2

For a collaborative filtering application, I need to compare each observation in a data.table to a weighted average of every other observation (excluding itself) in its group. For example:

library('data.table')
ex <- function(n){ # example data
  set.seed(123)
  data.table(id = 1:n,
             grp = sample(LETTERS[1:3], n, replace = TRUE),
             wt = sample.int(10, n, replace = TRUE),
             x = sample.int(100, n, replace = TRUE) )[order(grp),]
}
(d <- ex(10))
#     id grp wt   x
#  1:  1   A 10  89
#  2:  6   A  9  71
#  3:  3   B  7  65
#  4:  7   B  3  55
#  5:  9   B  4  29
#  6: 10   B 10  15
#  7:  2   C  5  70
#  8:  4   C  6 100
#  9:  5   C  2  66
# 10:  8   C  1  60

I imagine there is an arithmetic approach that would just let me do weighted average by group and then "back out" the individual observation out of the average. However, I wonder whether there is a clever data.table way to treat it as a self-join to a weighted average of members of the same grp with different id.

I figured out how to do it in dplyr using full_join():

library('dplyr') 
d <- ex(10)
unique(
  subset(data.table(full_join(d, d, by='grp')), 
         id.x != id.y)[, .(grp, x = x.x, wt=wt.x, 
                           rest_of_grp_wtd_avg = sum(wt.y * x.y) / sum(wt.y)),
                       by=.(id = id.x)][order(grp, id),]
) # produces desired result
#    id grp   x wt rest_of_grp_wtd_avg
# 1:  1   A  89 10            71.00000
# 2:  6   A  71  9            89.00000
# 3:  3   B  65  7            25.35294
# 4:  7   B  55  3            34.33333
# 5:  9   B  29  4            38.50000
# 6: 10   B  15 10            52.57143
# 7:  2   C  70  5            88.00000
# 8:  4   C 100  6            67.75000
# 9:  5   C  66  2            84.16667
#10:  8   C  60  1            83.23077

However, since full_join returns a plain data.frame, and because I couldn't make it work without unique(), I imagine that it wouldn't be as efficient at scale as a good data.table solution.

As an aside, sqldf (edit: now) works:

library('sqldf')
sqldf('select a.*, 
  sum(b.wt * b.x) / sum(b.wt) as rest_of_grp_wtd_avg
  from d as a
  left outer join d as b on a.grp = b.grp and a.id <> b.id
  group by a.id') # returns the desired solution

I did get a pure data.table solution to work, but it's kind of ugly even by data.table standards:

setkey(d,id)
merge(d[CJ(d$id, id2 = d$id),][id != id2, ],
      d, by.x = c('id2','grp'), by.y=c('id','grp')
      )[order(grp, id), .(rest_of_grp_wtd_avg = sum(wt.y * x.y) / sum(wt.y)), 
        by=.(id, grp, wt=wt.x, x=x.x)] # returns desired result

What is the most elegant syntax for this computation?

  • 1
    The SQL in the questionj is incorrect, not non-standard. Try: sqldf("select a.*, (sum_wtx - wt * x + 0.0) / (sum_wt - wt) rest from d a join ( select grp, sum(wt) sum_wt, sum(wt * x) sum_wtx from d group by grp) b using (grp)") or with the PostgreSQL backend and it's window functions it is even easier: library(RPostgreSQL); sqldf("select *, ((sum(wt * x) over (partition by grp)) - wt * x + 0.0) / ((sum(wt) over (partition by grp)) - wt) rest from d") – G. Grothendieck Nov 17 '15 at 15:06
  • @G.Grothendieck thanks for your comment. I fixed the group by on the sqldf self-join, now it works. I understand that in this example, using arithmetic with the full self-join can replace the more complex partial self-join. The postgres suggestion is helpful. – C8H10N4O2 Nov 17 '15 at 15:30
3

I think you are overcomplicating things. Adding a new variable with the average of the other observations per group is done perfectly well by your formula rest_of_grp_wtd_avg = (sum(wt*x)-wt*x) / (sum(wt)-wt). You only need to add it to d by reference with the := operator. For a pure `data.table solution you can shorten your code to:

d[, rest_of_grp_wtd_avg := (sum(wt*x)-wt*x) / (sum(wt)-wt), grp]

which gives:

> d
    id grp wt   x rest_of_grp_wtd_avg
 1:  1   A 10  89            71.00000
 2:  6   A  9  71            89.00000
 3:  3   B  7  65            25.35294
 4:  7   B  3  55            34.33333
 5:  9   B  4  29            38.50000
 6: 10   B 10  15            52.57143
 7:  2   C  5  70            88.00000
 8:  4   C  6 100            67.75000
 9:  5   C  2  66            84.16667
10:  8   C  1  60            83.23077

This is the same as your result:

> all.equal(d, res)
[1] TRUE

Where res is constructed by:

setkey(d,id)
res <- merge(d[CJ(d$id, id2 = d$id),][id != id2, ],
             d, by.x = c('id2','grp'), by.y=c('id','grp'))[order(grp, id), .(rest_of_grp_wtd_avg = sum(wt.y * x.y) / sum(wt.y)), 
                                                           by=.(id, grp, wt=wt.x, x=x.x)]

An example for when you want to exclude some rows:

d[id < 9, rest_of_grp_wtd_avg := (sum(wt*x)-wt*x) / (sum(wt)-wt), grp]

which gives:

> d
    id grp wt   x rest_of_grp_wtd_avg
 1:  1   A 10  89            71.00000
 2:  6   A  9  71            89.00000
 3:  3   B  7  65            55.00000
 4:  7   B  3  55            65.00000
 5:  9   B  4  29                  NA
 6: 10   B 10  15                  NA
 7:  2   C  5  70            88.00000
 8:  4   C  6 100            67.75000
 9:  5   C  2  66            84.16667
10:  8   C  1  60            83.23077
| improve this answer | |
  • This solution relies on d as a data.table. With d as a plain R dataframe, you need grouping functionality from either a package (eg. dplyr ) or tapply. – MarkusN Nov 17 '15 at 12:41
  • @MarkusN d is a data.table (see the question); when d is a data.frame you can replace d with setDT(d) – Jaap Nov 17 '15 at 12:51
  • 2
    @MarkusN this should be pretty obvious as question was tagged with data.table. You should note you can do setDT(df); do_dt_job(df); setDF(df) without any extra cost as set* from data.table works efficiently without copy of data. – jangorecki Nov 17 '15 at 12:52
  • Thanks for this answer. I agree that the arithmetic solution -- backing the individual contribution out of the weighted average -- is the simplest approach given the example I provided. I was looking for a way to do the partial self-join in case there were other reasons I would want to exclude rows in relation to the current one. Perhaps one of the usual data.table suspects (Frank, Eddi, MattDowle) will take the bait on this. If nobody does, I'll accept your answer. – C8H10N4O2 Nov 17 '15 at 15:53
  • @C8H10N4O2 If you want to exclude some rows, there is still no need for a (partial) self-join in my opinion. You can just express the desired filter in i (see the added example). You only need a join if you want to filter d by values of another data.table. – Jaap Nov 17 '15 at 16:33
1

There is no need for a self-join. with dplyr's capability for window functions you can calculate measures per group quite easily:

ex(10) %>%
    group_by(grp) %>%
    mutate(rest_of_grp_wtd_avg = (sum(wt*x)-wt*x) / (sum(wt)-wt))
| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    the capability for window functions is not a specific capability of dplyr, it's more a general capability within R ....... – Jaap Nov 17 '15 at 9:35

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