

// The interesting part:
const Wrapper = ({ condition, children, ...props }) => condition 
  ? <h1 {...props}>{children}</h1>
  : <React.Fragment>{children}</React.Fragment>;   
    // stackoverflow prevents using <></>
  

// demo app: with & without a wrapper
const App = () => [
  <Wrapper condition={true} style={{color:"red"}}>
    foo
  </Wrapper>
  ,
  <Wrapper condition={false}>
    bar
  </Wrapper>
]

ReactDOM.render(<App/>, document.body)
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react/16.6.3/umd/react.production.min.js"></script>
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react-dom/16.6.3/umd/react-dom.production.min.js"></script>

| improve this answer | |

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