11

The example function:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION update_a_table(id int, name text)
RETURNS void AS $$
BEGIN
    UPDATE a_table 
    SET name = name
    WHERE id = id;
END;
$$ LANGUAGE plpgsql;

cause this error:

ERROR:  column reference "name" is ambiguous
LINE 2:   SET name = name
                     ^
DETAIL:  It could refer to either a PL/pgSQL variable or a table column.

It is clear that I can correct this by changing the names of arguments. Is there any alternative solution?

1
  • 1
    Changing the name of the argument is the only sensible solution to this problem.
    – user330315
    Commented Nov 17, 2015 at 6:49

3 Answers 3

23

Generally it is a bad practice in programming to use the same name for two different objects. You should not do it and the change of the arguments names is the best solution. However, Postgres leaves the door open (for the compatibility with older versions). You can set the configuration parameter:

set plpgsql.variable_conflict to use_variable;

Possible values of the parameter: error (default), use_variable or use_column.

It is also possible to set the parameter only for a given function:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION update_a_table(id int, name text)
RETURNS void AS $$
#variable_conflict use_variable
BEGIN
    UPDATE a_table 
    SET name = name
    WHERE id = id;
END;
$$ LANGUAGE plpgsql;

Alternatively, you can explicitly qualify ambiguous names, which is a better solution than the above one. The qualified names are of the shape <function_name>.<parameter_name>, for example update_a_table.id.

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION update_a_table(id int, name text)
RETURNS void AS $$
BEGIN
    UPDATE a_table 
    SET name = update_a_table.name
    WHERE a_table.id = update_a_table.id;
END;
$$ LANGUAGE plpgsql;
8
  • 2
    I am sorry, but disabling variable_conflict isn't good idea (not without STRONG WARNING). The solution should be using qualified names always. Commented Nov 17, 2015 at 4:24
  • 1
    @PavelStehule - Thank you, I have added two words about it.
    – klin
    Commented Nov 17, 2015 at 9:34
  • 1
    Second solution is not working for me. ERROR: missing FROM-clause entry for table "update_a_table"
    – JustRandom
    Commented Dec 26, 2017 at 19:42
  • @DominikK - ask a question with a sample data and your query. You can use SqlFiddle to show the problem.
    – klin
    Commented Dec 26, 2017 at 21:49
  • 2
    @EleanorHolley - that is a misunderstanding. There is no <schema_name> in the qualified names, you should use <function_name> instead. See the updated answer.
    – klin
    Commented Jan 17, 2022 at 23:30
7

This error is safer against to terribly difficult detectable bugs. The PLpgSQL good style requires

  1. using qualified names everywhere in any embedded SQL - for access to function's parameters use a pattern function_name.parameter_name

  2. previous versions of Postgres didn't this detection, and only one protection was using variables with special prefix. Usually is used '_' as prefix. The rule is simple - when your function contains embedded SQL, then all of the variable and parameter names should start with '_'. This is safer against name collision and it increase a readability, because you can see quickly what is a variable and what is a SQL identifier.

2
  • I'm afraid I do not quite understand. Where can I find information about special prefixes? And what is an embedded SQL?
    – markasz
    Commented Nov 17, 2015 at 4:33
  • the prefix '_' isn't special - it is usually used - postgres.cz/wiki/PL/… . Lot of recommendations are shared with Oracle's PL/SQL. Embedded SQL is any SQL statement used in PLpgSQL as first class object (the integral part of language). Commented Nov 17, 2015 at 5:02
1
CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION update_a_table_1(int,text)
RETURNS void AS $$
BEGIN
    UPDATE a_table 
    SET name = $2
    WHERE id =$1;
END;
$$ LANGUAGE plpgsql;

You can create a function w/o specifying argument(s) name, in your case you have 2 args so you just need to access them by providing its index ($1 and $2) but IMO its not a good idea when you have many args to pass(for example a function with 10 or 10+ args it may confuse you)

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