15

If there are dates as 2010-06-01 and another as 2010-05-15

Using shell script or date command how to get the number of days between the two dates

Thanks..

1
  • 1
    python -c'from datetime import date; print(date(2010, 6, 1) - date(2010, 5, 15)).days' – jfs Aug 2 '10 at 4:53
23

Using only date and shell arithmetics:

echo $((($(date -d "2010-06-01" "+%s") - $(date -d "2010-05-15" "+%s")) / 86400))
3
  • 1
    It's not necessary to use $(()) twice. Just use a set of grouping parentheses: echo $(( ( $(date -d "2010-06-01" "+%s") - $(date -d "2010-05-15" "+%s") ) / 86400)) (optional spaces added for emphasis and readability) – Dennis Williamson Aug 2 '10 at 11:05
  • Note that %s is specific to GNU date, so it might not be available on non-Linux systems. The comp.unix.shell FAQ has a long discussion on date calculations (basically, it's hard unless you have GNU date). – Gilles 'SO- stop being evil' Aug 2 '10 at 19:21
  • In fact there's a bigger problem: it sometimes fails in the spring… My answer explains why. – Gilles 'SO- stop being evil' Aug 2 '10 at 19:32
14

There's a solution that almost works: use the %s date format of GNU date, which prints the number of seconds since 1970-01-01 00:00. These can be subtracted to find the time difference between two dates.

echo $(( ($(date -d 2010-06-01 +%s) - $(date -d 2010-05-15 +%s)) / 86400))

But the following displays 0 in some locations:

echo $((($(date -d 2010-03-29 +%s) - $(date -d 2010-03-28 +%s)) / 86400))

Because of daylight savings time, there are only 23 hours between those times. You need to add at least one hour (and at most 23) to be safe.

echo $((($(date -d 2010-03-29 +%s) - $(date -d 2010-03-28 +%s) + 43200) / 86400))

Or you can tell date to work in a timezone without DST.

echo $((($(date -u -d 2010-03-29 +%s) - $(date -u -d 2010-03-28 +%s)) / 86400))

(POSIX says to call the reference timezone is UTC, but it also says not to count leap seconds, so the number of seconds in a day is always exactly 86400 in a GMT+xx timezone.)

1
  • Your third example actually yields 82800 because you misgrouped the expression and are actually adding 0 due to the higher precedence of /, can you fix the typo? – Adrian Frühwirth May 8 '13 at 12:06
5

OSX date is different than GNU date. Got it working like this in OSX. This is not portable solution.

start_date=$(date -j -f "%Y-%m-%d" "2010-05-15" "+%s")
end_date=$(date -j -f "%Y-%m-%d" "2010-06-01" "+%s")

echo $(( ($end_date - $start_date) / (60 * 60 * 24) ))

Idea is still same as in the other answers. Convert dates to epoch time, subtract and convert result to days.

1

Got it

             d1=`date +%s -d $1`
             d2=`date +%s -d $2`
            ((diff_sec=d2-d1))
         echo - | awk -v SECS=$diff_sec '{printf "Number of days : %d",SECS/(60*60*24)}'

thanks..

1
  • 3
    If you're going to use (()) you might as well also use $() instead of backticks. Also, there's no need to pipe something into awk, just use awk ... 'BEGIN {printf ...}'. And you don't really need to use awk if it's just integer math: echo "Number of days: $(( ( d2 - d1 ) / ( 60 * 60 * 24 ) ))" – Dennis Williamson Aug 2 '10 at 11:16
0

Gnu date knows %j to display the day in year:

echo $(($(date -d 2010-06-01 +%j) - $(date -d 2010-05-15 +%j)))

crossing year-boundaries will give wrong results, but since you gave fixed dates ...

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