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i have abstract class (class "father") and son class

i want to write on the father the operator << and implemnt it on the son

here the code

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

class father {
    virtual friend ostream& operator<< (ostream & out, father &obj) = 0;

};

class son: public father  {
    friend ostream& operator<< (ostream & out, son &obj)
    {
        out << "bla bla";
        return out;
    }
};
void main()
{
    son obj;
    cout << obj;

}

i get 3 error

Error 3 error C2852 : 'operator <<' : only data members can be initialized within a class

Error 2 error C2575 : 'operator <<' : only member functions and bases can be virtual

Error 1 error C2254 : '<<' : pure specifier or abstract override specifier not allowed on friend function

what i can do please?

3
  • Global functions cannot be pure virtual. Nov 14, 2015 at 17:53
  • so what can i do if i want on the header write the "<<" ?? you know , the header include all the "header of the function" that i want to omplement on the son....
    – dani1999
    Nov 14, 2015 at 17:56
  • You might provide a protected pure virtual function std::ostream& put(std::ostream& os) const = 0; and a global function friend ostream& operator<< (ostream & out, father &obj) utilizing it. Note that friend relationships aren't inherited. Nov 14, 2015 at 18:02

1 Answer 1

1

Although you cannot make an operator virtual, you can make them call a regular virtual function, like this:

class father {
    virtual ostream& format(ostream & out, father &obj) = 0;
    friend ostream& operator<< (ostream & out, father &obj) {
        return format(out, obj);
    }
};

class son: public father  {
    virtual ostream& format(ostream & out, son &obj) {
        out << "bla bla";
        return out;
    }
};

There is only one operator << now, but each subclass of father can provide its own implementation by overriding the virtual member function format.

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