6

Addition (1): One of the replies said that it ought to work. So I added the complete exception at the end of this post

Simplified: I have a sequence of objects, each with a collection of other objects. An example of this is a blog with a collection of posts. MSDN uses this quite often as an example

MSDN Code First to a new DataBase

What I see is that if I create a blog, I can add some posts, add the blog to the database and call SaveChanges. The entity framework recognizes that the posts ought to be in a different table with a foreign key to the table of blogs.

This is exactly how one would have created the database if Entity Framework wasn't around.

Getting all Posts from a Blog and adding a Post can be done without any knowledge about the separate Post table and the foreign key to the Blog table.

However, suddenly when I try to remove a post from a blog I get errors about foreign keys.

Note: the following is not about efficiency

public class Blog
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }

    public virtual ICollection<Post> Posts { get; set; } 
}

public class Post
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Title { get; set; }
    public string Content { get; set; }

    public int BlogId { get; set; }
    public virtual Blog Blog { get; set; } 
}

public class BloggingContext : DbContext
{
    public BloggingContext(string nameOrConnectionString)
        : base(nameOrConnectionString){}

    public DbSet<Blog> Blogs { get; set; }
    public DbSet<Post> Posts { get; set; }
}

Usage would be as follows:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        const string dbName = "MyTestDb";
        Database.SetInitializer(new DropCreateDatabaseAlways <BloggingContext> ());
        using (var context = new BloggingContext(this.DbName))
        {
            // create a blog:
            var blog = new Blog()
            {
                Name = "First Blog",
                Posts = new List<Post>()
                {
                    new Post() { Title = "My 1st Post", Content = "Hello World!" },
                    new Post() { Title = "My 2nd Post", Content = "All animals are equal but pigs are more equal"},
                    new Post() { Title = "My 3rd Post", Content = "Shall I compare thee to a summer's day" },
                 },
            };
            context.Blogs.Add(blog);
            context.SaveChanges();

The nice thing is, that the client doesn't have to know how the database is actually organized. The client doesn't have to know that the Blog and Post are in different tables. For the client a blog has a collection of Posts.

Likewise, if a client asks for a blog and accesses the posts in the blog, Entity Framework knows where to get the posts. The client doesn't have to be aware that the Posts are saved in a different table with a foreign key.

blog = context.Blogs.First();
var lastPost = blog.Posts.Last();

Entity Framework is even thus smart that it doesn't select items that are not needed. If I wouldn't use a Post collection, the Posts wouldn't be retrieved from the database

Therefore I had expected that the following would work:

blog.Posts.Remove(lastPost);
context.AddOrUpdate(blog);
context.SaveChanges();

I had expected that entity framework would have known that the last post was removed, and thus would order to remove the item from the table of Posts. Yet it doesn't do this. I get an exception that "The relationship could not be changed because one or more of the foreign-key properties is non-nullable. bla bla", meaning that the Post ought to have been removed from the table of Posts.

Question: Is it correct that a client doesn't have to know the database model Entity Framework created, except when the data is to be removed?

Addition: Of course I can remove the item from the DbSet, but my question is: If Entity Framework is smart enough the I don't have to add the post to the DbSet, why should I have to remove it?

Someone asked for the exception text

System.InvalidOperationException was unhandled

  • _HResult=-2146233079
  • _message=The operation failed: The relationship could not be changed because one or more of the foreign-key properties is non-nullable. When a change is made to a relationship, the related foreign-key property is set to a null value. If the foreign-key does not support null values, a new relationship must be defined, the foreign-key property must be assigned another non-null value, or the unrelated object must be deleted.

  • HResult=-2146233079

  • IsTransient=false
  • Message=The operation failed: The relationship could not be changed because one or more of the foreign-key properties is non-nullable. When a change is made to a relationship, the related foreign-key property is set to a null value. If the foreign-key does not support null values, a new relationship must be defined, the foreign-key property must be assigned another non-null value, or the unrelated object must be deleted.
  • Source=EntityFramework

StackTrace: at System.Data.Entity.Core.Objects.ObjectContext.PrepareToSaveChanges(SaveOptions options) at System.Data.Entity.Core.Objects.ObjectContext.SaveChangesInternal(SaveOptions options, Boolean executeInExistingTransaction) at System.Data.Entity.Core.Objects.ObjectContext.SaveChanges(SaveOptions options) at System.Data.Entity.Internal.InternalContext.SaveChanges() at System.Data.Entity.Internal.LazyInternalContext.SaveChanges() at System.Data.Entity.DbContext.SaveChanges() at TryInMemoryDbSet.TestDirectDbContext.Test2() in c:\Users\Harald\Documents\Visual Studio 2013\Projects\EntityFramework\TryInMemoryDbSet\TryInMemoryDbSet\TestDirectDbContext.cs:line 75 at TryInMemoryDbSet.Program.Main(String[] args) in c:\Users\Harald\Documents\Visual Studio 2013\Projects\EntityFramework\TryInMemoryDbSet\TryInMemoryDbSet\Program.cs:line 19 InnerException:

3
  • Have you tried blog.Posts.Remove(lastPost), then calling context.SaveChanges() instead?
    – rexcfnghk
    Nov 19, 2015 at 9:42
  • oops, a typing error. I'll correct it in my question Nov 19, 2015 at 9:43
  • Can you also post the stack trace here? In my experience, it should work as expected. Also have you tried removing the AddOrUpdate() call? EF is smart enough to detect the entity as EntityState.Modified provided your entity is tracked by the DbContext
    – rexcfnghk
    Nov 19, 2015 at 9:49

2 Answers 2

3

Question: Is it correct that a client doesn't have to know the database model Entity Framework created, except when the data is to be removed?

Addition: Of course I can remove the item from the DbSet, but my question is: If Entity Framework is smart enough the I don't have to add the post to the DbSet, why should I have to remove it?

Anwser:

You should remove it from the DbSet because when you remove it from the collection, you are actually removing the "relationship" between them. However, the relationship (in your case) is mandatory, the Post's BlogId property is NOT NULL, it means that all post must belong to a blog. When you remove from the collection, EF is trying to set the FK as a null value, that's why you get the exception.

That is the generated SQL that EF executes when you remove a Post from a Blog

UPDATE [dbo].[Posts]
SET [BlogId] = NULL
WHERE ([Id] = @0)

It would work if BlogId was nullable.

3
  • I understand what you say, and I agree that that this is the solution to solve it. But what I don't understand is that if I ADD a post to an existing blog, I don't have to add it to the DbSet<Post>. It is done for me. If I remove it, I have to remember to remove it from the DbSet also Nov 19, 2015 at 14:16
  • 2
    Your second statement is not true. You don't have to remove it from the collection and DbSet, you have to remove it only from the DbSet (collection is not necessary). The only way to remove an object, is removing it from the DbSet. When you remove it from the collection, you are removing only its relationship. EF recognizes that something needs to be inserted, and does it automatically. However, it doesn't remove something automatically, maybe for security reasons.
    – Fabio Luz
    Nov 19, 2015 at 15:23
  • I have 2 questions regarding to state tracking in collection property. Suppose I used include in retrieving a particular Blog. I would expect that Blog be immediately tracked by the dbcontext. However, will it also track each Post entity that I loaded? In other words, if I change state of any of the Post, will it be persisted? Second, does it mean that if a Blog is tracked, any modification on the collection property will result in a state change of the Blog?
    – Andes Lam
    Aug 1, 2021 at 6:28
2
blog.Posts.Remove(lastPost);

Remove lastPost from the blog.Posts collection, not from the database.

As I imagine for a Post, a blog is required, the Post can't exist with a PostId valued to null.

At least 2 solutions:

  • context.Set().Remove(lastPost), or
  • use the BlogId in a composite PK for the Post. So when set to null PostId will trigger the delete in the Db.
2
  • 1
    You are right to some extent. Removing lastPost from the collection of Posts in blog doesn't mean that lastPost should not exist anymore. But I thought it to be strange that even if I didn't specify a DbSet<Post>, Entity Framework is still smart enough to create a table with Posts and foreign keys to Blogs. Yet it isn't smart enough to remove it. If I didn't add it, why would I have to remove it. I'll wait a while, maybe someone comes with a solution, if not, I'll have to use your method Nov 19, 2015 at 10:39
  • I've just stumbled upon an article which provides an alternative solution: kianryan.co.uk/2013/03/orphaned-child Solution 3 in that article helped me solving this issue a bit. It is not ideal but it works. Sad it doesn't work out of the box like NHibernate does. Aug 5, 2017 at 12:33

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.