42

We are developing android app in team. To create signed release apk you should set key store path, password, key alias and key password. If I want me and any my team member could create signed apk with same signature should I commit key store file to source control?

4
  • do not forget: if you have free git account (if you use github), your repository will be visible for everybody Nov 18 '15 at 12:43
  • no, we use our private server with git
    – mao
    Nov 18 '15 at 12:46
  • 4
    This is somewhat opinion based - in my company, we have the keystore in a separate git repo which we use as a git submodule in the android projects. It's been a good solution so far.
    – 1615903
    Nov 18 '15 at 12:59
  • @mao: could you pick my answer to the correct?
    – Justin
    Dec 3 '16 at 3:41
48

You should not.

Release keystore is the most sensitive data.

In my team, there is only one people can sign the release package. (And may be one for backing up).

All sensitive info MUST be ignored and we make a reference to these info.

In my team, we config like that:

On Android Studio:

/local.properties file:

storeFile=[path/to/keystore/file]
keyAlias=[alias's key]
keyPassword=[alias's password]
storePassword=[key's password]

/app/build.gradle, config scope:

signingConfigs {
  release {
    Properties properties = new Properties()
    properties.load(project.rootProject.file('local.properties').newDataInputStream())
    storeFile file(properties.getProperty('storeFile'))
    keyAlias properties.getProperty('keyAlias')
    storePassword properties.getProperty('storePassword')
    keyPassword properties.getProperty('keyPassword')
  }
}

buildTypes {
  release {
    minifyEnabled false
    proguardFiles getDefaultProguardFile('proguard-android.txt'), 'proguard-rules.pro'
    signingConfig signingConfigs.release
  }
  .
  .
  .
}

See my complete demo config:

apply plugin: 'com.android.application'

android {
    compileSdkVersion 21
    buildToolsVersion "22.0.1"

    defaultConfig {
        multiDexEnabled = true

        applicationId "com.appconus.demoapp"
        minSdkVersion 16
        targetSdkVersion 21
        multiDexEnabled = true
        versionCode 18
        versionName "1.3"
    }

    signingConfigs {
        release {
            Properties properties = new Properties()
            properties.load(project.rootProject.file('local.properties').newDataInputStream())
            storeFile file(properties.getProperty('storeFile'))
            keyAlias properties.getProperty('keyAlias')
            storePassword properties.getProperty('storePassword')
            keyPassword properties.getProperty('keyPassword')
        }
    }

    buildTypes {
        release {
            minifyEnabled false
            proguardFiles getDefaultProguardFile('proguard-android.txt'), 'proguard-rules.pro'
            signingConfig signingConfigs.release
        }
        debug {
            minifyEnabled false
            proguardFiles getDefaultProguardFile('proguard-android.txt'), 'proguard-rules.pro'
        }
        applicationVariants.all { variant ->
            appendVersionNameVersionCode(variant, defaultConfig)
        }
    }
}
dependencies {
    compile 'com.google.android.gms:play-services:8.1.0'
}
10
  • 5
    This is also explained here: developer.android.com/studio/publish/…
    – scai
    Jun 29 '17 at 19:01
  • 13
    If the only one people lost the keystore(for example disk damage), then you must upload a new app, old user could not update their app. Our team commit the keystore in private repo, but the sign info(storepass, keyalias, keypass) is private.
    – Ninja
    Jul 21 '17 at 4:28
  • @Ninja: We always make at least two copies of the keystore file :)
    – Justin
    Jul 24 '17 at 2:41
  • 9
    I don't understand why sharing a jks file is not good practice. Whoever uses it to sign an apk, needs to have both passwords and the alias of the jks file. If you don't store those, you 're safe, right?
    – mitsest
    Aug 7 '17 at 10:20
  • 1
    Today this can be a preference, since you can use tools to encrypt/decrypt the keystore. An alternative is to push this to a S3 bucket and download the file from there when you need it (CI for example)
    – Orlando
    Aug 21 '18 at 21:27
13

Go ahead:

  • It's AES-encrypted
  • You can keep the credentials outside source control (e.g., KeePass, Beyond Trust)
  • No one can access the key without the credentials

However, there are cons: You introduce some risk of it being brute-forced when you check it in. So you should do a cost-benefit analysis and figure out whether that's worth it to you.


Another consideration is what your organization is using for config management already. If you have a system like Azure DevOps (TFS/VSTS) in place, you should try to leverage that. If you have a secret manager, you should integrate with that.

There are tradeoffs:

+---------------------------+-------------------+------+--------+--------+------------------------+
|         Approach          |      Example      | Easy | Simple | Secure | Separation of Concerns |
+---------------------------+-------------------+------+--------+--------+------------------------+
| Config management system  | Azure DevOps      |      |        | X      | X                      |
| Private repo: unencrypted | Cleartext secrets | X    | X      |        |                        |
| Private repo: encrypted   | git-secret        |      | X      | X      |                        |
| Secret manager            | Azure Key Vault   |      |        | X      | X                      |
+---------------------------+-------------------+------+--------+--------+------------------------+

Personally, if I were setting this up in a large organization, I'd shop around for a secret manager. For a personal project or small team, I'd just commit the keystore and keep the credentials elsewhere. It depends on the scope, the risks, and what infrastructure is available.

1
  • Thank you for such a thoughtful answer and for your comparison table! Oct 7 at 12:52

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