6

I have a class that contains both primitive and custom properties:

public class Version_1
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public int Age { get; set; }
    public WeirdDad Weird { get; set; }
    public MysteriousDad Mysterious { get; set; }
}

In the future i want to extend the class with a int property plus a customization of one of my custom objects, in this way:

public class Version_2 : Version_1
{
    public string IdentityCode { get; set; }
    public WeirdChild Weird { get; set; }
}

In Version_2 class the look of WeirdDad object has been replaced with its child WeirdChild so i want to substitute it. In this example, instead, i will have in the Version_2 class both WeirdDad and WeirdChild.

How would you implement this example?

  • 1
    Why don't you abstracting weird and mysterious dad properties to return the most abstract base possible with version 1? The change you are planning to make with v 2 would break client code. Child and Dad are both "Persons", thus, have it return Person, make it virtual, and then you can override your Weird getter without braking clients because weirdchild is also a person – Oguz Ozgul Nov 19 '15 at 18:01
  • 1
    What you are looking for is called "hiding", you are probably getting a compiler warning about it when you compile the above code, but you explicitly hide by declaring the property "new", ie: public new WeirdChild Weird { get; set; } However note that this can be confusing when operating with the Version_2 object declared as Version_1, like Version_1 child = new Version_2();, child.Wierd will operate on the base class, not the derived one. – Ron Beyer Nov 19 '15 at 18:02
  • I am sorry but your question is not clear. You don't want to see the property Weird from base class on the instance of Version_2 object and you want to hide it? – Siva Gopal Nov 19 '15 at 18:02
2

Think inheritance + polymorphism

Here's some code, I'll make points after ...

public abstract class WeirdPerson() {
    public virtual void DoThis() {
        // base / default implementation as desired
    }

    public virtual void DoThat() { // ditto }
    public abstract void GoWildAndCrazy;
}

public class WeirdChild : WeirdPerson {
    public override void DoThis() { // weird child behavior}
    // etc.
}

public class WeirdDad : WeirdPerson {
   // override and add methods as needed.
}

public class Version_1
{
    public string Name { get; protected set; }
    public int Age { get; protected set; }
    public WeirdPerson WeirdFamilyMember { get; protected set; }
    public MysteriousDad Mysterious { get; protected set; }

    public Version_1 (WeirdChild child, string name, int age, MysteriousDad Dad)    {

    }
}

public class Version_2 : Version_1 {
    public Version_2 (WeirdDad dad, string name, int age, MysteriousDad grandfather) : base (dad, name, age, grandfather) {}
}

  • WeirdPerson - a more general concept that defines basic stuff for all sub-types.
    • Sub-type will get "fixed" things like Name - inheritance
    • Sub-type can override default behavior (methods) - polymorphism
    • now we don't have funny looking stuff: public class WeirdDad : WeirdChild
  • Constructors
    • Version_1, Version_2 constructors force the client to provide the proper WeirdPerson sub-type.
    • Client must give us all required stuff.
    • We can validate / cross-validate incoming arguments.
  • We don't need no stinkin' interface
    • abstract class allows us to have default behavior (methods) and default state (properties)
    • public methods and properties of any class is an interface in the general sense. We do not need to have (C# keyword) interface in order to follow the principle code to interfaces not implementation
    • abstract methods force sub-class implementation. just. like. an. interface.
  • new
    • WARNING. Method hiding severs the inheritance chain at that point. If we then inherit from this class we are not inheriting the original base class' method implementation.
  • Liskov is happy.

Additional Refactoring

Make the Version heirarchy parallel the WeirdPerson heirarchy

Assuming this fits into your design. I think, a year from now you'll be glad you did.

public abstract class Version_X {
    // all the original properties here.

    // virtual and abstract methods as needed

   // LOOK! standard-issue constructor!
   protected Version_X ( WeirdPerson person, ...) { // common validation, etc. }
}

public class Version_1 : Version_X {
    public Version_1( WeirdChild child, ... ) : base ( child, ... ) {}
}

public class Version_2 : Version_X {
    public Version_2 ( WeirdDad dad, ... ) {}
}

Edit - Motivated by comment discussion with DVK

The least knowledge principle says a client should not have to know internal details to use a class. Needing to know how to compose the correct Version and Weird is a violation, one could argue.

Let's pretend that a default constructor, for Visitor let's say, is necessary elsewhere in the overall design. Allowing this means a client can control the Version/Weird composition.

Abstraction - loose coupling - is in the abstract classes. Concrete classes must necessarily be correctly composed so "strong coupling" is inherent in creating concrete objects (the explicit-type constructor parameters), but the underlying loose coupling allows for desired flexibility.

public enum WeirdFamily { Child, Dad, Mother, TheThing }

public static class AdamsFamilyFactory () {
    public static Version_X Create (WeirdFamily familyMember) {
        switch (familyMember) {
            case Dad:
                return BuildAdamsDad();
         // . . . 
        }
    }
}

public static class MunstersFactory() { // Munsters implementation }

// client code

List<Version_X> AdamsFamily = new List<Version_X>();
Version_X Pugsly = AdamsFamilyFactory.Create(WeirdFamily.Child);
AdamsFamily.Add(Pugsly);

List<Version_X> Munsters= new List<Version_X>();
Version_X Eddie= MunstersFactory.Create(WeirdFamily.Child);
Munsters.Add(Eddie);

DoTheMonsterMash(Munsters);
DoTheMonsterMash(AdamsFamily);

public void DoTheMonsterMash(List<Version_X> someWeirdFamily {
    foreach (var member in someWeirdFamily)
        member.GoWildAndCrazy();
}
3

I believe what you want to do is called method hiding. Your Version_2 class should look like this:

public class Version_2 : Version_1
{
    public string IdentityCode { get; set; }
    public new WeirdChild Weird { get; set; }
}

When you want to access the 'Weird' property from Version_1, you will have to make a call to base.Weird

Make note however that this is not recommended and is a code smell.

  • 1
    Shouldn't there be a new in there somewhere? – CompuChip Nov 19 '15 at 18:09
  • @CompuChip Oops. I've added it xD – CodingMadeEasy Nov 19 '15 at 18:11
  • 1
    Good answer. This is kind of like using an ejection seat. Yes, it is available, but should be used only if you have absolutely no other options. – DVK Nov 19 '15 at 18:16
2

IMHO, Version_2 should not inherit Version_1 as it cannot behave totally like Version_1 :

Version_2 version_2Instance = new Version_2();
version_2Instance.Weird = new WeirdDad(); 

Never forget that inheritance assumes that you are extending base class, not modifing it.

How about using template class and a base abstract class :

public abstract class VersionBase<T>
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public int Age { get; set; }
    public abstract T Weird { get; set; }
    public MysteriousDad Mysterious { get; set; }
}

Then:

public class Version_1 : VersionBase<WeirdDad>
{
    public override WeirdDad Weird { get; set; } 
}

public class Version_2 : VersionBase<WeirdChild>
{
    public string IdentityCode { get; set; }
    public override WeirdChild Weird { get; set; }
}
  • This should be good if there is only one T object (Weird). But i have several of these custom objects. – Max Bertoli Nov 20 '15 at 8:58
1

You need to rethink what you are attempting to do a little bit, because what you are proposing breaks Liskov substitution principal.

From: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liskov_substitution_principle

Substitutability is a principle in object-oriented programming. It states that, in a computer program, if S is a subtype of T, then objects of type T may be replaced with objects of type S (i.e., objects of type S may substitute objects of type T) without altering any of the desirable properties of that program (correctness, task performed, etc.).

If you only want Version_2 to contain a WeirdChild, and not any type of class implementing WeirdDad, it can be done, but you need to back up a level and start thinking in terms of generics, interfaces, and/or abstract classes.

For example:

public interface IWeirdFamilyMember
{
    // put some properties here
}

public interface IMyClass<T> where T: IWeirdFamilyMember
{
    string Name { get; set; }
    int Age { get; set; }
    T Weird { get; set; }
}

Finally, you could define your classes as such:

public class Version_1 : IMyClass<WeirdDad>
{
    string Name { get; set; }
    int Age { get; set; }
    WeirdDad Weird { get; set; }
}

public class Version_2 : IMyClass<WeirdChild>
{
    string Name { get; set; }
    int Age { get; set; }
    WeirdChild Weird { get; set; }
}

The problem with Ksv3n's example is that you are ASSUMING the developer is assigning the WeirdChild subclass of WeirdDad to the Weird property, when in reality, it could be any type of WeirdDad, or a WeirdDad itself. This is a recipe for runtime exceptions.

  • you are ASSUMING the developer is assigning the WeirdChild - we can assume this if there is a Version_2 constructor demanding the desired subclass-type. This situation is a good object lesson on encapsulation: don't let clients set properties (state, in general) directly. – radarbob Nov 19 '15 at 19:03
  • @radarbob Yes, you could define the default constructor as private, make the Weird property a readonly property, and create a constructor that takes the correct derived object type, but then you introduce other complexities and may break existing code that relies on having a parameterless constructor. Overall, you end up tightly-coupling a whole lot of code. – DVK Nov 20 '15 at 16:03
  • 1. Giving the client a default constructor means we must allow the client to set the properties - and that's the problem. 2. If lose coupling means the wrong (sub) types can be composed then of course tighter coupling is called for. 3. As is, the tighter coupling is already there - it's implied because the wrong Weird object will break the code. So forcing the client to do the right thing per the design does not make the coupling tighter it makes the code less buggy 4. and it adheres to the least knowledge principle. – radarbob Nov 20 '15 at 17:45
  • ... continue from above ... If, due to the demands of the design, a default constructor is necessary for other purposes, then create a factory class to compose correct Version / Weird pairs. Then the client will "say" WeirdVersionFactory.Create(versionEnum.Dad); – radarbob Nov 20 '15 at 17:51
0

I agree with @CodingMadeEasy, that use of new is a smelling code.

Therefore, I suggest to use Explicit Interface Implementation.

interface IVersion_1
{
    WeirdDad Weird { get; set; }
}


interface IVersion_2
{
    WeirdChild Weird { get; set; }
}

class Version_1 : IVersion_1
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public int Age { get; set; }
    public WeirdDad Weird { get; set; }
    public MysteriousDad Mysterious { get; set; }
}

class Version_2 : Version_1, IVersion_2
{
    public string IdentityCode { get; set; }
    WeirdChild IVersion_2.Weird { get; set; }
} 

So in the client, depending upon the type of interface, correct property will be called

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.