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So I've been learning OpenGL 3.3 on https://open.gl/ and I got really confused about some stuff.

  1. VAO-s. By my understanding they are used to store the glVertexAttribPointer calls.
  2. VBO-s. They store vertecies. So if I am making something with multiple objects do I need a VBO for every object?
  3. Shader Programs - Why do we need multiple ones and what exactly do they do ?
  4. What exactly does this line do : glBindFragDataLocation(shaderProgram, 0, "outColor");

The most important thing is how does all of this fit into a big program? For what exactly are used the VAO-s? Most tutorials just cover the things just to drawing a cube or 2 with hard coded vertices, so how would one go to managing scenes with a lot of objects? I've read this thread and got a little bit of understanding on how the scene management happens and all but still I can't figure out how to connect the OpenGL stuff to it all.

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1-Yes. VAOs store vertex array bindings in general. When you see that you're doing lots of calls that does enabling, disabling and changing of GPU states, you can do all that at some early point in the program and then use VAOs to take a "snapshot" ,of what is bound and what isn't, at that point in time. Later, during your actual draw calls, all you need to do is bind that VAO again to set all the vertex states to what they were then. Just like how VBOs are faster that immediate mode because they send all vertices at once, VAOs work faster by changing many vertex states at once.

2-VBOs are just another way to send your glPosition, glColor..etc coordinates to the GPU to render on screen. The idea is, unlike with immediate mode where you send your vertex data one by one with the gl*Attribute* calls, is to upload all your vertices to the GPU in advance and retrieve their location as an ID. At time of rendering, you're only going to point the GPU (you bind the VBO id to something like GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, and use glVertexAttribPointer to specify details of how you stored the vertices data) to that location and issue your order to render. That obviously saves lots of time by doing things overhead, and so it's much faster.

As for whether one should have one VBO per object or even one VBO for all the objects is up to the programmer and the structure of the objects they want to render. After all, VBOs themselves are just a bunch of data you stored in the GPU, and you tell the computer how they're arranged using the glVertexAttribPointer calls.

3-Shaders are used to define a pipeline - a routine - of what happens to the vertices, colors, normals..etc after they've been sent to the GPU until they're rendered as fragments or pixels on the screen. When you send vertices over to the GPU, they're often still 3D coordinates, but the screen is a 2D sheet of pixels. There still comes the process of re-positioning these vertices according to the ProjectionModelView matrices (job of vertex shader) and then "flattening" or rasterizing the 3D geometry (geometry shader) into a 2D plane. Then it follows with coloring the flattened 2D scene (fragment shader) and finally lighting the pixels on your screen accordingly. In OpenGL versions 1.5 core and below, you didn't have much control over those stages as it was all fixed (hence the term fixed pipeline). Just think about what you could do in any of these shader stages and you will see that there is a lot of awesome things you can do with them. For example, in the fragment shader, just before you send the fragment color to the GPU, negate the sign of the color and add 1 to have colors of objects rendered with that shader inverted!

As for how many shaders one needs to use, again, it's up to the programmer to decide whether to have many or not. They could merge all the functionalities they need into one big giant shader (uber shader) and switch these functionalities on and off with boolean uniforms (very often considered as a bad practice), or have every shader do a certain thing and bind the right one according to what they need.

What exactly does this line do : glBindFragDataLocation(shaderProgram, 0, "outColor");

It means that whatever is stored in the out declared variable "outColor" at the end of the fragment shader execution will be sent to the GPU as the final primary fragment color.

The most important thing is how does all of this fit into a big program? For what exactly are used the VAO-s? Most tutorials just cover the things just to drawing a cube or 2 with hard coded vertices, so how would one go to managing scenes with a lot of objects? I've read this thread and got a little bit of understanding on how the scene management happens and all but still I can't figure out how to connect the OpenGL stuff to it all.

They all work together to draw your nice colored shapes on the screen. VBOs are the structures where the vertices of your scene are stored (all aligned in an ugly fashion), VertexAttribPointer calls to tell the GPU how the data in the VBO is arranged, VAOs to store all these VertexAttribPointer instructions ahead of time and send them all at once with simply binding one during rendering in your main loop, and shaders to give you more control during the process of drawing your scene on the screen.

All of this can sound overwhelming at first, but with practice you will get used to it.

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  • Thanks, A LOT for that amazing answer! Most of it got much clearer now. Maybe one more little question. Do you know of some little projects or tasks that could be fun to make so I get a better grasp on everything ? – Rokner Nov 15 '15 at 15:53
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    I don't know, but maybe a little game project if that's what you enjoy doing. For starters, you can use OpenGL's immediate mode (glBegin(), glEnd()) to render your graphics. Then as you progress, try converting those calls to modern OpenGL VBOs and stuff, and then learn glm (GLmath; an excellent maths library that will make things easier for you) and try out shaders. – Aiman Al-Eryani Nov 15 '15 at 16:04
  • Thanks again! I will probably make some very little games to understand these things. – Rokner Nov 15 '15 at 16:18

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