27

I'm trying to create a grid using a matplotlib function like imshow.
From this array:

[[ 1  8 13 29 17 26 10  4],
[16 25 31  5 21 30 19 15]]

I would like to plot the value as a color AND the text value itself (1,2, ...) on the same grid. This is what I have for the moment (I can only plot the color associated to each value):

from matplotlib import pyplot
import numpy as np

grid = np.array([[1,8,13,29,17,26,10,4],[16,25,31,5,21,30,19,15]])
print 'Here is the array'
print grid

fig1, (ax1, ax2)= pyplot.subplots(2, sharex = True, sharey = False)
ax1.imshow(grid, interpolation ='none', aspect = 'auto')
ax2.imshow(grid, interpolation ='bicubic', aspect = 'auto')
pyplot.show()   
13

If for any reason you have to use a different extent from the one that is provided naturally by imshow the following method (even if more contrived) does the job:

enter image description here

size = 4
data = np.arange(size * size).reshape((size, size))

# Limits for the extent
x_start = 3.0
x_end = 9.0
y_start = 6.0
y_end = 12.0

extent = [x_start, x_end, y_start, y_end]

# The normal figure
fig = plt.figure(figsize=(16, 12))
ax = fig.add_subplot(111)
im = ax.imshow(data, extent=extent, origin='lower', interpolation='None', cmap='viridis')

# Add the text
jump_x = (x_end - x_start) / (2.0 * size)
jump_y = (y_end - y_start) / (2.0 * size)
x_positions = np.linspace(start=x_start, stop=x_end, num=size, endpoint=False)
y_positions = np.linspace(start=y_start, stop=y_end, num=size, endpoint=False)

for y_index, y in enumerate(y_positions):
    for x_index, x in enumerate(x_positions):
        label = data[y_index, x_index]
        text_x = x + jump_x
        text_y = y + jump_y
        ax.text(text_x, text_y, label, color='black', ha='center', va='center')

fig.colorbar(im)
plt.show()

If you want to put other type of data and not necessarily the values that you used for the image you can modify the script above in the following way (added values after data):

enter image description here

size = 4
data = np.arange(size * size).reshape((size, size))
values = np.random.rand(size, size)

# Limits for the extent
x_start = 3.0
x_end = 9.0
y_start = 6.0
y_end = 12.0

extent = [x_start, x_end, y_start, y_end]

# The normal figure
fig = plt.figure(figsize=(16, 12))
ax = fig.add_subplot(111)
im = ax.imshow(data, extent=extent, origin='lower', interpolation='None', cmap='viridis')

# Add the text
jump_x = (x_end - x_start) / (2.0 * size)
jump_y = (y_end - y_start) / (2.0 * size)
x_positions = np.linspace(start=x_start, stop=x_end, num=size, endpoint=False)
y_positions = np.linspace(start=y_start, stop=y_end, num=size, endpoint=False)

for y_index, y in enumerate(y_positions):
    for x_index, x in enumerate(x_positions):
        label = values[y_index, x_index]
        text_x = x + jump_x
        text_y = y + jump_y
        ax.text(text_x, text_y, label, color='black', ha='center', va='center')

fig.colorbar(im)
plt.show()
36

You want to loop over the values in grid, and use ax.text to add the label to the plot.

Fortunately, for 2D arrays, numpy has ndenumerate, which makes this quite simple:

for (j,i),label in np.ndenumerate(grid):
    ax1.text(i,j,label,ha='center',va='center')
    ax2.text(i,j,label,ha='center',va='center')

enter image description here

5
  • tom; out of curiosity: is such a loop using ndenumerate faster than a manual loop? – Bart Nov 20 '15 at 14:34
  • 1
    no, I don't think so (although it might depend on the size of grid). I just like the simplicity of the code, compared to for j in range(grid.shape[0]): for i in range(grid.shape[1]): ax.text(i,j,grid[j,i]) – tmdavison Nov 20 '15 at 14:38
  • Can I do this with a blue text? – Daniel Möller Aug 21 '17 at 19:38
  • 1
    @Daniel, did you try color='b' in the ax.text lines? – tmdavison Aug 21 '17 at 21:16
  • Yes, it works :) -- Thank you -- Got it with color='blue' – Daniel Möller Aug 22 '17 at 12:30

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