105

It appears that I have data in the format of a list of NumPy arrays (type() = np.ndarray):

[array([[ 0.00353654]]), array([[ 0.00353654]]), array([[ 0.00353654]]), 
array([[ 0.00353654]]), array([[ 0.00353654]]), array([[ 0.00353654]]), 
array([[ 0.00353654]]), array([[ 0.00353654]]), array([[ 0.00353654]]), 
array([[ 0.00353654]]), array([[ 0.00353654]]), array([[ 0.00353654]]),
array([[ 0.00353654]])]

I am trying to put this into a polyfit function:

m1 = np.polyfit(x, y, deg=2)

However, it returns the error: TypeError: expected 1D vector for x

I assume I need to flatten my data into something like:

[0.00353654, 0.00353654, 0.00353654, 0.00353654, 0.00353654, 0.00353654 ...]

I have tried a list comprehension which usually works on lists of lists, but this as expected has not worked:

[val for sublist in risks for val in sublist]

What would be the best way to do this?

4

5 Answers 5

118

You could use numpy.concatenate, which as the name suggests, basically concatenates all the elements of such an input list into a single NumPy array, like so -

import numpy as np
out = np.concatenate(input_list).ravel()

If you wish the final output to be a list, you can extend the solution, like so -

out = np.concatenate(input_list).ravel().tolist()

Sample run -

In [24]: input_list
Out[24]: 
[array([[ 0.00353654]]),
 array([[ 0.00353654]]),
 array([[ 0.00353654]]),
 array([[ 0.00353654]]),
 array([[ 0.00353654]]),
 array([[ 0.00353654]]),
 array([[ 0.00353654]]),
 array([[ 0.00353654]]),
 array([[ 0.00353654]]),
 array([[ 0.00353654]]),
 array([[ 0.00353654]]),
 array([[ 0.00353654]]),
 array([[ 0.00353654]])]

In [25]: np.concatenate(input_list).ravel()
Out[25]: 
array([ 0.00353654,  0.00353654,  0.00353654,  0.00353654,  0.00353654,
        0.00353654,  0.00353654,  0.00353654,  0.00353654,  0.00353654,
        0.00353654,  0.00353654,  0.00353654])

Convert to list -

In [26]: np.concatenate(input_list).ravel().tolist()
Out[26]: 
[0.00353654,
 0.00353654,
 0.00353654,
 0.00353654,
 0.00353654,
 0.00353654,
 0.00353654,
 0.00353654,
 0.00353654,
 0.00353654,
 0.00353654,
 0.00353654,
 0.00353654]
3
  • 1
    by doing so, I get ValueError: all the input array dimensions except for the concatenation axis must match exactly
    – Athena
    Commented Feb 11, 2018 at 12:09
  • 2
    @Athena Post a new question please. It's not clear what exactly is the data format.
    – Divakar
    Commented Feb 11, 2018 at 12:36
  • @Athena I think I had the same issue: it's because the arrays in the list have different shapes. I was able to get a flattened array using: np.concatenate(input_list, axis=None).ravel() Commented Apr 15, 2022 at 5:23
20

Can also be done by

np.array(list_of_arrays).flatten().tolist()

resulting in

[0.00353654, 0.00353654, 0.00353654, 0.00353654, 0.00353654, 0.00353654, 0.00353654, 0.00353654, 0.00353654, 0.00353654, 0.00353654, 0.00353654, 0.00353654]

Update

As @aydow points out in the comments, using numpy.ndarray.ravel can be faster if one doesn't care about getting a copy or a view

np.array(list_of_arrays).ravel()

Although, according to docs

When a view is desired in as many cases as possible, arr.reshape(-1) may be preferable.

In other words

np.array(list_of_arrays).reshape(-1)

The initial suggestion of mine was to use numpy.ndarray.flatten that returns a copy every time which affects performance.

Let's now see how the time complexity of the above-listed solutions compares using perfplot package for a setup similar to the one of the OP

import perfplot

perfplot.show(
    setup=lambda n: np.random.rand(n, 2),
    kernels=[lambda a: a.ravel(),
             lambda a: a.flatten(),
             lambda a: a.reshape(-1)],
    labels=['ravel', 'flatten', 'reshape'],
    n_range=[2**k for k in range(16)],
    xlabel='N')

enter image description here

Here flatten demonstrates piecewise linear complexity which can be reasonably explained by it making a copy of the initial array compare to constant complexities of ravel and reshape that return a view.

It's also worth noting that, quite predictably, converting the outputs .tolist() evens out the performance of all three to equally linear.

4
  • np.flatten works, but it's worth noting that it's significantly slower than np.ravel. this difference gets worse as the array length increases
    – aydow
    Commented Jun 12, 2019 at 0:27
  • @aydow hmm, how so? np.flatten is indeed slower but not significantly. I just %%timeit both on list(map(np.array, np.random.rand(1_000_000, 10))) and np.concatenate(list_of_arrays).ravel() takes 290 ms ± 2.49 ms against np.array(list_of_arrays).flatten()'s 446 ms ± 26.5 ms with both performing seemingly instantaneously without %%timeit on my laptop.
    – ayorgo
    Commented Jun 12, 2019 at 11:34
  • hi @ayorgo, i'm deviating slightly from the OP question. i'm assuming an np.array of np.arrays (which pertained to my own question) rather than a list of np.arrays. using just np.ravel takes 249 ns ± 8.43 ns while using just np.flatten takes 25.4 ms ± 244 µs!! adding np.concatenate and np.array slows it down to the numbers you've mentioned. apologies for not specifying this in my initial comment
    – aydow
    Commented Jun 13, 2019 at 0:47
  • @aydow haha, indeed! What I believe makes such a difference in performance is that np.flatten always returns a copy unlike 'np.ravel' (stackoverflow.com/a/28930580/4755520). The interesting thing also is that the accepted answer doesn't need to use np.concatenate. Simply converting to np.array and .ravel() would suffice.
    – ayorgo
    Commented Jun 13, 2019 at 6:32
6

Another way using itertools for flattening the array:

import itertools

# Recreating array from question
a = [np.array([[0.00353654]])] * 13

# Make an iterator to yield items of the flattened list and create a list from that iterator
flattened = list(itertools.chain.from_iterable(a))

This solution should be very fast, see https://stackoverflow.com/a/408281/5993892 for more explanation.

If the resulting data structure should be a numpy array instead, use numpy.fromiter() to exhaust the iterator into an array:

# Make an iterator to yield items of the flattened list and create a numpy array from that iterator
flattened_array = np.fromiter(itertools.chain.from_iterable(a), float)

Docs for itertools.chain.from_iterable(): https://docs.python.org/3/library/itertools.html#itertools.chain.from_iterable

Docs for numpy.fromiter(): https://docs.scipy.org/doc/numpy/reference/generated/numpy.fromiter.html

5

Another simple approach would be to use numpy.hstack() followed by removing the singleton dimension using squeeze() as in:

In [61]: np.hstack(list_of_arrs).squeeze()
Out[61]: 
array([0.00353654, 0.00353654, 0.00353654, 0.00353654, 0.00353654,
       0.00353654, 0.00353654, 0.00353654, 0.00353654, 0.00353654,
       0.00353654, 0.00353654, 0.00353654])
3

I came across this same issue and found a solution that combines 1-D numpy arrays of variable length:

np.column_stack(input_list).ravel()

See numpy.column_stack for more info.

Example with variable-length arrays with your example data:

In [135]: input_list
Out[135]: 
[array([[ 0.00353654,  0.00353654]]),
 array([[ 0.00353654]]),
 array([[ 0.00353654]]),
 array([[ 0.00353654,  0.00353654,  0.00353654]])]

In [136]: [i.size for i in input_list]    # variable size arrays
Out[136]: [2, 1, 1, 3]

In [137]: np.column_stack(input_list).ravel()
Out[137]: 
array([ 0.00353654,  0.00353654,  0.00353654,  0.00353654,  0.00353654,
        0.00353654,  0.00353654])

Note: Only tested on Python 2.7.12

2
  • I tried this and got ValueError: all the input array dimensions except for the concatenation axis must match exactly :(
    – Shir
    Commented May 2, 2019 at 9:20
  • I was able to make it work using np.hstack instead of np.column_stack. I think this is because my arrays are 1d, and I didn't read the original question carefully enough. Thanks anyway :)
    – Shir
    Commented May 2, 2019 at 9:30

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