After you train a model in Tensorflow:

  1. How do you save the trained model?
  2. How do you later restore this saved model?
  • Were you able to restore variables used in inception model? I am also trying the exact same problem but I am unable to write set of variables that were used while training the inception model (of which I have ckpt file) – Sangram Oct 11 '16 at 17:52
  • I haven't tried with the inception model. Do you have the model's network structure with its names? You have to replicate the network and then load the weights and biases (the ckpt file) as Ryan explains. Maybe something has changed since Nov'15 and there's a more straightforward approach now, I'm not sure – mathetes Oct 11 '16 at 18:22
  • Ohh okay. I have loaded other pre-trained tensorflow models previously but was looking for variable specifications of inception model. Thanks. – Sangram Oct 11 '16 at 18:30
  • 1
    If you restore to continue to train, just use the Saver checkpoints. If you save the model to do reference, just the tensorflow SavedModel APIs. – HY G Dec 20 '17 at 9:28

15 Answers 15

up vote 23 down vote accepted

New and shorter way: simple_save

Many good answer, for completeness I'll add my 2 cents: simple_save. Also a standalone code example using the tf.data.Dataset API.

Python 3 ; Tensorflow 1.7

import tensorflow as tf
from tensorflow.python.saved_model import tag_constants

with tf.Graph().as_default():
    with tf.Session as sess:
        ...

        # Saving
        inputs = {
            "batch_size_placeholder": batch_size_placeholder,
            "features_placeholder": features_placeholder,
            "labels_placeholder": labels_placeholder,
        }
        outputs = {"prediction": model_output}
        tf.saved_model.simple_save(
            sess, 'path/to/your/location/', inputs, outputs
        )

Restoring:

graph = tf.Graph()
with restored_graph.as_default():
    with tf.Session as sess:
        tf.saved_model.loader.load(
            sess,
            [tag_constants.SERVING],
        'path/to/your/location/',
        )
        batch_size_placeholder = graph.get_tensor_by_name('batch_size_placeholder:0')
        features_placeholder = graph.get_tensor_by_name('features_placeholder:0')
        labels_placeholder = graph.get_tensor_by_name('labels_placeholder:0')
        prediction = restored_graph.get_tensor_by_name('dense/BiasAdd:0')

        sess.run(prediction, feed_dict={
            batch_size_placeholder: some_value,
            features_placeholder: some_other_value,
            labels_placeholder: another_value
        })

Standalone example

Original blog post

The following code generates random data for the sake of the demonstration.

  1. We start by creating the placeholders. They will hold the data at runtime. From them, we create the Dataset and then its Iterator. We get the iterator's generated tensor, called input_tensor which will serve as input to our model.
  2. The model itself is built from input_tensor: a GRU-based bidirectional RNN followed by a dense classifier. Because why not.
  3. The loss is a softmax_cross_entropy_with_logits, optimized with Adam. After 2 epochs (of 2 batches each), we save the "trained" model with tf.saved_model.simple_save. If you run the code as is, then the model will be saved in a folder called simple/ in your current working directory.
  4. In a new graph, we then restore the saved model with tf.saved_model.loader.load. We grab the placeholders and logits with graph.get_tensor_by_name and the Iterator initializing operation with graph.get_operation_by_name.
  5. Lastly we run an inference for both batches in the dataset, and check that the saved and restored model both yield the same values. They do!

Code:

import os
import shutil
import numpy as np
import tensorflow as tf
from tensorflow.python.saved_model import tag_constants


def model(graph, input_tensor):
    """Create the model which consists of
    a bidirectional rnn (GRU(10)) followed by a dense classifier

    Args:
        graph (tf.Graph): Tensors' graph
        input_tensor (tf.Tensor): Tensor fed as input to the model

    Returns:
        tf.Tensor: the model's output layer Tensor
    """
    cell = tf.nn.rnn_cell.GRUCell(10)
    with graph.as_default():
        ((fw_outputs, bw_outputs), (fw_state, bw_state)) = tf.nn.bidirectional_dynamic_rnn(
            cell_fw=cell,
            cell_bw=cell,
            inputs=input_tensor,
            sequence_length=[10] * 32,
            dtype=tf.float32,
            swap_memory=True,
            scope=None)
        outputs = tf.concat((fw_outputs, bw_outputs), 2)
        mean = tf.reduce_mean(outputs, axis=1)
        dense = tf.layers.dense(mean, 5, activation=None)

        return dense


def get_opt_op(graph, logits, labels_tensor):
    """Create optimization operation from model's logits and labels

    Args:
        graph (tf.Graph): Tensors' graph
        logits (tf.Tensor): The model's output without activation
        labels_tensor (tf.Tensor): Target labels

    Returns:
        tf.Operation: the operation performing a stem of Adam optimizer
    """
    with graph.as_default():
        with tf.variable_scope('loss'):
            loss = tf.reduce_mean(tf.nn.softmax_cross_entropy_with_logits(
                    logits=logits, labels=labels_tensor, name='xent'),
                    name="mean-xent"
                    )
        with tf.variable_scope('optimizer'):
            opt_op = tf.train.AdamOptimizer(1e-2).minimize(loss)
        return opt_op


if __name__ == '__main__':
    # Set random seed for reproducibility
    # and create synthetic data
    np.random.seed(0)
    features = np.random.randn(64, 10, 30)
    labels = np.eye(5)[np.random.randint(0, 5, (64,))]

    graph1 = tf.Graph()
    with graph1.as_default():
        # Random seed for reproducibility
        tf.set_random_seed(0)
        # Placeholders
        batch_size_ph = tf.placeholder(tf.int64, name='batch_size_ph')
        features_data_ph = tf.placeholder(tf.float32, [None, None, 30], 'features_data_ph')
        labels_data_ph = tf.placeholder(tf.int32, [None, 5], 'labels_data_ph')
        # Dataset
        dataset = tf.data.Dataset.from_tensor_slices((features_data_ph, labels_data_ph))
        dataset = dataset.batch(batch_size_ph)
        iterator = tf.data.Iterator.from_structure(dataset.output_types, dataset.output_shapes)
        dataset_init_op = iterator.make_initializer(dataset, name='dataset_init')
        input_tensor, labels_tensor = iterator.get_next()

        # Model
        logits = model(graph1, input_tensor)
        # Optimization
        opt_op = get_opt_op(graph1, logits, labels_tensor)

        with tf.Session(graph=graph1) as sess:
            # Initialize variables
            tf.global_variables_initializer().run(session=sess)
            for epoch in range(3):
                batch = 0
                # Initialize dataset (could feed epochs in Dataset.repeat(epochs))
                sess.run(
                    dataset_init_op,
                    feed_dict={
                        features_data_ph: features,
                        labels_data_ph: labels,
                        batch_size_ph: 32
                    })
                values = []
                while True:
                    try:
                        if epoch < 2:
                            # Training
                            _, value = sess.run([opt_op, logits])
                            print('Epoch {}, batch {} | Sample value: {}'.format(epoch, batch, value[0]))
                            batch += 1
                        else:
                            # Final inference
                            values.append(sess.run(logits))
                            print('Epoch {}, batch {} | Final inference | Sample value: {}'.format(epoch, batch, values[-1][0]))
                            batch += 1
                    except tf.errors.OutOfRangeError:
                        break
            # Save model state
            print('\nSaving...')
            cwd = os.getcwd()
            path = os.path.join(cwd, 'simple')
            shutil.rmtree(path, ignore_errors=True)
            inputs_dict = {
                "batch_size_ph": batch_size_ph,
                "features_data_ph": features_data_ph,
                "labels_data_ph": labels_data_ph
            }
            outputs_dict = {
                "logits": logits
            }
            tf.saved_model.simple_save(
                sess, path, inputs_dict, outputs_dict
            )
            print('Ok')
    # Restoring
    graph2 = tf.Graph()
    with graph2.as_default():
        with tf.Session(graph=graph2) as sess:
            # Restore saved values
            print('\nRestoring...')
            tf.saved_model.loader.load(
                sess,
                [tag_constants.SERVING],
                path
            )
            print('Ok')
            # Get restored placeholders
            labels_data_ph = graph2.get_tensor_by_name('labels_data_ph:0')
            features_data_ph = graph2.get_tensor_by_name('features_data_ph:0')
            batch_size_ph = graph2.get_tensor_by_name('batch_size_ph:0')
            # Get restored model output
            restored_logits = graph2.get_tensor_by_name('dense/BiasAdd:0')
            # Get dataset initializing operation
            dataset_init_op = graph2.get_operation_by_name('dataset_init')

            # Initialize restored dataset
            sess.run(
                dataset_init_op,
                feed_dict={
                    features_data_ph: features,
                    labels_data_ph: labels,
                    batch_size_ph: 32
                }

            )
            # Compute inference for both batches in dataset
            restored_values = []
            for i in range(2):
                restored_values.append(sess.run(restored_logits))
                print('Restored values: ', restored_values[i][0])

    # Check if original inference and restored inference are equal
    valid = all((v == rv).all() for v, rv in zip(values, restored_values))
    print('\nInferences match: ', valid)

This will print:

$ python3 save_and_restore.py

Epoch 0, batch 0 | Sample value: [-0.13851789 -0.3087595   0.12804556  0.20013677 -0.08229901]
Epoch 0, batch 1 | Sample value: [-0.00555491 -0.04339041 -0.05111827 -0.2480045  -0.00107776]
Epoch 1, batch 0 | Sample value: [-0.19321944 -0.2104792  -0.00602257  0.07465433  0.11674127]
Epoch 1, batch 1 | Sample value: [-0.05275984  0.05981954 -0.15913513 -0.3244143   0.10673307]
Epoch 2, batch 0 | Final inference | Sample value: [-0.26331693 -0.13013336 -0.12553    -0.04276478  0.2933622 ]
Epoch 2, batch 1 | Final inference | Sample value: [-0.07730117  0.11119192 -0.20817074 -0.35660955  0.16990358]

Saving...
INFO:tensorflow:Assets added to graph.
INFO:tensorflow:No assets to write.
INFO:tensorflow:SavedModel written to: b'/some/path/simple/saved_model.pb'
Ok

Restoring...
INFO:tensorflow:Restoring parameters from b'/some/path/simple/variables/variables'
Ok
Restored values:  [-0.26331693 -0.13013336 -0.12553    -0.04276478  0.2933622 ]
Restored values:  [-0.07730117  0.11119192 -0.20817074 -0.35660955  0.16990358]

Inferences match:  True
  • I'm beginner and I need more explanation... : If I have a CNN model, should I store just 1. inputs_placeholder 2. labels_placeholder, and 3. output_of_cnn? Or all the intermediate tf.contrib.layers? – Noong Jun 16 at 11:43
  • The graph is entirely restored. You could check it running [n.name for n in graph2.as_graph_def().node]. As the documentation says, simple save is aimed at simplifying the interaction with tensorflow serving, this is the point of the arguments; other variables are however still restored, otherwise inference would not happen. Just grab your variables of interest as I did in the example. Check out the documentation – ted Jun 16 at 12:25
  • Update: works with 1.10 too – ted Sep 3 at 9:49
  • @ted when would I use tf.saved_model.simple_save vs tf.train.Saver()? From my intuition I would use tf.train.Saver() during training and to store different moments in time. I would use tf.saved_model.simple_save when training is done to use in production. (I asked the same also in a comment here) – loco.loop Sep 5 at 3:02
  • yes I'd say it's a good way to go – ted Sep 5 at 9:10

I am improving my answer to add more details for saving and restoring models.

In(and after) Tensorflow version 0.11:

Save the model:

import tensorflow as tf

#Prepare to feed input, i.e. feed_dict and placeholders
w1 = tf.placeholder("float", name="w1")
w2 = tf.placeholder("float", name="w2")
b1= tf.Variable(2.0,name="bias")
feed_dict ={w1:4,w2:8}

#Define a test operation that we will restore
w3 = tf.add(w1,w2)
w4 = tf.multiply(w3,b1,name="op_to_restore")
sess = tf.Session()
sess.run(tf.global_variables_initializer())

#Create a saver object which will save all the variables
saver = tf.train.Saver()

#Run the operation by feeding input
print sess.run(w4,feed_dict)
#Prints 24 which is sum of (w1+w2)*b1 

#Now, save the graph
saver.save(sess, 'my_test_model',global_step=1000)

Restore the model:

import tensorflow as tf

sess=tf.Session()    
#First let's load meta graph and restore weights
saver = tf.train.import_meta_graph('my_test_model-1000.meta')
saver.restore(sess,tf.train.latest_checkpoint('./'))


# Access saved Variables directly
print(sess.run('bias:0'))
# This will print 2, which is the value of bias that we saved


# Now, let's access and create placeholders variables and
# create feed-dict to feed new data

graph = tf.get_default_graph()
w1 = graph.get_tensor_by_name("w1:0")
w2 = graph.get_tensor_by_name("w2:0")
feed_dict ={w1:13.0,w2:17.0}

#Now, access the op that you want to run. 
op_to_restore = graph.get_tensor_by_name("op_to_restore:0")

print sess.run(op_to_restore,feed_dict)
#This will print 60 which is calculated 

This and some more advanced use-cases have been explained very well here.

A quick complete tutorial to save and restore Tensorflow models

  • 3
    +1 for this # Access saved Variables directly print(sess.run('bias:0')) # This will print 2, which is the value of bias that we saved. It helps a lot for debugging purposes to see if the model is loaded correctly. the variables can be obtained with "All_varaibles = tf.get_collection(tf.GraphKeys.GLOBAL_VARIABLES" . Also, "sess.run(tf.global_variables_initializer())" has to be before restore. – LGG May 16 '17 at 0:08
  • 1
    Are you sure we have to run global_variables_initializer again? I restored my graph with global_variable_initialization, and it gives me a different output every time on the same data. So I commented out the initialization and just restored the graph, input variable and ops, and now it works fine. – Aditya Shinde Jun 4 '17 at 20:44
  • @AdityaShinde I don't get why I always get different values every time. And I did not include the variable initialization step for restoring. I'm using my own code btw. – Chaine Jun 7 '17 at 9:35
  • @AdityaShinde: you don't need init op as values are already initialized by restore function, so removed it. However, I am not sure why you did get different output by using init op. – sankit Jun 8 '17 at 6:11
  • 4
    @sankit When you restore the tensors why do you add :0 to the names? – Sahar Rabinoviz Jul 13 '17 at 0:18

In (and after) TensorFlow version 0.11.0RC1, you can save and restore your model directly by calling tf.train.export_meta_graph and tf.train.import_meta_graph according to https://www.tensorflow.org/programmers_guide/meta_graph.

Save the model

w1 = tf.Variable(tf.truncated_normal(shape=[10]), name='w1')
w2 = tf.Variable(tf.truncated_normal(shape=[20]), name='w2')
tf.add_to_collection('vars', w1)
tf.add_to_collection('vars', w2)
saver = tf.train.Saver()
sess = tf.Session()
sess.run(tf.global_variables_initializer())
saver.save(sess, 'my-model')
# `save` method will call `export_meta_graph` implicitly.
# you will get saved graph files:my-model.meta

Restore the model

sess = tf.Session()
new_saver = tf.train.import_meta_graph('my-model.meta')
new_saver.restore(sess, tf.train.latest_checkpoint('./'))
all_vars = tf.get_collection('vars')
for v in all_vars:
    v_ = sess.run(v)
    print(v_)
  • 4
    how to load variables from the saved model? How to copy values in some other variable? – neel Dec 19 '16 at 8:58
  • 7
    I am unable to get this code working. The model does get saved but I cannot restore it. It is giving me this error. <built-in function TF_Run> returned a result with an error set – Saad Qureshi Jan 8 '17 at 9:05
  • 2
    When after restoring I access the variables like shown above, it works. But I cannot get the variables more directly using tf.get_variable_scope().reuse_variables() followed by var = tf.get_variable("varname"). This gives me the error: "ValueError: Variable varname does not exist, or was not created with tf.get_variable()." Why? Should this not be possible? – Johsm Jan 12 '17 at 14:16
  • 3
    This works well for variables only, but how can you get access to a placeholder and feed values to it after restoring the graph? – kbrose Mar 29 '17 at 16:09
  • 6
    This only shows how to restore the variables. How can you restore the entire model and test it on new data without redefining the network? – Chaine Jun 6 '17 at 19:26

For TensorFlow version < 0.11.0RC1:

The checkpoints that are saved contain values for the Variables in your model, not the model/graph itself, which means that the graph should be the same when you restore the checkpoint.

Here's an example for a linear regression where there's a training loop that saves variable checkpoints and an evaluation section that will restore variables saved in a prior run and compute predictions. Of course, you can also restore variables and continue training if you'd like.

x = tf.placeholder(tf.float32)
y = tf.placeholder(tf.float32)

w = tf.Variable(tf.zeros([1, 1], dtype=tf.float32))
b = tf.Variable(tf.ones([1, 1], dtype=tf.float32))
y_hat = tf.add(b, tf.matmul(x, w))

...more setup for optimization and what not...

saver = tf.train.Saver()  # defaults to saving all variables - in this case w and b

with tf.Session() as sess:
    sess.run(tf.initialize_all_variables())
    if FLAGS.train:
        for i in xrange(FLAGS.training_steps):
            ...training loop...
            if (i + 1) % FLAGS.checkpoint_steps == 0:
                saver.save(sess, FLAGS.checkpoint_dir + 'model.ckpt',
                           global_step=i+1)
    else:
        # Here's where you're restoring the variables w and b.
        # Note that the graph is exactly as it was when the variables were
        # saved in a prior training run.
        ckpt = tf.train.get_checkpoint_state(FLAGS.checkpoint_dir)
        if ckpt and ckpt.model_checkpoint_path:
            saver.restore(sess, ckpt.model_checkpoint_path)
        else:
            ...no checkpoint found...

        # Now you can run the model to get predictions
        batch_x = ...load some data...
        predictions = sess.run(y_hat, feed_dict={x: batch_x})

Here are the docs for Variables, which cover saving and restoring. And here are the docs for the Saver.

There are two parts to the model, the model definition, saved by Supervisor as graph.pbtxt in the model directory and the numerical values of tensors, saved into checkpoint files like model.ckpt-1003418.

The model definition can be restored using tf.import_graph_def, and the weights are restored using Saver.

However, Saver uses special collection holding list of variables that's attached to the model Graph, and this collection is not initialized using import_graph_def, so you can't use the two together at the moment (it's on our roadmap to fix). For now, you have to use approach of Ryan Sepassi -- manually construct a graph with identical node names, and use Saver to load the weights into it.

(Alternatively you could hack it by using by using import_graph_def, creating variables manually, and using tf.add_to_collection(tf.GraphKeys.VARIABLES, variable) for each variable, then using Saver)

  • In the classify_image.py example that uses inceptionv3, only the graphdef is loaded. Does it mean that now the GraphDef also contains the Variable ? – jrabary Feb 5 '16 at 20:42
  • 1
    @jrabary The model has probably been frozen. – Eric Platon Mar 21 '16 at 2:27
  • Hey, I'm new to tensorflow and am having trouble saving my model. I would really appreciate it if you could help me stackoverflow.com/questions/48083474/… – Ruchir Baronia Jan 3 at 18:58

My environment: Python 3.6, Tensorflow 1.3.0

Though there have been many solutions, most of them is based on tf.train.Saver. When we load a .ckpt saved by Saver, we have to either redefine the tensorflow network or use some weird and hard-remembered name, e.g. 'placehold_0:0','dense/Adam/Weight:0'. Here I recommend to use tf.saved_model, one simplest example given below, your can learn more from Serving a TensorFlow Model:

Save the model:

import tensorflow as tf

# define the tensorflow network and do some trains
x = tf.placeholder("float", name="x")
w = tf.Variable(2.0, name="w")
b = tf.Variable(0.0, name="bias")

h = tf.multiply(x, w)
y = tf.add(h, b, name="y")
sess = tf.Session()
sess.run(tf.global_variables_initializer())

# save the model
export_path =  './savedmodel'
builder = tf.saved_model.builder.SavedModelBuilder(export_path)

tensor_info_x = tf.saved_model.utils.build_tensor_info(x)
tensor_info_y = tf.saved_model.utils.build_tensor_info(y)

prediction_signature = (
  tf.saved_model.signature_def_utils.build_signature_def(
      inputs={'x_input': tensor_info_x},
      outputs={'y_output': tensor_info_y},
      method_name=tf.saved_model.signature_constants.PREDICT_METHOD_NAME))

builder.add_meta_graph_and_variables(
  sess, [tf.saved_model.tag_constants.SERVING],
  signature_def_map={
      tf.saved_model.signature_constants.DEFAULT_SERVING_SIGNATURE_DEF_KEY:
          prediction_signature 
  },
  )
builder.save()

Load the model:

import tensorflow as tf
sess=tf.Session() 
signature_key = tf.saved_model.signature_constants.DEFAULT_SERVING_SIGNATURE_DEF_KEY
input_key = 'x_input'
output_key = 'y_output'

export_path =  './savedmodel'
meta_graph_def = tf.saved_model.loader.load(
           sess,
          [tf.saved_model.tag_constants.SERVING],
          export_path)
signature = meta_graph_def.signature_def

x_tensor_name = signature[signature_key].inputs[input_key].name
y_tensor_name = signature[signature_key].outputs[output_key].name

x = sess.graph.get_tensor_by_name(x_tensor_name)
y = sess.graph.get_tensor_by_name(y_tensor_name)

y_out = sess.run(y, {x: 3.0})
  • 4
    +1 for a great example of the SavedModel API. However, I wish your Save the model section showed a training loop like Ryan Sepassi's answer! I realize this is an old question, but this response is one of the few (and valuable) examples of SavedModel I found on Google. – Dylan F Dec 26 '17 at 3:07
  • @Tom this is a great answer - only one aimed at the new SavedModel. Could you have a look at this SavedModel question? stackoverflow.com/questions/48540744/… – bluesummers Feb 11 at 15:10

You can also take this easier way.

Step 1: initialize all your variables

W1 = tf.Variable(tf.truncated_normal([6, 6, 1, K], stddev=0.1), name="W1")
B1 = tf.Variable(tf.constant(0.1, tf.float32, [K]), name="B1")

Similarly, W2, B2, W3, .....

Step 2: save the session inside model Saver and save it

model_saver = tf.train.Saver()

# Train the model and save it in the end
model_saver.save(session, "saved_models/CNN_New.ckpt")

Step 3: restore the model

with tf.Session(graph=graph_cnn) as session:
    model_saver.restore(session, "saved_models/CNN_New.ckpt")
    print("Model restored.") 
    print('Initialized')

Step 4: check your variable

W1 = session.run(W1)
print(W1)

While running in different python instance, use

with tf.Session() as sess:
    # Restore latest checkpoint
    saver.restore(sess, tf.train.latest_checkpoint('saved_model/.'))

    # Initalize the variables
    sess.run(tf.global_variables_initializer())

    # Get default graph (supply your custom graph if you have one)
    graph = tf.get_default_graph()

    # It will give tensor object
    W1 = graph.get_tensor_by_name('W1:0')

    # To get the value (numpy array)
    W1_value = session.run(W1)
  • Hi, How can I save the model after suppose 3000 iterations, similar to Caffe. I found out that tensorflow save only last models despite that I concatenate iteration number with model to differentiate it among all iterations. I mean model_3000.ckpt, model_6000.ckpt, --- model_100000.ckpt. Can you kindly explain why it doesn't save all rather saves only last 3 iterations. – khan Apr 4 '17 at 10:32
  • 2
    @khan see stackoverflow.com/questions/38265061/… – Himanshu Babal Apr 14 '17 at 21:28
  • 2
    Is there a method to get all the variables/operation names saved within the graph? – Moondra Oct 11 '17 at 17:36

In most cases, saving and restoring from disk using a tf.train.Saver is your best option:

... # build your model
saver = tf.train.Saver()

with tf.Session() as sess:
    ... # train the model
    saver.save(sess, "/tmp/my_great_model")

with tf.Session() as sess:
    saver.restore(sess, "/tmp/my_great_model")
    ... # use the model

You can also save/restore the graph structure itself (see the MetaGraph documentation for details). By default, the Saver saves the graph structure into a .meta file. You can call import_meta_graph() to restore it. It restores the graph structure and returns a Saver that you can use to restore the model's state:

saver = tf.train.import_meta_graph("/tmp/my_great_model.meta")

with tf.Session() as sess:
    saver.restore(sess, "/tmp/my_great_model")
    ... # use the model

However, there are cases where you need something much faster. For example, if you implement early stopping, you want to save checkpoints every time the model improves during training (as measured on the validation set), then if there is no progress for some time, you want to roll back to the best model. If you save the model to disk every time it improves, it will tremendously slow down training. The trick is to save the variable states to memory, then just restore them later:

... # build your model

# get a handle on the graph nodes we need to save/restore the model
graph = tf.get_default_graph()
gvars = graph.get_collection(tf.GraphKeys.GLOBAL_VARIABLES)
assign_ops = [graph.get_operation_by_name(v.op.name + "/Assign") for v in gvars]
init_values = [assign_op.inputs[1] for assign_op in assign_ops]

with tf.Session() as sess:
    ... # train the model

    # when needed, save the model state to memory
    gvars_state = sess.run(gvars)

    # when needed, restore the model state
    feed_dict = {init_value: val
                 for init_value, val in zip(init_values, gvars_state)}
    sess.run(assign_ops, feed_dict=feed_dict)

A quick explanation: when you create a variable X, TensorFlow automatically creates an assignment operation X/Assign to set the variable's initial value. Instead of creating placeholders and extra assignment ops (which would just make the graph messy), we just use these existing assignment ops. The first input of each assignment op is a reference to the variable it is supposed to initialize, and the second input (assign_op.inputs[1]) is the initial value. So in order to set any value we want (instead of the initial value), we need to use a feed_dict and replace the initial value. Yes, TensorFlow lets you feed a value for any op, not just for placeholders, so this works fine.

As Yaroslav said, you can hack restoring from a graph_def and checkpoint by importing the graph, manually creating variables, and then using a Saver.

I implemented this for my personal use, so I though I'd share the code here.

Link: https://gist.github.com/nikitakit/6ef3b72be67b86cb7868

(This is, of course, a hack, and there is no guarantee that models saved this way will remain readable in future versions of TensorFlow.)

If it is an internally saved model, you just specify a restorer for all variables as

restorer = tf.train.Saver(tf.all_variables())

and use it to restore variables in a current session:

restorer.restore(self._sess, model_file)

For the external model you need to specify the mapping from the its variable names to your variable names. You can view the model variable names using the command

python /path/to/tensorflow/tensorflow/python/tools/inspect_checkpoint.py --file_name=/path/to/pretrained_model/model.ckpt

The inspect_checkpoint.py script can be found in './tensorflow/python/tools' folder of the Tensorflow source.

To specify the mapping, you can use my Tensorflow-Worklab, which contains a set of classes and scripts to train and retrain different models. It includes an example of retraining ResNet models, located here

Here's my simple solution for the two basic cases differing on whether you want to load the graph from file or build it during runtime.

This answer holds for Tensorflow 0.12+ (including 1.0).

Rebuilding the graph in code

Saving

graph = ... # build the graph
saver = tf.train.Saver()  # create the saver after the graph
with ... as sess:  # your session object
    saver.save(sess, 'my-model')

Loading

graph = ... # build the graph
saver = tf.train.Saver()  # create the saver after the graph
with ... as sess:  # your session object
    saver.restore(sess, tf.train.latest_checkpoint('./'))
    # now you can use the graph, continue training or whatever

Loading also the graph from a file

When using this technique, make sure all your layers/variables have explicitly set unique names. Otherwise Tensorflow will make the names unique itself and they'll be thus different from the names stored in the file. It's not a problem in the previous technique, because the names are "mangled" the same way in both loading and saving.

Saving

graph = ... # build the graph

for op in [ ... ]:  # operators you want to use after restoring the model
    tf.add_to_collection('ops_to_restore', op)

saver = tf.train.Saver()  # create the saver after the graph
with ... as sess:  # your session object
    saver.save(sess, 'my-model')

Loading

with ... as sess:  # your session object
    saver = tf.train.import_meta_graph('my-model.meta')
    saver.restore(sess, tf.train.latest_checkpoint('./'))
    ops = tf.get_collection('ops_to_restore')  # here are your operators in the same order in which you saved them to the collection
  • -1 Starting your answer by dismissing "all other answers here" is a bit harsh. That said, I downvoted for other reasons: you should definitely save all global variables, not just the trainable variables. For example, the global_step variable and the moving averages of batch normalization are non-trainable variables, but both are definitely worth saving. Also, you should more clearly distinguish the construction of the graph from running the session, for example Saver(...).save() will create new nodes every time you run it. Probably not what you want. And there's more... :/ – MiniQuark May 31 '17 at 19:54
  • @MiniQuark ok, thanks for your feedback, I'll edit the answer according to your suggestions ;) – Martin Pecka Jun 1 '17 at 8:10

You can also check out examples in TensorFlow/skflow, which offers save and restore methods that can help you easily manage your models. It has parameters that you can also control how frequently you want to back up your model.

If you use tf.train.MonitoredTrainingSession as the default session, you don't need to add extra code to do save/restore things. Just pass a checkpoint dir name to MonitoredTrainingSession's constructor, it will use session hooks to handle these.

  • using tf.train.Supervisor will handle creating such a session for you, and provides a more complete solution. – Mark Jun 6 '17 at 20:23
  • 1
    @Mark tf.train.Supervisor is deprecated – Changming Sun Jun 8 '17 at 6:27
  • Do you have any link supporting the claim that Supervisor is deprecated? I didn't see anything that indicates this to be the case. – Mark Jun 8 '17 at 12:59
  • 2
    A minimal working example would be great! – Martin R. Jul 12 '17 at 13:11

As described in issue 6255:

use '**./**model_name.ckpt'
saver.restore(sess,'./my_model_final.ckpt')

instead of

saver.restore('my_model_final.ckpt')

All the answers here are great, but I want to add two things.

First, to elaborate on @user7505159's answer, the "./" can be important to add to the beginning of the file name that you are restoring.

For example, you can save a graph with no "./" in the file name like so:

# Some graph defined up here with specific names

saver = tf.train.Saver()
save_file = 'model.ckpt'

with tf.Session() as sess:
    sess.run(tf.global_variables_initializer())
    saver.save(sess, save_file)

But in order to restore the graph, you may need to prepend a "./" to the file_name:

# Same graph defined up here

saver = tf.train.Saver()
save_file = './' + 'model.ckpt' # String addition used for emphasis

with tf.Session() as sess:
    sess.run(tf.global_variables_initializer())
    saver.restore(sess, save_file)

You will not always need the "./", but it can cause problems depending on your environment and version of TensorFlow.

It also want to mention that the sess.run(tf.global_variables_initializer()) can be important before restoring the session.

If you are receiving an error regarding uninitialized variables when trying to restore a saved session, make sure you include sess.run(tf.global_variables_initializer()) before the saver.restore(sess, save_file) line. It can save you a headache.

protected by Community Dec 23 '17 at 15:53

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