3

Having the following table, is it possible to set a particular style for tr:first-child, when :first-child of previous tr has a different class? On the example table I want round corners on rows 2 and 4, but not on row 5 (since row 4 first child has the same class that row 5 first child).

<html>
<head>
<style type="text/css">
table { width: 100%; }
.a { background-color: red; } 
table > tbody > tr:first-child > td.a:first-child {
    border-top-left-radius: 10px;
}
</style>
</head>

<body>
<table>
    <tr><td colspan=2>title</td></tr>
    <tr><td class=a>sadsf</td><td class=a>adsfs</td></tr>
    <tr><td class=b>sadsf</td><td class=b>adsfs</td></tr>
    <tr><td class=a>sadsf</td><td class=a>adsfs</td></tr>
    <tr><td class=a>sadsf</td><td class=a>adsfs</td></tr>
</table>
</body>
</html>
  • Well, surely there is no such CSS selector. What exactly is it that you're trying to achieve with this? – Roope Nov 19 '15 at 18:05
  • JavaScript to the rescue! – Mr Lister Nov 19 '15 at 18:10
  • I want to add special formatting if previous row has a different style. I realize javascript can rescue, but this is a large application, and if there is a solution with a css selector, it will be usefull to avoid change all components of the application. – fcaserio Nov 19 '15 at 18:58
  • I know of now way to do this with CSS and would turn to javascript or the server-side code. It would be easy to set with CSS if you can specify different classes for the "special" rows through one of those methods. – Joshua Morgan Nov 19 '15 at 19:07
  • it all depends on how much freedom you have with your css classes, you can accomplish this in a quasi-fashion using solely css selectors – justinw Nov 19 '15 at 19:16
6

Short answer: No

You can reference CSS Selectors here.

Long Answer:

Let's simplify your title first:

I want to style an element, but only if that elements immediate preceding neighbor’s first child does not have the same class.

This is easily accomplishable with javascript, but let’s pretend you can’t use javascript and you have a little freedom with your class declarations.


The first thing you should do is give each parent element a unique class name (I would choose the same as the children). So in this example it would be <tr class=“a”> and so forth.

Then we can style every :first-child with the effect you want (in this case, border-radius).

Later we can use css selectors to target every element, that has an adjacent sibling with the same class name (see docs) and we will revert or remove the style just placed on it.

Here's a fiddle using li elements as demo and below in the snippet you will see another example using table elements.

tr {
    color: orange; 
}
tr.a > td.a:first-child,
tr.b > td.b:first-child,
tr.c > td.c:first-child {
    color: aqua; /* style all first-children*/
}
tr.a + tr.a > td.a:first-child,
tr.b + tr.b > td.b:first-child,
tr.c + tr.c > td.c:first-child {
    color: orange; /*revert the styling on select elemets*/
}
<table>
    <tr class="a">
        <td colspan="2">class-a</td><!--should be styled-->
    </tr>
    <tr class="b">
        <td class="b">class-b</td><!--should be styled-->

        <td class="b">class-b</td>
    </tr>
    <tr class="c">
        <td class="c">class-c</td><!--should be styled-->

        <td class="c">class-c</td>
    </tr>
    <tr class="b">
        <td class="b">class-b</td><!--should be styled-->

        <td class="b">class-b</td>
    </tr>
    <tr class="b">
        <td class="b">class-b</td><!--should NOT be styled-->

        <td class="b">class-b</td>
    </tr>
    <tr class="c">
        <td class="c">class-c</td><!--should be styled-->

        <td class="c">class-c</td>
    </tr>
     <tr class="b">
        <td class="b">class-b</td><!--should be styled-->

        <td class="b">class-b</td>
    </tr>
     <tr class="c">
        <td class="c">class-c</td><!--should be styled-->

        <td class="c">class-c</td>
    </tr>
     <tr class="c">
        <td class="c">class-c</td><!--should NOT be styled-->

        <td class="c">class-c</td>
    </tr>
</table>

  • ok tks, I have tried moving the class declaration to the tr and it works as expected, but there is a lot of documents already written with the class on td. I was wondering if there was a solution without touching the current docs. – fcaserio Nov 19 '15 at 19:47
  • @fcaserio you can do it with jQuery - if you are unsure how to, a good question would be How do I add the same class to a parent element as it's child has with jQuery (or javascript) - off the top of my head, here's an example – justinw Nov 19 '15 at 21:31

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