5

I am wondering why the following piece of code is not working:

package main

import (
    "fmt"
)

func main() {
    for i := 0; i < 10000; i++ {
        var randomString = fmt.Sprintf("a%sa\n", "test")
    }
    fmt.Printf("Made 10000 random strings like", randomString);
}

I've stripped some unrelevant code (as this is obviously not really random).

The issue i'm having is that just under the for-loop, "randomString" is undefined.

I've tried setting it using randomString := fmt.Sprintf() and with the var you've seen above.

I'm quite sure this is a scoping issue (the randomString variable is not in the scope outside of the for-loop), but as a PHP / JS developer, i'm not used to this and would say that variable is also available after the for loop.

How can I access that variable from that point? Basically just displaying the last generated string.

7

See the relevant section from the spec: Declarations and scope:

The scope of a constant or variable identifier declared inside a function begins at the end of the ConstSpec or VarSpec (ShortVarDecl for short variable declarations) and ends at the end of the innermost containing block.

Define it in the scope in which you want to access it: before the for (in the scope of the main() function).

Also note that fmt.Sprintf() requires an additional parameter besides the ones to be printed: a format string. Either provide a format string (e.g. include a %s verb for the randomString parameter) or alternatively you may use fmt.Sprintln().

func main() {
    var randomString string
    for i := 0; i < 10000; i++ {
        randomString = fmt.Sprintf("a%sa\n", "test")
    }
    fmt.Println("Made 10000 random strings like", randomString)
}

Output:

Made 10000 random strings like atesta

Try it on the Go Playground.

  • Ah! That was so obvious I didn't see it. Great, thank you :) – Rob Nov 20 '15 at 9:41
  • And indeed, i forgot the %s in the formatted string. But Println works well for this too. – Rob Nov 20 '15 at 9:43
2

This is scoping issue, in Go the scope of randomString is the loop body, in JS it would be the whole function. Scoping rules differ in the different languages.

Check the Go spec:

https://golang.org/ref/spec#Declarations_and_scope

  • Thanks, but I've checked that page before asking the question - it didn't clear things out for me. I knew I had scoping issues so thats why I asked. – Rob Nov 20 '15 at 9:42
  • @RobQuist The relevant part for this case would be "The scope of a constant or variable identifier declared inside a function begins at the end of the ConstSpec or VarSpec (ShortVarDecl for short variable declarations) and ends at the end of the innermost containing block." – chill Nov 20 '15 at 10:01
  • Exactly :) Thanks for the effort though! – Rob Nov 20 '15 at 12:06

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