265

I pass 2 values to a child component:

  1. List of objects to display
  2. delete function.

I use a .map() function to display my list of objects(like in the example given in react tutorial page), but the button in that component fires the onClick function, on render(it should not fire on render time). My code looks like this:

module.exports = React.createClass({
    render: function(){
        var taskNodes = this.props.todoTasks.map(function(todo){
            return (
                <div>
                    {todo.task}
                    <button type="submit" onClick={this.props.removeTaskFunction(todo)}>Submit</button>
                </div>
            );
        }, this);
        return (
            <div className="todo-task-list">
                {taskNodes}
            </div>
        );
    }
});

My question is: why does onClick function fire on render and how to make it not to?

637

Because you are calling that function instead of passing the function to onClick, change that line to this:

<button type="submit" onClick={() => { this.props.removeTaskFunction(todo) }}>Submit</button>

=> called Arrow Function, which was introduced in ES6, and will be supported on React 0.13.3 or upper.

5
  • 1
    how to do this in coffescript? – vipin8169 May 13 '16 at 14:04
  • 18
    You can avoid these arrow function curly braces, also. Which I belive match the best practices: onClick={() => this.props.removeTaskFn(todo)} – sospedra Oct 5 '16 at 15:29
  • 1
    Would you please explain this a little more? I get that people keep saying it is not best practice but I would like to understand what is happening here exactly with () => I understand what an arrow function is but not what this is () and why this is bad? – wuno Jan 15 '17 at 20:21
  • @wuno The () is the parameters of your anonymous function. It's empty here because we aren't passing in any parameters. Imagine that the () is the () of function(). Now regarding why it is not best practice for binding in the render() function is because on every render, we are rebinding the function to the component, which can be very costly. – jaysonder Aug 9 '17 at 19:28
  • @LongNguyen This is what I looking for! thanks a lot – M. Wiśnicki Jan 4 '19 at 11:59
31

Instead of calling the function, bind the value to the function:

this.props.removeTaskFunction.bind(this, todo)

MDN ref: https://developer.mozilla.org/en/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_objects/Function/bind

2
  • 3
    IMHO and many others. You should favor stateless functions over clasess or binding because those can lead you into undesired side effects. Therefore, even being both of the answers correct, I believe that one is more apporpiate than the other. – sospedra Oct 5 '16 at 15:32
  • 1
    Direct binding in render or anywhere else in the component is not recommeneded. Binding should happen always in constructor – Hemadri Dasari Oct 31 '18 at 20:14
16

The value for your onClick attribute should be a function, not a function call.

<button type="submit" onClick={function(){removeTaskFunction(todo)}}>Submit</button>
1
  • 8
    Don't use anonymous functions on event calls inside render - it will trigger another render – Splynx May 17 '17 at 14:38
7

JSX is used with ReactJS as it is very similar to HTML and it gives programmers feel of using HTML whereas it ultimately transpiles to a javascript file.

Writing a for-loop and specifying function as {this.props.removeTaskFunction(todo)} will execute the functions whenever the loop is triggered .

To stop this behaviour we need to return the function to onClick.

The fat arrow function has a hidden return statement along with the bind property. Thus it returns the function to OnClick as Javascript can return functions too !!!!!

Use -

onClick={() => { this.props.removeTaskFunction(todo) }}

which means-

var onClick = function() {
  return this.props.removeTaskFunction(todo);
}.bind(this);
5

For those not using arrow functions but something simpler ... I encountered this when adding parentheses after my signOut function ...

replace this <a onClick={props.signOut()}>Log Out</a>

with this <a onClick={props.signOut}>Log Out</a> ... ! 😆

1
  • 1
    Actually that's not working for me at all. I passed down the function and never added parenthesis and it still fired on render. Not sure if this has changed since Feb '19 but assigning a function like in Long Nguyen's and Vishal Bisht's answer fixed the issue. – BitShift Feb 27 '20 at 23:20
3

JSX will evaluate JavaScript expressions in curly braces

In this case, this.props.removeTaskFunction(todo) is invoked and the return value is assigned to onClick

What you have to provide for onClick is a function. To do this, you can wrap the value in an anonymous function.

export const samepleComponent = ({todoTasks, removeTaskFunction}) => {
    const taskNodes = todoTasks.map(todo => (
                <div>
                    {todo.task}
                    <button type="submit" onClick={() => removeTaskFunction(todo)}>Submit</button>
                </div>
            );
    return (
        <div className="todo-task-list">
            {taskNodes}
        </div>
        );
    }
});
1

I had similar issue, my code was:

function RadioInput(props) {
    return (
    <div className="form-check form-check-inline">
        <input className="form-check-input" type="radio" name="inlineRadioOptions" id={props.id} onClick={props.onClick} value={props.label}></input>
        <label className="form-check-label" htmlFor={props.id}>{props.label}</label>
    </div>
    );
  }
class ScheduleType extends React.Component
{
    renderRadioInput(id,label)
    {
        id = "inlineRadio"+id;
        return(
            <RadioInput
                id = {id}
                label = {label}
                onClick = {this.props.onClick}
            />
        );

    }

Where it should be

onClick = {() => this.props.onClick()}

in RenderRadioInput

It fixed the issue for me.

0
0

That's because you are calling the function directly instead of passing the function to onClick

If you have passed down onClick={onClickHandler()} then, the function onClickHandler() will be executed during the time of rendering too, the () instructs to execute the function as soon as it is rendered , which is not desired here , instead we use onClick={onClickHandler} , this will execute the onClickHandler only when the specified event occurs. But if we want to pass down a argument along with the function then we can make use of ES6 arrow function. For your Case :

<button type="submit" onClick={() => this.props.removeTaskFunction(todo)}>Submit</button>
0

Bit late here but here is the simple answer.

direct approach will trigger by itself due to JS DOM rendering

onClick={this.props.removeTaskFunction(todo)}

anonymous arrow function approach. it will trigger on click

onClick={()=>this.props.removeTaskFunction(todo)}

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