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I'm newer to coding, as a warning not an excuse. I currently have a quick timer class 'wrapper' I use. While most of the time I've used it, it worked as expected, I now have an issue.

The code the timer calls back does not always have a set or even accurate estimate of how long it will take to execute that chunk of code start to finish. This leaves me with abnormally long timer update intervals to account for it, or, alternatively stop the timer, and start it again each time it 'ticks' to prevent over-lap.

I've found the first method unacceptable in my case. The second one sounded perfect, but when I tried it it slowed down the code a lot and could have easily ticked much more often after I reviewed it. I'm not sure why it slows it down so much.

Should I look at another way at doing this, besides timers, like some kind of manual control over the flow of events? This is for a simple game-update loop class. Here is said class in full below.

 public class TimedUpdater<T>
    {
        #region Public Delegates/Events
        /// <summary>
        ///     An event that is raised repeatedly at the Interval[in milliseconds] for this Instance.
        /// </summary>
        public event EventHandler<T> OnUpdate;
        #endregion

        #region Fields, Private Properties
        private Timer Timer { get; }
        private TimerCallback Callback { get; }
        private T State { get; }
        #endregion

        #region Constructors, Destructors
        /// <summary>
        ///     Initializes a new instance of the <see cref="TimedUpdater{T}" /> class.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="state">The state object to use for updating data.</param>
        /// <param name="name">The unique name representing this instance.</param>
        /// <param name="updateRateMs">The rate the the <code>OnUpdate</code> event is raised in milliseconds.</param>
        public TimedUpdater(T state, string name, int updateRateMs)
        {
            Name = name;
            Interval = updateRateMs;
            State = state;
            Callback += Process;
            Timer = new Timer(Callback, State, Timeout.Infinite, Timeout.Infinite);
        }

        /// <summary>
        ///     Allows an object to try to free resources and perform other cleanup operations before it is reclaimed by garbage
        ///     collection.
        /// </summary>
        ~TimedUpdater()
        {
            Dispose();
        }
        #endregion

        #region Public Properties, Indexers
        /// <summary>
        ///     Gets or sets the interval in milliseconds.
        /// </summary>
        /// <value>The interval in milaseconds.</value>
        public int Interval { get; set; }

        /// <summary>
        ///     States if the updater is enabled.
        /// </summary>
        public bool IsEnabled { get; private set; }

        /// <summary>
        ///     Gets the unique name that represents this instance.
        /// </summary>
        /// <value>The name.</value>
        public string Name { get; }
        #endregion

        /// <summary>
        ///     Performs application-defined tasks associated with freeing, releasing, or resetting unmanaged resources.
        /// </summary>
        public void Dispose()
        {
            Disable();
            Timer.Dispose();
        }

        /// <summary>
        ///     Enables the updater.
        /// </summary>
        public void Enable()
        {
            Timer.Change(Interval, Interval);
            IsEnabled = true;
        }

        /// <summary>
        ///     Disables the updater.
        /// </summary>
        public void Disable()
        {
            Timer.Change(int.MaxValue, Interval);
            IsEnabled = false;
        }

        /// <summary>
        ///     Processes the specified object casted to the type.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="e">The e.</param>
        protected virtual void Process(object e)
        {
            OnUpdate?.Invoke(this, (T) e);
        }
    }
  • This may help: stackoverflow.com/questions/647974/… – Tim B Nov 19 '15 at 17:09
  • Thanks, that is a good start. If you did not know how to find this link before hand, you are the superior searcher :). I did try and search for related stuff prior to this post, but so far this is by far the closest discussion I've come across for what I want. – Jacob Kemple Nov 19 '15 at 17:14
  • You are not using the Change() method correctly. Specify the dueTime, not the period. So the callback is made only once, you call Change() again at the end of the callback method to ensure you get the next callback. And you perhaps want to calculate the dueTime to compensate for the amount of time the callback method took to execute. – Hans Passant Nov 19 '15 at 17:19
  • I knew that stuff but I searched to find that particular answer since I was sure it would be covered somewhere :). The keywords you need are "fixed interval" – Tim B Nov 19 '15 at 17:22
  • Thanks and noted. Is there some easier alternative, perhaps some flag I could create to alert the call back to not occur if the flag is not set to ready type of thing, instead of calculating my codes execution time or over-compensating? EDIT: Or perhaps make the call back harmless if it's not ready, or something. – Jacob Kemple Nov 19 '15 at 17:23

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