383

How do I set a default value in Doctrine 2?

4
  • 27
    @ORM\Column(name="foo", type="decimal", precision=7, scale=2, options={"default" = 0}) works (from the non-popular answer below)
    – WayFarer
    Aug 21, 2012 at 14:01
  • 5
    @ORM\Column(name="is_activated", type="boolean",options={"default":0}) OR @ORM\Column(name="is_activated", type="boolean",options={"default"= 0}) Nov 19, 2013 at 15:10
  • 1
    Ahmed this doesn't seem to work for booleans in Symfony 2.3. However options={"default" = "0"}) does work, putting the integer in quotes.
    – Acyra
    Mar 7, 2014 at 15:23
  • 4
    If it's a boolean, why aren't you using: options={"default":false} ?
    – robocoder
    Oct 12, 2017 at 16:36

16 Answers 16

657
<?php
/**
 * @Entity
 */
class myEntity {
    /**
     * @var string
     *
     * @ORM\Column(name="myColumn", type="integer", options={"default" : 0})
     */
    private $myColumn;
    ...
}

Note that this uses SQL DEFAULT, which is not supported for some fields like BLOB and TEXT.

11
  • 5
    Good catch! It seems there are no options={"default" = 0} option in official documentation
    – WayFarer
    Aug 21, 2012 at 13:57
  • 3
    FYI, the options parameter is also useful for unsigned values. see this answer
    – yvoyer
    Jan 8, 2013 at 18:55
  • 5
    I use both this and the accepted answer to cover all bases. Also just a note that you can also do: options={"default": 0} Be careful to use " and not ', as it causes errors in my version of doctrine. Jun 17, 2014 at 7:37
  • 37
    This should be the selected answer!
    – Acelasi Eu
    Sep 23, 2014 at 20:22
  • 3
    When working with migrations, this is definitely the desired solution, as otherwise a doctrine:migrations:diff will not understand that you have set a default value, since that only scans the annotation/metadata and not the PHP defaults.
    – Oldskool
    Aug 16, 2016 at 15:43
422

Database default values are not "portably" supported. The only way to use database default values is through the columnDefinition mapping attribute where you specify the SQL snippet (DEFAULT cause inclusive) for the column the field is mapped to.

You can use:

<?php
/**
 * @Entity
 */
class myEntity {
    /**
     * @var string
     *
     * @Column(name="myColumn", type="string", length="50")
     */
    private $myColumn = 'myDefaultValue';
    ...
}

PHP-level default values are preferred as these are also properly available on newly created and persisted objects (Doctrine will not go back to the database after persisting a new object to get the default values).

10
  • 11
    but there is a problem here : What if I set a "datetime" type?
    – artragis
    Sep 11, 2012 at 9:04
  • 48
    @artragis put your instanciation in the entity constructor Sep 29, 2012 at 17:52
  • 19
    Care has to be taken with migrations using this approach as any existing rows will cause the migration to fail.
    – Tamlyn
    Oct 29, 2013 at 14:44
  • 7
    Do not use the instantiation area to set variables... Trust me, bad thing will happen. Use the constructor area instead.
    – mimoralea
    Sep 4, 2014 at 15:08
  • 4
    I reccomend to use the columnDefinition in the annotation, or somebody will use the mysql client or phpmyadmin and the values will be wrong...
    – NDM
    May 4, 2015 at 14:09
65

Set up a constructor in your entity and set the default value there.

6
59

Use:

options={"default":"foo bar"}

and not:

options={"default"="foo bar"}

For instance:

/**
* @ORM\Column(name="foo", type="smallint", options={"default":0})
*/
private $foo
2
57

Update

One more reason why read the documentation for Symfony will never go out of trend. There is a simple solution for my specific case and is to set the field type option empty_data to a default value.

Again, this solution is only for the scenario where an empty input in a form sets the DB field to null.

Background

None of the previous answers helped me with my specific scenario but I found a solution.

I had a form field that needed to behave as follow:

  1. Not required, could be left blank. (Used 'required' => false)
  2. If left blank, it should default to a given value. For better user experience, I did not set the default value on the input field but rather used the html attribute 'placeholder' since it is less obtrusive.

I then tried all the recommendations given in here. Let me list them:

  • Set a default value when for the entity property:
<?php
/**
 * @Entity
 */
class myEntity {
    /**
     * @var string
     *
     * @Column(name="myColumn", type="string", length="50")
     */
    private $myColumn = 'myDefaultValue';
    ...
}
  • Use the options annotation:
@ORM\Column(name="foo", options={"default":"foo bar"})
  • Set the default value on the constructor:
/**
 * @Entity
 */
class myEntity {
    ...
    public function __construct()
    {
        $this->myColumn = 'myDefaultValue';
    }
    ...
}
None of it worked and all because of how Symfony uses your Entity class.

IMPORTANT

Symfony form fields override default values set on the Entity class. Meaning, your schema for your DB can have a default value defined but if you leave a non-required field empty when submitting your form, the form->handleRequest() inside your form->isValid() method will override those default values on your Entity class and set them to the input field values. If the input field values are blank, then it will set the Entity property to null.

http://symfony.com/doc/current/book/forms.html#handling-form-submissions

My Workaround

Set the default value on your controller after form->handleRequest() inside your form->isValid() method:

...
if ($myEntity->getMyColumn() === null) {
    $myEntity->setMyColumn('myDefaultValue');
}
...

Not a beautiful solution but it works. I could probably make a validation group but there may be people that see this issue as a data transformation rather than data validation, I leave it to you to decide.


Override Setter (Does Not Work)

I also tried to override the Entity setter this way:

...
/**
 * Set myColumn
 *
 * @param string $myColumn
 *
 * @return myEntity
 */
public function setMyColumn($myColumn)
{
    $this->myColumn = ($myColumn === null || $myColumn === '') ? 'myDefaultValue' : $myColumn;

    return $this;
}
...

This, even though it looks cleaner, it doesn't work. The reason being that the evil form->handleRequest() method does not use the Model's setter methods to update the data (dig into form->setData() for more details).

6
  • This answer should go to the top for sure. Form component uses PropertyAccessor to get and set the values for your properties. Maybe the property accessor should use the methods when they are available?
    – Xobb
    Aug 11, 2014 at 13:36
  • 1
    boolean columns don`t support defaults from php, so only annotations
    – Crusader
    Dec 5, 2016 at 8:34
  • This is the only solution that worked when info is coming from forms. Also I disagree with above comments concerning boolean. They do not accept the default annotation.
    – BernardA
    Nov 1, 2017 at 10:00
  • Symfony form component uses model setters but only when model format data of the form differs with data returned by corresponding getter of model object instance. If you have your custom setter/getter methods - use "property_path" form option (will be handled by PropertyAccessor) or custom DataMapper (allows to manually define data transfer routine between form and model object).
    – Arkemlar
    Nov 2, 2017 at 16:36
  • 1
    This question is about doctrine, not symfony, so this answer isn't really on topic.
    – Omn
    Oct 3, 2019 at 20:34
18

The workaround I used was a LifeCycleCallback. Still waiting to see if there is any more "native" method, for instance @Column(type="string", default="hello default value").

/**
 * @Entity @Table(name="posts") @HasLifeCycleCallbacks
 */
class Post implements Node, \Zend_Acl_Resource_Interface {

...

/**
 * @PrePersist
 */
function onPrePersist() {
    // set default date
    $this->dtPosted = date('Y-m-d H:m:s');
}
3
  • 3
    For future readers, don't rely on lifecycle callbacks :) even Marco Pivetta is against them.
    – emix
    Mar 9, 2019 at 14:57
  • 1
    Warning! If the Entity has already set the dtPosted property, then your code will simply overwrite the property. Always use accessors if they exist! if (!$this->getDtPosted()) { $this->setDtPosted(new \DateTime()); } Mar 29, 2019 at 21:33
  • @emix can you explain?
    – Erdal G.
    Dec 3, 2020 at 20:29
14

You can do it using xml as well:

<field name="acmeOne" type="string" column="acmeOne" length="36">
    <options>
        <option name="comment">Your SQL field comment goes here.</option>
        <option name="default">Default Value</option>
    </options>
</field>
9

Here is how to do it in PHP 8 using attributes.

#[ORM\Column(type: 'boolean', nullable: false, options: ['default' => 0])]
#[Assert\NotNull()]
private bool $isFavorite = false;
1
  • This has to be higher..
    – Martin
    Jul 28 at 6:59
8

Here is how I solved it for myself. Below is an Entity example with default value for MySQL. However, this also requires the setup of a constructor in your entity, and for you to set the default value there.

Entity\Example:
  type: entity
  table: example
  fields:
    id:
      type: integer
      id: true
      generator:
        strategy: AUTO
    label:
      type: string
      columnDefinition: varchar(255) NOT NULL DEFAULT 'default_value' COMMENT 'This is column comment'
3
  • 1
    With this line in my config Doctrine tries to drop the default on the column everytime I run. php app/console doctrine:schema:update Jun 3, 2013 at 0:27
  • 1
    This is the worst answer here. columnDefinition goes directly agains the purpose of having an ORM, which is abstraction from the database. This solution will break portability, will keep your software dependant on your DB vendor and will also break Doctrine Migrations tools. Feb 25, 2014 at 14:30
  • @PedroCordeiro I completely agree with you. This is just a fast solution until another issue rises.
    – Putna
    Feb 27, 2014 at 15:40
8

None of this worked for me. I found some documentation on doctrine's site that says to set the value directly to set a default value.

https://www.doctrine-project.org/projects/doctrine-orm/en/2.6/reference/faq.html#how-can-i-add-default-values-to-a-column

private $default = 0;

This inserted the value I wanted.

2
7

Works for me on a mysql database also:

Entity\Entity_name:
    type: entity
    table: table_name
    fields: 
        field_name:
            type: integer
            nullable: true
            options:
                default: 1
1
  • In annotation format for whom is interested: @ORM\Column(name="Entity_name", type="integer", options={"default"="1"})
    – Hannes
    May 3, 2016 at 7:16
3

Adding to @romanb brilliant answer.

This adds a little overhead in migration, because you obviously cannot create a field with not null constraint and with no default value.

// this up() migration is autogenerated, please modify it to your needs
$this->abortIf($this->connection->getDatabasePlatform()->getName() != "postgresql");

//lets add property without not null contraint        
$this->addSql("ALTER TABLE tablename ADD property BOOLEAN");

//get the default value for property       
$object = new Object();
$defaultValue = $menuItem->getProperty() ? "true":"false";

$this->addSql("UPDATE tablename SET property = {$defaultValue}");

//not you can add constraint
$this->addSql("ALTER TABLE tablename ALTER property SET NOT NULL");

With this answer, I encourage you to think why do you need the default value in the database in the first place? And usually it is to allow creating objects with not null constraint.

0
3

If you use yaml definition for your entity, the following works for me on a postgresql database:

Entity\Entity_name:
    type: entity
    table: table_name
    fields: 
        field_name:
            type: boolean
            nullable: false
            options:
                default: false
1
  • 1
    What if you didn't use $entity->setFieldName() before flushing? Doctrine seems to define the default value at null. The only solution in yaml is to define the default value IN the entity class which seems dumb to me since it's already defined in the yaml ... -_-
    – j0k
    Mar 10, 2015 at 13:42
1

While setting the value in the constructor would work, using the Doctrine Lifecycle events might be a better solution.

By leveraging the prePersist Lifecycle Event, you could set your default value on your entity only on initial persist.

1
  • Using lifecycle events is considered a hack. Never rely on hacks.
    – emix
    Aug 18, 2016 at 16:30
0

I struggled with the same problem. I wanted to have the default value from the database into the entities (automatically). Guess what, I did it :)

<?php
/**
 * Created by JetBrains PhpStorm.
 * User: Steffen
 * Date: 27-6-13
 * Time: 15:36
 * To change this template use File | Settings | File Templates.
 */

require_once 'bootstrap.php';

$em->getConfiguration()->setMetadataDriverImpl(
    new \Doctrine\ORM\Mapping\Driver\DatabaseDriver(
        $em->getConnection()->getSchemaManager()
    )
);

$driver = new \Doctrine\ORM\Mapping\Driver\DatabaseDriver($em->getConnection()->getSchemaManager());
$driver->setNamespace('Models\\');

$em->getConfiguration()->setMetadataDriverImpl($driver);

$cmf = new \Doctrine\ORM\Tools\DisconnectedClassMetadataFactory();
$cmf->setEntityManager($em);
$metadata = $cmf->getAllMetadata();

// Little hack to have default values for your entities...
foreach ($metadata as $k => $t)
{
    foreach ($t->getFieldNames() as $fieldName)
    {
        $correctFieldName = \Doctrine\Common\Util\Inflector::tableize($fieldName);

        $columns = $tan = $em->getConnection()->getSchemaManager()->listTableColumns($t->getTableName());
        foreach ($columns as $column)
        {
            if ($column->getName() == $correctFieldName)
            {
                // We skip DateTime, because this needs to be a DateTime object.
                if ($column->getType() != 'DateTime')
                {
                    $metadata[$k]->fieldMappings[$fieldName]['default'] = $column->getDefault();
                }
                break;
            }
        }
    }
}

// GENERATE PHP ENTITIES!
$entityGenerator = new \Doctrine\ORM\Tools\EntityGenerator();
$entityGenerator->setGenerateAnnotations(true);
$entityGenerator->setGenerateStubMethods(true);
$entityGenerator->setRegenerateEntityIfExists(true);
$entityGenerator->setUpdateEntityIfExists(false);
$entityGenerator->generate($metadata, __DIR__);

echo "Entities created";
2
  • 3
    Coming back to this from over a few years I recommend you not to use this approach, it really is a hacky hack. Nov 11, 2016 at 13:56
  • 1
    Since you do not recommend your own answer, you might just as well delete it ;)
    – Dragos
    Jan 22, 2019 at 13:25
0

Be careful when setting default values on property definition! Do it in constructor instead, to keep it problem-free. If you define it on property definition, then persist the object to the database, then make a partial load, then not loaded properties will again have the default value. That is dangerous if you want to persist the object again.

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