-1
var myProp = function() {
  this.name = name;
  this.gender = gender;
  this.age = age;
}

So I have JS class with a bunch of properties. That look like that above.

$('#nav li').on('click', function() {
  var selected_li = $(this);

  function getProp() {
    myProp = function() {
      return this.name + 'John' + this.gender + 'Male' + this.age + 'Nine'; 
    }
  }
});

console.log(myProp);

onClick of my element, i'm trying to update the properties within myProp so if I do console.log() i'll get name = 'John', gender = 'male' and so on.

Is it something to do with the scope why I cannot update my properties of myProp?

Whenever I console log myProp I just get back myProp, exactly how it is without any properties being updated?

Still learning, apologies if this seems stupid. Thanks.

  • 3
    You're overwriting your constructor with another function. It also looks like you think property assignment can be achieved by concatenating strings. There is not much we can do here other than suggesting you get a better grasp on the language. – Frédéric Hamidi Nov 19 '15 at 10:57
  • you has to create getter and setter for that – Keval Bhatt Nov 19 '15 at 10:59
  • @FrédéricHamidi sorry my bad, i've misunderstood certain aspects I guess. The answers below answer my question of what I was trying to achieve just going about it the wrong way :) – TryingToLearnJS Nov 19 '15 at 11:01
  • If you want to learn the principles of object orientated javascript, I recommend this book amazon.com/Principles-Object-Oriented-JavaScript-Nicholas-Zakas/… Also I have written how JS Inheritence works, you might find it helpful: developer.s24.com/blog/… – Kim Hogeling Nov 19 '15 at 11:58
2

In your first code block, you appear to have some global JS that sets a global variable (myProp) to a function.

In your second code block, you have an event handler which defines a locally scoped function declaration called myProp.

That function masks the global one for the lifetime of the call to the event handler.

You never call the locally scoped myProp, but if you did, it would immediately overwrite itself with a different function (defined with a function expression).

At no point do you ever touch the global myProp, and you never do anything with the local one.


It looks like you just want to have a global object with some properties in it. If you wanted to change the values of those properties you would do something like this:

var myProp = {
  name: name,
  gender: gender,
  age: age,
}

$('#nav li').on('click', function() {
  myProp.name = "John";
  myProp.gender = "Male";
  myProp.age = "Nine";
});
  • Thank you! I was going about it the wrong way, I badly abstracted my code for the example. But yeah basically, I wanted a global class with properties then once an onClick event has triggered it updates the global with the properties of my click (whatever I pass through). Thanks for the help – TryingToLearnJS Nov 19 '15 at 11:06
  • This is my favourite answer. It prevents the need of a constructor, which I personally and lots of JS developers I know, dislike because of possible performance issues. Using a simple Object is perfect for this case. In addition the problem and solution are explained well – Kim Hogeling Nov 19 '15 at 11:07
1

Assuming I've understood your question correctly, you can modify the property values of an instance of myProp:

// Create an instance of myProp
var myPropInstance = new myProp('name', 'gender', 'age');

$('#nav li').on('click', function() {
  var selected_li = $(this);

  // Update the property values of an instance of myProp
  myPropInstance.name = 'new name';
});

Notice that I'm passing values into the myProp constructor... you'll probably want to update that constructor to set instance properties based on those:

var myProp = function(name, gender, age) {
  this.name = name;
  this.gender = gender;
  this.age = age;
}
0

This is your constructor. It's the blueprints for making an object.

function Person(name, gender, age) {
  this.name = name;
  this.gender = gender;
  this.age = age;
}

Creating a person

var John = new Person("John", "Male", "Nine");

Changing Johns gender:

John.gender = "Female"
0

create getter and setter like this

var myProp = function() {
  this.name = "k"
  var self = this
  this.setName =function(name){
    self.name = name
  }
  this.getName =function(){
    return self.name 
  }
}

then use new to get its method

var myObject = new myProp();
myObject.getName()
myObject.setName("new name")
myObject.getName()

  • I personally find this a bit of a detour for the problem. Using a simple object as in Quentin's answer is more appropriate in my opinion ;) Beside that, I really dislike using getters and setters in JS :D – Kim Hogeling Nov 19 '15 at 11:11

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