8

I am trying to write a library that checks for a callback function and then calls it when it is ready. The idea being that you can include the JS asynchronously and then when it's loaded it will check for the callback and execute it.

I'm using typescript. The following JS works but wont compile in TS

if(typeof myFramework.ready === 'function') {
    myFramework.ready();
}

Then the developer using the library could do the following:

var myFramework = myFramework || {}; // As the framework wont exists
myFramework.ready = function(){//Execute developer's code};

However, using TypeScript I'm getting a type error: Property 'ready' does not exist on type 'typeof myFramework' - which is not a surprise. It does compile if I do the following:

interface Window {
    ready(): void;
}

if(typeof window.ready === 'function') {
    window.ready();
}

But that would mean adding more crud to the window object. And I imagine calling a global ready() method could well be a point of failure!

How would you go about achieving this?


Thanks to @james-crosswell - as I have classes in separate files the file that had the Ajax handling bit in looked something like:

module MyFramework {
    export interface IMyFramework {
        ready? : () => any;
    }

    export class HasLoaded implements IMyFramework {
        doReady = (framework: IMyFramework) => {
            if(typeof framework.ready === 'function') {
                framework.ready();
            }
        }
    }

    var newHost: HasLoaded = new HasLoaded();
    newHost.doReady(MyFramework);
}

I may be rethinking the logic that got me here but that's a separate issue!

1
  • 3
    2019: The Elvis (?.) Optional Chaining Operator is supported in TypeScript 3.7. myFramework?.ready?.()
    – damphat
    Commented Dec 6, 2020 at 1:25

4 Answers 4

11
myFramework.ready?.();

I think is the most compact and resembles C# syntax. It uses the optional chaining operator (?.)

================

Some comments on the other answers:

Why not this?

if (!!myFramework.ready) {
    myFramework.ready();
}

(the classic double exclamation mark construct -- the first exclamation mark transforms 'undefined' into true, the second one turns it back to false (hence converting 'undefined' to a valid false boolean)

Please note : ESLint doesn't like this construct:

myFramework.ready && myFramework.ready();

It says : "Expected an assignment or function call and instead saw an expression"

3

Since you're not certain a function instance will be provided plus once it is transpiled to JavaScript you definitely cannot be certain, you can check the type before invocation:

if (typeof method === 'function') {
    method();
}

Or you can use optional chaining, though this doesn't ensure a function reference was provided prior to invocation:

method?.();

Another non-TypeScript approach that also doesn't ensure a function reference was provided prior to invocation:

method && method();
1
  • Please note that I was very happy with method && method(); but then ESLint doesn't like it :-( "Expected an assignment or function call and instead saw an expression" Commented Oct 28, 2022 at 7:35
0

You can certainly declare/export interfaces in modules in Typescript... but they're not going to be any use to users of your framework unless those users are also using Typescript (and have the tsd for your framework).

With that caveat then, the following variant on the answer from @gilamran above worked on the Typescript Playground:

module MyModule {
    export interface IMyFramework {
        ready? : () => any;
    }

    class MyFramework implements IMyFramework {
    }

    class YourFramework implements IMyFramework {
        ready = () => {
            alert("You're ready");
        }
    }

    export class Host {
        doReady = (framework: IMyFramework) => {
            if(typeof framework.ready !== 'undefined') {
                framework.ready();
            }           
        }
    }

    var host: Host = new Host();
    host.doReady(new MyFramework());
    host.doReady(new YourFramework());

}
1
  • Thanks - I'll give this a go!
    – Ed Evans
    Commented Nov 21, 2015 at 17:41
0

Why not defining a function on your framework that a user will call on load? something like init(callback_to_developer_code);

But if you insist on doing it your way, you just have to define an optional property on your framework class interface like this:

interface IMyFramework {
  ready? : Function;
}

class MyFramework implements IMyFramework {
}

var myFramework : MyFramework;

if(typeof myFramework.ready !== 'undefined') {
    myFramework.ready();
}
2
  • Thanks for this. I've been using modules to define myFramework to date (this is mostly a learning exercise to get my head around TS) - and I don't believe I can add an interface to a module? The code above also generated the same error I was getting (Property 'ready' does not exist on type 'MyFramework). I don't believe the first suggestion would work when async loading myFramework.js as init() may not exist
    – Ed Evans
    Commented Nov 21, 2015 at 0:49
  • I would help a lot if you could attach more code, and explain your goal in more details.
    – gilamran
    Commented Nov 21, 2015 at 10:44

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