6

I have two lists as follows.

count = (1, 0, 0, 2, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 2)
bins = [[2.0, 3.0], [3.0, 4.0], [4.0, 5.0], [5.0, 6.0], [6.0, 7.0], [7.0, 8.0], [8.0, 9.0], [9.0, 10.0], [10.0, 11.0], [11.0, 12.0], [12.0]]

I tried to create a dictionary using following;

dictionary = dict(itertools.izip(count, bins))

And it gives me {"0": [7.0, 8.0], "1": [10.0, 11.0], "2": [11.0, 12.0]}

It gives only the unique key values only but I need to get the all the pairs as below.

{"0": [3.0, 4.0],"0": [4.0, 5.0],"0": [6.0, 7.0],"0": [7.0, 8.0], "1": [2.0, 3.0],"1": [8.0, 9.0], "1": [9.0, 10.0], "1": [10.0, 11.0], "2": [6.0, 7.0] ,"2": [11.0, 12.0]}

or interchange of keys and values in the above dictionary is acceptable.(because keys should be unique) How can I do that?

  • 1
    You can't use a list as a key as they are mutable. Using a tuple would work. – Peter Wood Nov 18 '15 at 6:55
  • If an interchange is acceptable, could you tell us what you are really trying to do? This looks like XY problem. On a related note, what is wrong with just itertools.izip(count, lst)? – Mad Physicist Nov 18 '15 at 6:56
  • @MadPhysicist I need to create a Json using these two lists – Manura Omal Nov 18 '15 at 7:00
3

You can't use a list as a key to a dictionary as it is mutable.

You could convert the list to a tuple:

>>> count = (1, 0, 0, 2, 0)
>>> bins = [[2.0, 3.0], [3.0, 4.0], [4.0, 5.0], [5.0, 6.0], [6.0, 7.0], [7.0, 8.0]]

>>> {tuple(key): value for (key, value) in zip(bins, count)}
{(4.0, 5.0): 0,
 (3.0, 4.0): 0,
 (5.0, 6.0): 2,
 (2.0, 3.0): 1,
 (6.0, 7.0): 0}

If you want to serialise to json, the keys need to be strings. You could convert the bins to strings instead:

>>> {str(key): value for (key, value) in zip(bins, count)}
{'[2.0, 3.0]': 1, '[4.0, 5.0]': 0, '[6.0, 7.0]': 0, '[5.0, 6.0]': 2, '[3.0, 4.0]': 0}

>>> import json
>>> json.dumps(_)
'{"[2.0, 3.0]": 1, "[4.0, 5.0]": 0, "[6.0, 7.0]": 0, "[5.0, 6.0]": 2, "[3.0, 4.0]": 0}'

Alternatively, just serialise the pairs, and make the dictionary on the receiving end:

>>> zip(bins, count)
[([2.0, 3.0], 1), ([3.0, 4.0], 0), ([4.0, 5.0], 0), ([5.0, 6.0], 2), ([6.0, 7.0], 0)]

>>> import json
>>> json.dumps(_)
'[[[2.0, 3.0], 1], [[3.0, 4.0], 0], [[4.0, 5.0], 0], [[5.0, 6.0], 2], [[6.0, 7.0], 0]]'
  • Is there a way to convert this to Json format? – Manura Omal Nov 18 '15 at 7:15
  • @ManuraOmal That's a different question. Short answer, yes, try it. If it doesn't work, search. – Peter Wood Nov 18 '15 at 7:27
  • @ManuraOmal I've not used json from python before. I've just tried and the keys need to be strings. I'll update the answer so you have strings as keys instead of tuples – Peter Wood Nov 18 '15 at 7:32
2

{"0": [3.0, 4.0],"0": [4.0, 5.0]} is not a valid dictionary, as the keys in a dictionary have to be unique. If you really want the entries in count to be your keys, the best thing I can think of is to make a list of values for each key:

count = (1, 0, 0, 2, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 2)
bins = [[2.0, 3.0], [3.0, 4.0], [4.0, 5.0], [5.0, 6.0], [6.0, 7.0], [7.0, 8.0], [8.0, 9.0], [9.0, 10.0], [10.0, 11.0], [11.0, 12.0], [12.0]]
answer = {}
for c, b in zip(count, bins):
    if c not in answer: answer[c] = []
    answer[c].append(b)
  • Result I got was - {0: [<built-in function bin>, <built-in function bin>, <built-in function bin>, <built-in function bin>], 1: [<built-in function bin>, <built-in function bin>, <built-in function bin>, <built-in function bin>], 2: [<built-in function bin>, <built-in function bin>]} – Manura Omal Nov 18 '15 at 7:18
  • @ManuraOmal: oops! sorry about that typo. It's fixed now – inspectorG4dget Nov 18 '15 at 7:20
  • Thank you very much. It gives not the expected but I can manage with your answer – Manura Omal Nov 18 '15 at 7:26

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