22

I have a large dataset that chokes split() in R. I am able to use dplyr group_by (which is a preferred way anyway) but I am unable to persist the resulting grouped_df as a list of data frames, a format required by my consecutive processing steps (I need to coerce to SpatialDataFrames and similar).

consider a sample dataset:

df = as.data.frame(cbind(c("a","a","b","b","c"),c(1,2,3,4,5), c(2,3,4,2,2)))
listDf = split(df,df$V1)

returns

$a
   V1 V2 V3
 1  a  1  2
 2  a  2  3

$b
   V1 V2 V3
 3  b  3  4
 4  b  4  2

$c
   V1 V2 V3
 5  c  5  2

I would like to emulate this with group_by (something like group_by(df,V1)) but this returns one, grouped_df. I know that do should be able to help me, but I am unsure about usage (also see link for a discussion.)

Note that split names each list by the name of the factor that has been used to establish this group - this is a desired function (ultimately, bonus kudos for a way to extract these names from the list of dfs).

  • 6
    Why is group_by preferred over split? Because it was written by Hadley? group_by has it's place and it isn't designed to split a data set into different data frames, while split is designed to achieve exactly that. – David Arenburg Nov 18 '15 at 9:02
  • 5
    Nope, not because it was written by hadley, but because it completes - and fast. I have a dataset that is a df of 400mb, and split results in a monstrosity ( not sure why it inflates the size), and crashes R when saving. This is a training dataset, the real one is then a 8.5GB dataset (1GB as RData). Group worked, split failed. I tried bigsplit, but did not manage to get it work either. Still, back to the question - how to do this with group_by ( and dplyr)? – MartinT Nov 18 '15 at 9:34
  • 1
    Again, group_by wasn't designed to split a data set to separate data sets. do will be probably much slower than split. split is fully vectorized and compiled function and I don't see why it will slower than any other alternative. – David Arenburg Nov 18 '15 at 9:38
  • 1
    So I assume that you have some function say f() that you want to apply to each data.frame in your list of data.frames (generated by split). If that is the case, the alternative dplyr-route (without splitting) would be something like df %>% group_by(V1) %>% do(f(.)) assuming f() returns a data.frame. Otherwise you might need something like df %>% group_by(V1) %>% do(data.frame(f(.))). If you really want to create a list, stick with split, as commented by David. – docendo discimus Nov 18 '15 at 9:38
  • You are right. I need to apply a function that generates a totally different object - a SpatialDataFrame. Thus I assume that at this stage of the workflow, I have to get "out" of the dplyr workflow. Hence I want a list of dfs, that I can later iterate through and do whatever I need. I tried a simple hack %>% do(as.data.frame(.)) but that did not work (and I did not know how to make each group append to one large list(). Hints welcome. I tried something like: xx<- group_by(df,V1) %>% do(data.frame(function(x) {coordinates(x)=(~V2+V3)})) where coordinates is from library(sp) – MartinT Nov 18 '15 at 9:51
15

Comparing the base, plyr and dplyr solutions, it still seems the base one is much faster!

library(plyr)
library(dplyr)   

df <- data_frame(Group1=rep(LETTERS, each=1000),
             Group2=rep(rep(1:10, each=100),26), 
             Value=rnorm(26*1000))

microbenchmark(Base=df %>%
             split(list(.$Group2, .$Group1)),
           dplyr=df %>% 
             group_by(Group1, Group2) %>% 
             do(data = (.)) %>% 
             select(data) %>% 
             lapply(function(x) {(x)}) %>% .[[1]],
           plyr=dlply(df, c("Group1", "Group2"), as.tbl),
           times=50) 

Gives:

Unit: milliseconds
  expr      min        lq      mean    median        uq       max neval
  Base 12.82725  13.38087  16.21106  14.58810  17.14028  41.67266    50
  dplyr 25.59038 26.66425  29.40503  27.37226  28.85828  77.16062   50
  plyr 99.52911  102.76313 110.18234 106.82786 112.69298 140.97568    50
  • You used split incorrectly. split only accepts a single argument for the factoring. Instead of split(.$Group2, .$Group1) write split(list(.$Group2, .$Group1)). Incidentally, this makes the result for Base 20x slower on my machine. – hypothesis Dec 5 '18 at 23:10
  • 1
    thanks for pointing this out! I corrected it, and indeed, base becomes slower, though still faster than others. – Matifou Dec 6 '18 at 0:19
12

To 'stick' to dplyr, you can also use plyr instead of split:

library(plyr)

dlply(df, "V1", identity)
#$a
#  V1 V2 V3
#1  a  1  2
#2  a  2  3

#$b
#  V1 V2 V3
#1  b  3  4
#2  b  4  2

#$c
#  V1 V2 V3
#1  c  5  2
  • 28
    How using plyr is sticking with dplyr? – David Arenburg Nov 18 '15 at 9:34
  • 3
    Thank you very much. This results in exactly what I wanted, and completes fast. I will not mark it as the proper answer as I am still interested how the result of group_by can be exported as list of data frames, but thank you - you have solved my problem and I learnt something! Interesting thing is, that from a 380Mb dataset, the result claims to be a 340Gb list! I hope I can save it, seems weird - but it completes very fast, in about 5 mins. – MartinT Nov 18 '15 at 10:10
  • Had the same structured problem and couldn't go through with my.data %>% group_by(colA) %>% do( . , function.that.returns.list) because dplyr expects the results back in a data.frame. Using your apporach worked perfectly results <- dlply(my.data, "colA", function.that.returns.list) – davidski Mar 4 '16 at 16:37
  • please to help! – Colonel Beauvel Mar 4 '16 at 17:17
  • why there is nothing like split_by similar to gorup_by – Indranil Gayen Feb 22 at 12:35
9

You can get a list of data frames from group_by using do as long as you name the new column where the data frames will be stored and then pipe that column into lapply.

listDf = df %>% group_by(V1) %>% do(vals=data.frame(.)) %>% select(vals) %>% lapply(function(x) {(x)})
listDf[[1]]
#[[1]]
#  V1 V2 V3
#1  a  1  2
#2  a  2  3

#[[2]]
#  V1 V2 V3
#1  b  3  4
#2  b  4  2

#[[3]]
#  V1 V2 V3
#1  c  5  2
  • 2
    with recent version of tidyr (0.4.1), you could replace do(vals=data.frame(.)) by nest(). vals will be named data by default – aurelien Mar 8 '16 at 12:01
  • note that using nest() in place of do isn't strictly the same thing; the resulting tables have only columns V2 and V3; the grouping variable is lost. – cboettig Jan 2 '17 at 5:50
  • 7
    an identical but slightly shorter version would be: df %>% group_by(V1) %>% do(data = (.)) %>% select(data) %>% map(identity) – cboettig Jan 2 '17 at 5:52
  • Using dplyr 0.5.0.9000 or later, it's possible to simplify @cboettig 's solution even further: df %>% group_by(V1) %>% do(data=(.)) %>% pull(data). – Artem Sokolov Oct 24 '18 at 4:01
6

group_split in dplyr 0.8:

Version 0.8 of dplyr has implemented group_split: https://dplyr.tidyverse.org/reference/group_split.html

It splits a dataframe by a groups, returns a list of dataframes. Each of these dataframes are subsets of the original dataframes defined by categories of the splitting variable.

For example. Split the dataset iris by the variable Species, and calculate summaries of each sub-dataset:

> iris %>% 
+     group_split(Species) %>% 
+     map(summary)
[[1]]
  Sepal.Length    Sepal.Width     Petal.Length    Petal.Width          Species  
 Min.   :4.300   Min.   :2.300   Min.   :1.000   Min.   :0.100   setosa    :50  
 1st Qu.:4.800   1st Qu.:3.200   1st Qu.:1.400   1st Qu.:0.200   versicolor: 0  
 Median :5.000   Median :3.400   Median :1.500   Median :0.200   virginica : 0  
 Mean   :5.006   Mean   :3.428   Mean   :1.462   Mean   :0.246                  
 3rd Qu.:5.200   3rd Qu.:3.675   3rd Qu.:1.575   3rd Qu.:0.300                  
 Max.   :5.800   Max.   :4.400   Max.   :1.900   Max.   :0.600                  

[[2]]
  Sepal.Length    Sepal.Width     Petal.Length   Petal.Width          Species  
 Min.   :4.900   Min.   :2.000   Min.   :3.00   Min.   :1.000   setosa    : 0  
 1st Qu.:5.600   1st Qu.:2.525   1st Qu.:4.00   1st Qu.:1.200   versicolor:50  
 Median :5.900   Median :2.800   Median :4.35   Median :1.300   virginica : 0  
 Mean   :5.936   Mean   :2.770   Mean   :4.26   Mean   :1.326                  
 3rd Qu.:6.300   3rd Qu.:3.000   3rd Qu.:4.60   3rd Qu.:1.500                  
 Max.   :7.000   Max.   :3.400   Max.   :5.10   Max.   :1.800                  

[[3]]
  Sepal.Length    Sepal.Width     Petal.Length    Petal.Width          Species  
 Min.   :4.900   Min.   :2.200   Min.   :4.500   Min.   :1.400   setosa    : 0  
 1st Qu.:6.225   1st Qu.:2.800   1st Qu.:5.100   1st Qu.:1.800   versicolor: 0  
 Median :6.500   Median :3.000   Median :5.550   Median :2.000   virginica :50  
 Mean   :6.588   Mean   :2.974   Mean   :5.552   Mean   :2.026                  
 3rd Qu.:6.900   3rd Qu.:3.175   3rd Qu.:5.875   3rd Qu.:2.300                  
 Max.   :7.900   Max.   :3.800   Max.   :6.900   Max.   :2.500     

It is also very helpful for debugging a calculations on nested dataframes, because it is an quick way to "see" what is going on "inside" the calculations on nested dataframes.

4

Since dplyr 0.8 you can use group_split

library(dplyr)
df = as.data.frame(cbind(c("a","a","b","b","c"),c(1,2,3,4,5), c(2,3,4,2,2)))
df %>% group_by(V1) %>% group_split()
#> [[1]]
#> # A tibble: 2 x 3
#>   V1    V2    V3   
#>   <fct> <fct> <fct>
#> 1 a     1     2    
#> 2 a     2     3    
#> 
#> [[2]]
#> # A tibble: 2 x 3
#>   V1    V2    V3   
#>   <fct> <fct> <fct>
#> 1 b     3     4    
#> 2 b     4     2    
#> 
#> [[3]]
#> # A tibble: 1 x 3
#>   V1    V2    V3   
#>   <fct> <fct> <fct>
#> 1 c     5     2
3

Since dplyr 0.5.0.9000, the shortest solution that uses group_by() is probably to follow do with a pull:

df %>% group_by(V1) %>% do(data=(.)) %>% pull(data)

Note that, unlike split, this doesn't name the resulting list elements. If this is desired, then you would probably want something like

df %>% group_by(V1) %>% do(data = (.)) %>% with( set_names(data, V1) )

To editorialize a little, I agree with the folks saying that split() is the better option. Personally, I always found it annoying that I have to type the name of the data frame twice (e.g., split( potentiallylongname, potentiallylongname$V1 )), but the issue is easily sidestepped with the pipe:

df %>% split( .$V1 )

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