Given this code in JavaScript:

function getFunc(){
    var myVar = 1;
    function inc(var1) {
        myVar = myVar + 1;
        return var1 + myVar;
    }
    return inc;
}
var inc = getFunc();
console.log(inc(5));
console.log(inc(6));

If you run this code in your browser console it gives you 7 and 9 as the result. I wrote the same code in C# and it gave me the same result:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    var inc = GetAFunc();
    Console.WriteLine(inc(5));
    Console.WriteLine(inc(6));

    Console.ReadKey();
}

public static Func<int, int> GetAFunc()
{
    var myVar = 1;
    Func<int, int> inc = delegate(int var1)
    {
        myVar = myVar + 1;
        return var1 + myVar;
    };
    return inc;
}

But why doesn't it give the same result in PHP?

function getFunc() {
    $myVar = 1;

    $inc = function($var1) use ($myVar) {
        $myVar = $myVar + 1;
        return $var1 + $myVar;
    };

    return $inc;
}

$inc = getFunc();
echo $inc(5);
echo $inc(6);

It gave me 7 and 8!

Why they don't work the same way? Is something wrong with the code?

  • I would call this 'unexpected' instead of 'weird' ;) – moorscode Nov 15 '15 at 14:09
  • 1
    Although this is an interesting theoretical question, I'd say that none of your examples are very clear in communicating the code's intent. – Sven Nov 15 '15 at 14:10
up vote 9 down vote accepted

This is due to the fact you need to be explicit in PHP if you'd like to modify a variable in another scope. You can do this by defining $var as a reference with &. For example: use (&$var).

The following code will give you your expected behaviour:

function test() {
  $var = 1;

  $inc = function($num) use (&$var) {
      var_dump($var);
    $var = $var + 1;
    return $num + $var;
  };

  return $inc;
}

$test = test();
echo $test(5);
echo $test(6);

Hope this helps :) x

  • 1
    I'm afraid your comment does not explicitly says what is the main difference. In other languages like C# and JavaScript closures inherits function scope (all variables declared in function scope). In PHP closure inherits only object scope ($this). If he would change $var on $this->var code would work as expected. Obviously to use variable from function scope solution is what you have written - using reference because it's primitive. But this is because use does not declare which variables should be passed to scope but rather tells which variables should be copied to closure. – takwlasnie Nov 15 '15 at 21:51

By default, PHP passes the function arguments by value and so the original variable will not be changed.

You can change this behaviour by prepending an ampersand to the variable name in the function:

function test() {
  $var = 1;

  $inc = function($num) use (&$var) {
    ++$var;
    return $num + $var;
  };

  return $inc;
}

$test = test();
echo $test(5);
echo $test(6);

You have to pass $var as reference to your subfunction, using the ampersand

  $inc = function($num) use (&$var) {

You can also make a static variable inside your closure instead of the creator. This gives the expected results 7 and 9.

<?php

function test() {
    $inc = function($num) {
        static $var = 1;
        $var = $var + 1;
        return $num + $var;
    };

    return $inc;
}

$test = test();
echo $test(5);
echo $test(6);

All the other answers are right: PHP will pass-by-value the variable in use unless you make it a pass-by-reference.

Here are some authoritative examples from the PHP documentation:

http://php.net/manual/en/functions.anonymous.php

Example 3:

$message = 'hello';

// Inherit by-reference
$example = function () use (&$message) {
    var_dump($message);
};
echo $example();

It doesn't do very much though.

Example 4:

public function getTotal($tax)
{
    $total = 0.00;

    $callback =
        function ($quantity, $product) use ($tax, &$total)
        {
            $pricePerItem = constant(__CLASS__ . "::PRICE_" .
                strtoupper($product));
            $total += ($pricePerItem * $quantity) * ($tax + 1.0);
        };

    array_walk($this->products, $callback);
    return round($total, 2);
}

The top voted comment on this page also mentions that people will forget the pass-by-value behavior: http://php.net/manual/en/functions.anonymous.php#99287

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