184

While traversing a graph in Python, a I'm receiving this error:

'dict' object has no attribute 'has_key'

Here is my code:

def find_path(graph, start, end, path=[]):
    path = path + [start]
    if start == end:
        return path
    if not graph.has_key(start):
        return None
    for node in graph[start]:
        if node not in path:
            newpath = find_path(graph, node, end, path)
            if newpath: return newpath
    return None

The code aims to find the paths from one node to others. Code source: http://cs.mwsu.edu/~terry/courses/4883/lectures/graphs.html

Why am I getting this error and how can I fix it?

1

6 Answers 6

271

has_key was removed in Python 3. From the documentation:

  • Removed dict.has_key() – use the in operator instead.

Here's an example:

if start not in graph:
    return None
4
  • 1
    I think key not in d.keys() is probably much slower, too, since key not in d should be O(1) lookup and I believe keys produces a list, which is O(n) lookup (not to mention taking extra space in memory). I could be wrong about that though -- it might still be hashed lookup
    – Adam Smith
    Nov 16, 2015 at 2:55
  • 3
    @AdamSmith not in Python 3, d.keys() is a view that implements most of the set interface. Jan 24, 2017 at 16:24
  • 3
    It removed... but why ? Since it make python 2 port to python 3 more work to do.
    – 林果皞
    Aug 8, 2018 at 15:59
  • 1
    @林果皞: The whole point of a new major version is that the developers can introduce improvements which may include breaking changes instead of having to support old features as the language matures. This is always a risk which must be considered before upgrading to a new major version. In this case, in is shorter and more Pythonic, as well as being consistent with other collections in the language.
    – johnnyRose
    Aug 8, 2018 at 16:26
51

In python3, has_key(key) is replaced by __contains__(key)

Tested in python3.7:

a = {'a':1, 'b':2, 'c':3}
print(a.__contains__('a'))
1
  • I think this is the right and easier way to do, Thank you for the answer
    – KK2491
    Jan 19 at 17:29
29

has_key has been deprecated in Python 3.0. Alternatively you can use 'in'

graph={'A':['B','C'],
   'B':['C','D']}

print('A' in graph)
>> True

print('E' in graph)
>> False
7

I think it is considered "more pythonic" to just use in when determining if a key already exists, as in

if start not in graph:
    return None
1
  • 1
    I'm not sure, according to The Zen of Python(PEP 20): "Explicit is better than implicit". I think that if you use the in keyword, your intention might not be clear enough what does if start not in graph: means? may be graph is a list and it checks if there is no such string in the list? On the other hand, if you use syntax like has_key (now deprecated) or at least in graph.keys() it is more clear that graph is a dict May 21, 2020 at 20:09
6

Try:

if start not in graph:

For more info see ProgrammerSought

4

The whole code in the document will be:

graph = {'A': ['B', 'C'],
             'B': ['C', 'D'],
             'C': ['D'],
             'D': ['C'],
             'E': ['F'],
             'F': ['C']}
def find_path(graph, start, end, path=[]):
        path = path + [start]
        if start == end:
            return path
        if start not in graph:
            return None
        for node in graph[start]:
            if node not in path:
                newpath = find_path(graph, node, end, path)
                if newpath: return newpath
        return None

After writing it, save the document and press F 5

After that, the code you will run in the Python IDLE shell will be:

find_path(graph, 'A','D')

The answer you should receive in IDLE is

['A', 'B', 'C', 'D'] 
1
  • Can you please explain it ?specifically the recursion portion.
    – Encipher
    Mar 7, 2019 at 20:07

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