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I want to run a Java jar file like this:

java -jar spider.jar

How to run it on the background on Windows?

Like this on Linux:

nohup java -jar spider.jar > /var/tmp/spider.log 2>&1 &
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On Windows it's not normal that a process terminates once its parent was killed (like Unix-likes do it normally). Therefore there is no direct necessity for something like nohup. If you want to avoid the console window associated with it, you can use javaw but redirection won't work, then.

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    There is a case where you need a windows equivalent of nohup: things launched with the windows "start" command are killed when you log out. – Anthony May 15 '15 at 10:37
  • @Anthony: All processes belonging to your user are killed when you log out. Note also that start is a command of cmd.exe, not of Windows. – Joey May 15 '15 at 11:59
  • @Joey but redirection won't work what do you mean by this? – Vikash Sep 25 '18 at 9:06
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    @Vikash: javaw is a GUI program, it doesn't automatically have an attached console. Hence you cannot redirect the standard streams like stdout. – Joey Sep 25 '18 at 9:07
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You could use the Windows start command:

start /min java -jar spider.jar

This command is not really the same as nohup; but it might be suitable if you're happy with the Java process running in a separate minimised window. See http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/windows/xp/all/proddocs/en-us/ntcmds.mspx

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    combining javaw with start we can get rid of minimised window too. start javaw -jar spider.jar – prembhaskal Apr 21 '15 at 10:59
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The only way to get the nohup behavior, where the process still runs after logging off (like for micro-services, analytic tools, server batch jobs etc.), is to run the .bat file with the start javaw -jar ... contents as either a service or a scheduled task.

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