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is there a builtin function of Python that does on python.array what argsort() does on a numpy.array?

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4 Answers 4

108

There is no built-in function, but it's easy to assemble one out of the terrific tools Python makes available:

def argsort(seq):
    # http://stackoverflow.com/questions/3071415/efficient-method-to-calculate-the-rank-vector-of-a-list-in-python
    return sorted(range(len(seq)), key=seq.__getitem__)

x = [5,2,1,10]

print(argsort(x))
# [2, 1, 0, 3]

It works on Python array.arrays the same way:

import array
x = array.array('d', [5, 2, 1, 10])
print(argsort(x))
# [2, 1, 0, 3]
5
  • 2
    Instead of using the (theoretically private) getitem, you can also use operator.itemgetter / operator.attrgetter docs.python.org/library/operator.html
    – Ender
    Aug 1, 2010 at 17:58
  • If operator.itemgetter could be used as a drop-in replacement for __getitem__, I think I'd agreed with you Ender, but as far as I can see, operator.itemgetter would also require wrapping it in a lambda expression. I'd rather avoid the extra lambda if I could.
    – unutbu
    Aug 1, 2010 at 19:57
  • 1
    @Ender: itemgetter is no use here: x.__getitem__(i) returns x[i], whereas itemgetter(x)(i) will return i[x]. Apr 24, 2012 at 13:03
  • 3
    In my opinion, key=lambda i: seq[i] might be easier to understand. May 14, 2022 at 4:29
  • agreed with comment above (key=lambda i: seq[i]) might be easier to read- but still great!
    – neonwatty
    Feb 12, 2023 at 17:03
86

I timed the suggestions above and here are my results.

import timeit
import random
import numpy as np

def f(seq):
    # http://stackoverflow.com/questions/3382352/equivalent-of-numpy-argsort-in-basic-python/3383106#3383106
    #non-lambda version by Tony Veijalainen
    return [i for (v, i) in sorted((v, i) for (i, v) in enumerate(seq))]

def g(seq):
    # http://stackoverflow.com/questions/3382352/equivalent-of-numpy-argsort-in-basic-python/3383106#3383106
    #lambda version by Tony Veijalainen
    return [x for x,y in sorted(enumerate(seq), key = lambda x: x[1])]


def h(seq):
    #http://stackoverflow.com/questions/3382352/equivalent-of-numpy-argsort-in-basic-python/3382369#3382369
    #by unutbu
    return sorted(range(len(seq)), key=seq.__getitem__)


seq = list(range(10000))
random.shuffle(seq)

n_trials = 100
for cmd in [
        'f(seq)', 'g(seq)', 'h(seq)', 'np.argsort(seq)',
        'np.argsort(seq).tolist()'
        ]:
    t = timeit.Timer(cmd, globals={**globals(), **locals()})
    print('time for {:d}x {:}: {:.6f}'.format(n_trials, cmd, t.timeit(n_trials)))

output

time for 100x f(seq): 0.323915
time for 100x g(seq): 0.235183
time for 100x h(seq): 0.132787
time for 100x np.argsort(seq): 0.091086
time for 100x np.argsort(seq).tolist(): 0.104226

A problem size dependent analysis is given here.

3
  • 4
    Interesting - probably the average is more important than the 'best' of 3(?)
    – JPH
    Feb 26, 2013 at 11:02
  • 2
    The average is affected by outliers. You do not want the results be polluted by other programs running or hardware cache misses happenstances. Aug 3, 2017 at 20:47
  • 7
    For future readers, %timeit is reporting the best average from 3 averages of 100 loops each. Jun 15, 2018 at 0:31
8

My alternative with enumerate:

def argsort(seq):
    return [x for x,y in sorted(enumerate(seq), key = lambda x: x[1])]

seq=[5,2,1,10]
print(argsort(seq))
# Output:
# [2, 1, 0, 3]

Better though to use answer from https://stackoverflow.com/users/9990/marcelo-cantos answer to thread python sort without lambda expressions

[i for (v, i) in sorted((v, i) for (i, v) in enumerate(seq))]
4

Found this question, but needed argsort for a list of objects based on an object property.

Extending unutbu's answer, this would be:

sorted(range(len(seq)), key = lambda x: seq[x].sort_property)

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