Suppose for example we're talking about elements of type Int (but the question still applies to any type)

I have some functionality which needs to loop over a sequence of Ints. But I don't care if behind the scenes this sequence is implemented as an Array, or a Set or any other exotic kind of structure, the only requirement is that we can loop over them.

Swift standard library defines the protocol SequenceType as "A type that can be iterated with a for...in loop". So my instinct is to define a protocol like this:

protocol HasSequenceOfInts {
    var seq : SequenceType<Int> { get }
}

But this doesn't work. SequenceType is not a generic type which can be specialized, it's a protocol. Any particular SequenceType does have a specific type of element, but it's only available as an associated type: SequenceType.Generator.Element

So the question is:

How can we define a protocol which requires a specific type of sequence?

Here's some other things I've tried and why they aren't right:

Fail 1

protocol HasSequenceOfInts {
    var seq : SequenceType { get }
}

Protocol 'SequenceType' can only be used as a generic constraint because it has Self or associated type requirements

Fail 2

protocol HasSequenceOfInts {
    var seq : AnySequence<Int> { get }
}
class ArrayOfInts : HasSequenceOfInts {
    var seq : [Int] = [0,1,2]
}

I thought this one would work, but when I tried a concrete implementation using an Array we get

Type 'ArrayOfInts' does not conform to protocol 'HasSequenceOfInts'

This is because Array is not AnySequence (to my surprise... my expectation was that AnySequence would match any sequence of Ints)

Fail 3

protocol HasSequenceOfInts {
    typealias S : SequenceType
    var seq : S { get }
}

Compiles, but there's no obligation that the elements of the sequence seq have type Int

Fail 4

protocol HasSequenceOfInts {
    var seq : SequenceType where S.Generator.Element == Int
}

Can't use a where clause there

So now I'm totally out of ideas. I can easily just make my protocol require an Array of Int, but then I'm restricting the implementation for no good reason, and that feels very un-swift.

Update Success

See answer from @rob-napier which explains things very well. My Fail 2 was pretty close. Using AnySequence can work, but in your conforming class you need to make sure you convert from whatever kind of sequence you're using to AnySequence. For example:

protocol HasSequenceOfInts {
    var seq : AnySequence<Int> { get }
}
class ArrayOfInts : HasSequenceOfInts {
    var _seq : [Int] = [0,1,2]
    var seq : AnySequence<Int> {
        get {
            return AnySequence(self._seq)
        }
    }
}
  • " ... my instinct is to define a protocol like ...". my instinct dictates me to define my own object ( or protocol) as conforming to SequenceType – user3441734 Nov 21 '15 at 12:58
  • @user3441734 - I'm not sure how you're suggestion helps. Can you give an example? – Daniel Howard Nov 21 '15 at 13:32
up vote 8 down vote accepted

There are two sides to this problem:

  • Accepting an arbitrary sequence of ints

  • Returning or storing an arbitrary sequence of ints

In the first case, the answer is to use generics. For example:

func iterateOverInts<SeqInt: SequenceType where SeqInt.Generator.Element == Int>(xs: SeqInt) {
    for x in xs {
        print(x)
    }
}

In the second case, you need a type-eraser. A type-eraser is a wrapper that hides the actual type of some underlying implementation and presents only the interface. Swift has several of them in stdlib, mostly prefixed with the word Any. In this case you want AnySequence.

func doubles(xs: [Int]) -> AnySequence<Int> {
    return AnySequence( xs.lazy.map { $0 * 2 } )
}

For more on AnySequence and type-erasers in general, see A Little Respect for AnySequence.

If you need it in protocol form (usually you don't; you just need to use a generic as in iterateOverInts), the type eraser is also the tool there:

protocol HasSequenceOfInts {
    var seq : AnySequence<Int> { get }
}

But seq must return AnySequence<Int>. It can't return [Int].

There is one more layer deeper you can take this, but sometimes it creates more trouble than it solves. You could define:

protocol HasSequenceOfInts {
    typealias SeqInt : IntegerType
    var seq: SeqInt { get }
}

But now HasSequenceOfInts has a typealias with all the limitations that implies. SeqInt could be any kind of IntegerType (not just Int), so looks just like a constrained SequenceType, and will generally need its own type eraser. So occasionally this technique is useful, but in your specific case it just gets you basically back where you started. You can't constrain SeqInt to Int here. It has to be to a protocol (of course you could invent a protocol and make Int the only conforming type, but that doesn't change much).

BTW, regarding type-erasers, as you can probably see they're very mechanical. They're just a box that forwards to something else. That suggests that in the future the compiler will be able to auto-generate these type-erasers for us. The compiler has fixed other boxing problems for us over time. For instance, you used to have to create a Box class to hold enums that had generic associated values. Now that's done semi-automatically with indirect. We could imagine a similar mechanism being added to automatically create AnySequence when it's required by the compiler. So I don't think this is a deep "Swift's design doesn't allow it." I think it's just "the Swift compiler doesn't handle it yet."

  • 1
    Thanks Rob, very helpful. Part 1 of the solution is, as you say, requiring AnySequence<Int> in the protocol. I expected a conforming class could store its Ints in an Array<Int> and it would just work, but as you say, the protocol requires AnySequence<Int>, not [Int]. I expected (wrongly) that Swift would automatically cast one to the other. However It's trivial to overcome with a getter function. class Foo : HasSequenceOfInts { var _seq:[Int] var seq: AnySequence<Int> { get {return AnySequence(self._seq)} } } – Daniel Howard Nov 21 '15 at 16:29
  • Agreed; if this fits your needs I think it's a perfectly fine design. – Rob Napier Nov 21 '15 at 16:48
  • 1
    Also @rob-napier - Excellent article you linked to! (robnapier.net/erasure) - gets right to the heart of this (general kind of) problem and makes it crystal clear. I hope you're right that the compiler will one day take care of this for us. – Daniel Howard Nov 21 '15 at 16:50
  • @RobNapier you can use your 'storage' as generic, to hold Array<Int> or Set<Int> .... etc. but here is still some limitation how to use it. please, see my updated answer below – user3441734 Nov 21 '15 at 17:25

(Tested and working in Swift 4, which introduces the associatedtype constraints needed for this)

Declare your original protocol that things will conform to:

protocol HasSequenceOfInts {

    associatedType IntSequence : Sequence where IntSequence.Element == Int

    var seq : IntSequence { get }
}

Now, you can just write

class ArrayOfInts : HasSequenceOfInts {
    var seq : [Int] = [0,1,2]
}

like you always wanted.

However, if you try to make an array of type [HasSequenceOfInts], or assign it to a variable (or basically do anything with it), you'll get an error that says

Protocol 'HasSequenceOfInts' can only be used as a generic constraint because it has Self or associated type requirements

Now comes the fun part.

We will create another protocol HasSequenceOfInts_ (feel free to choose a more descriptive name) which will not have associated type requirements, and will automatically be conformed to by HasSequenceOfInts:

protocol HasSequenceOfInts: HasSequenceOfInts_ {

    associatedType IntSequence : Sequence where IntSequence.Element == Int

    var seq : IntSequence { get }
}

protocol HasSequenceOfInts_ {

    var seq : AnySequence<Int> { get }
}

extension HasSequenceOfInts_ where Self : HasSequenceOfInts {

    var seq_ : AnySequence<Int> {
        return AnySequence(seq)
    }
}

Note that you never need to need to explicitly conform to HasSequenceOfInts_ , because HasSequenceOfInts already conforms to it, and you get a full implementation for free from the extension.

Now, if you need to make an array or assign an instance of something conforming to this protocol to a variable, use HasSequenceOfInts_ as the type instead of HasSequenceOfInts, and access the seq_ property (note: since function overloading is allowed, if you made a function seq() instead of an instance variable, you could give it the same name and it would work):

let a: HasSequenceOfInts_ = ArrayOfInts()
a.seq_

This needs a bit more setup than the accepted answer, but means you don't have to remember to wrap your return value in AnySequence(...) in every type where you implement the protocol.

I believe you need to drop the requirement for it to only be Int's and work around it with generics:

protocol HasSequence {
    typealias S : SequenceType
    var seq : S { get }
}

struct A : HasSequence {
    var seq = [1, 2, 3]
}

struct B : HasSequence {
    var seq : Set<String> = ["a", "b", "c"]
}

func printSum<T : HasSequence where T.S.Generator.Element == Int>(t : T) {
    print(t.seq.reduce(0, combine: +))
}

printSum(A())
printSum(B())    // Error: B.S.Generator.Element != Int

In Swift's current state, you can't do exactly what you want, maybe in the future though.

  • 1
    That is helpful Kametrixom - Although in your example, HasSequence is pretty useless. If we have to drop the requirement that the sequence has a particular type, then we might as well use SequenceType directly: func printSum<S : SequenceType where S.Generator.Element == Int>(s : S) { print(s.reduce(0, combine: +)) } } – Daniel Howard Nov 21 '15 at 15:14
  • @DanielHoward Yeah I thought so too, but I figured you may also want some other requirements in your protocol – Kametrixom Nov 21 '15 at 15:15
  • It's all quite frustrating. I'm trying to stick to the principle of 'code to an interface, not an implementation'. So I'm looking to use protocols when possible instead of defining rigid, concrete classes, and every time I find that protocols fall short. This seemed like a perfect example of where a protocol should be used: I need a sequence of Ints, but it doesn't matter how the sequence is implemented - so just use a protocol which requires adopting classes to provide a sequence of Ints, any way they want... But... It's impossible. I have to force an Array, or a Set etc. – Daniel Howard Nov 21 '15 at 15:19
  • @DanielHoward What's your usecase? Why does it have to be a sequence of Ints? – Kametrixom Nov 21 '15 at 15:21
  • In my use case I don't need a sequence of Ints. I just used Ints as a simple example of what I expected to be a simple general problem. My use case is that I'm implementing an observer pattern. I have a Subject protocol and an Observer protocol. The Subject should provide a sequence of its Observers to loop through, but any sequence type will work. Doesn't matter if its an Array, or Set or whatever. Sample code here to explain more fully: hastebin.com/obotojuliw.swift – Daniel Howard Nov 21 '15 at 15:51

it is very specific example on request of Daniel Howard

1) type conforming to SequenceType protocol could be almost any sequence, even though Array or Set are both conforming to SequenceType protocol, most of their functionality comes from inheritance on CollectionType (which conforms to SequenceType)

Daniel, try this simple example in your Playground

import Foundation

public struct RandomIntGenerator: GeneratorType, SequenceType {

    public func next() -> Int? {
        return random()
    }

    public func nextValue() -> Int {
        return next()!
    }
    public func generate() -> RandomIntGenerator {
        return self
    }
}

let rs = RandomIntGenerator()

for r in rs {
    print(r)
}

As you can see, it conforms to SequenceType protocol and produce infinite stream of Int numbers. Before you will try to implement something, you have to answer yourself few questions

  1. can i reuse some functionality, which is available 'for free' in standard Swift library?
  2. am i trying to mimic some functionality which is not supported by Swift? Swift is not C++, Swift is not ObjectiveC ... and lot of constructions we used to use before Swift has no equivalent in Swift.
  3. Define your question in such way that we can understand you requirements

are you looking for something like this?

protocol P {
    typealias Type: SequenceType
    var value: Type { get set }
}
extension P {
    func foo() {
        for v in value {
            dump(v)
        }
    }
}

struct S<T: CollectionType>: P {
    typealias Type = T
    var value: Type
}

var s = S(value: [Int]())
s.value.append(1)
s.value.append(2)

s.foo()
/*
- 1
- 2
*/

let set: Set<String> = ["alfa", "beta", "gama"]
let s2 = S(value: set)
s2.foo()
/*
- beta
- alfa
- gama
*/

// !!!! WARNING !!!
// this is NOT possible
s = s2
// error: cannot assign value of type 'S<Set<String>>' to type 'S<[Int]>' (aka 'S<Array<Int>>')
  • You have missed the point completely here. I'm not trying to define yet another data structure which provides a sequence of Ints. I'm trying to define a protocol which can accept ANY sequence of ints, so that the implementer is free to use an Array if that is best, or a Set if that is best, or their own custom sequence if that is best, and it will still conform to the protocol, because the protocol only requires that it's a sequence of Int. – Daniel Howard Nov 21 '15 at 16:00
  • ...define a protocol which can accept ANY sequence of ints... ??? protocol in Swift can be generic via abstract type members rather than parameterization. consequently, the protocol itself can no longer be used as a type but only as a generic constraint. – user3441734 Nov 21 '15 at 16:46
  • @DanielHoward please check my updated answer, i hope i understand you – user3441734 Nov 21 '15 at 17:06

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