61

What is the best way to merge array contents from JavaScript objects sharing a key in common?

How can array in the example below be reorganized into output? Here, all value keys (whether an array or not) are merged into all objects sharing the same name key.

var array = [
    {
        name: "foo1",
        value: "val1"
    }, {
        name: "foo1",
        value: [
            "val2",
            "val3"
        ]
    }, {
        name: "foo2",
        value: "val4"
    }
];

var output = [
    {
        name: "foo1",
        value: [
            "val1",
            "val2",
            "val3"
        ]
    }, {
        name: "foo2",
        value: [
            "val4"
        ]
    }
];
6
  • 1
    is array {name:"foo1",value:"val1"} going to be {name:"foo1",value:["val1"]}?
    – BenG
    Nov 22, 2015 at 0:57
  • @BG101 no it's not an array but if that helps I can make it beforehand
    – zdebruine
    Nov 22, 2015 at 1:00
  • 1
    Have you tried using jQuery's extend() method ? Or are you trying to write your own merging script ? So something like this maybe: var newArray = $.extend({}, array, output);
    – user3186219
    Nov 22, 2015 at 1:09
  • 1
    Is there a specific way you're trying to merge the content, or would $.extend() suffice ?
    – user3186219
    Nov 22, 2015 at 1:13
  • @ZachPerkitny I'm not sure $.extend() would suffice because I do have to deal with arrays within the key values.
    – zdebruine
    Nov 22, 2015 at 1:18

15 Answers 15

69

Here is one option:-

var array = [{
  name: "foo1",
  value: "val1"
}, {
  name: "foo1",
  value: ["val2", "val3"]
}, {
  name: "foo2",
  value: "val4"
}];

var output = [];

array.forEach(function(item) {
  var existing = output.filter(function(v, i) {
    return v.name == item.name;
  });
  if (existing.length) {
    var existingIndex = output.indexOf(existing[0]);
    output[existingIndex].value = output[existingIndex].value.concat(item.value);
  } else {
    if (typeof item.value == 'string')
      item.value = [item.value];
    output.push(item);
  }
});

console.dir(output);

4
  • 3
    My key and value name are different. and I am getting confused because here the value name in input object is value and the parameter name you have taken in the forEach loop is also named value. Please make my confusion clear. Thanks. Mar 3, 2017 at 10:28
  • Sorry @ArpitMeena, only now seen your request in the comments. I've changed it to item to help in future.
    – BenG
    Oct 25, 2018 at 7:48
  • what if i have an array with multiple objects all have share one same key , but this key is unknow, for example one of the objects structure is { "127.0.0.1" : 1, "127.0.0.2" : 1, "127.0.0.3" : 1, "127.0.0.4" : 1, } and the second object { "127.0.0.1" : 1000, "127.0.0.2" : 1000, "127.0.0.3" : 1000, "127.0.0.4" : 1000, }, how to merge them so the output, be something lke this {"127.0.0.1": 1, "my-custom-key": 1000}, second obj etc..... ps the values could be different i just made a simple example. Aug 15, 2019 at 22:37
  • You are a life saver!! Sep 25, 2020 at 1:10
18

Here is another way of achieving that goal:

var array = [{
  name: "foo1",
  value: "val1"
}, {
  name: "foo1",
  value: [
    "val2",
    "val3"
  ]
}, {
  name: "foo2",
  value: "val4"
}];

var output = array.reduce(function(o, cur) {

  // Get the index of the key-value pair.
  var occurs = o.reduce(function(n, item, i) {
    return (item.name === cur.name) ? i : n;
  }, -1);

  // If the name is found,
  if (occurs >= 0) {

    // append the current value to its list of values.
    o[occurs].value = o[occurs].value.concat(cur.value);

    // Otherwise,
  } else {

    // add the current item to o (but make sure the value is an array).
    var obj = {
      name: cur.name,
      value: [cur.value]
    };
    o = o.concat([obj]);
  }

  return o;
}, []);

console.log(output);

1
  • What to do In case If I need to add the vaue as an object ? Apr 14, 2021 at 13:37
12

2021 version

var arrays = [{ name: "foo1",value: "val1" }, {name: "foo1", value: ["val2", "val3"] }, {name: "foo2",value: "val4"}];

const result = arrays.reduce((acc, {name, value}) => {
  acc[name] ??= {name: name, value: []};
  if(Array.isArray(value)) // if it's array type then concat 
    acc[name].value = acc[name].value.concat(value);
  else
    acc[name].value.push(value);
  
  return acc;
}, {});

console.log(Object.values(result));

2
  • Hi, newbie here. What does ??= mean? Sep 28 at 13:15
  • Hi @MekelIlyasa, it means logical nullish assignment. It equals checking condition if(!acc[name]) acc[name] = {name: name, value: []} Sep 28 at 16:38
10

Using lodash

var array = [{name:"foo1",value:"val1"},{name:"foo1",value:["val2","val3"]},{name:"foo2",value:"val4"}];

function mergeNames (arr) {
    return _.chain(arr).groupBy('name').mapValues(function (v) {
        return _.chain(v).pluck('value').flattenDeep();
    }).value();
}

console.log(mergeNames(array));
2
  • 3
    simplified version and also pluck now should be map : const mergeNames = arr => _.chain(arr).groupBy('name').mapValues(v => _.chain(v).map('value').flattenDeep()).value(); console.log(mergeNames(array));
    – Softmixt
    Apr 12, 2019 at 8:04
  • The data is coming in '2021-04-14': LodashWrapper { wrapped: LazyWrapper { wrapped: [LodashWrapper], actions: [Array], dir: 1, filtered: false, iteratees: [Array], takeCount: 4294967295, views: [] }, actions: [ [Object] ], chain: true, index: 0, values: undefined } this format. how to transform it in array format ? Apr 14, 2021 at 12:26
7

Here is a version using an ES6 Map:

const arrays = [{ name: "foo1",value: "val1" }, {name: "foo1", value: ["val2", "val3"] }, {name: "foo2",value: "val4"}];

const map = new Map(arrays.map(({name, value}) => [name, { name, value: [] }])); 
for (let {name, value} of arrays) map.get(name).value.push(...[value].flat());
console.log([...map.values()]);

5

Use lodash "uniqWith". As shown below

let _ = require("lodash");

var array = [
  { name: "foo1", value: "1" },
  { name: "foo1", value: "2" },
  { name: "foo2", value: "3" },
  { name: "foo1", value: "4" }
];

let merged = _.uniqWith(array, (pre, cur) => {
  if (pre.name == cur.name) {
    cur.value = cur.value + "," + pre.value;
    return true;
  }
  return false;
});

console.log(merged);
// output:  [{ name: "foo1", value: "1,2,4" }, { name: "foo2", value: "3" }];


1
  • how would I go about doing exactly this, but get the sum of foo1 values to be 7? (1+2+4)
    – Aaron
    Jun 19 at 19:52
4

Using reduce:

var mergedObj = array.reduce((acc, obj) => {
    if (acc[obj.name]) {
       acc[obj.name].value = acc[obj.name].value.isArray ? 
       acc[obj.name].value.concat(obj.value) : 
       [acc[obj.name].value].concat(obj.value);

    } else {
      acc[obj.name] = obj;
    }

    return acc;
}, {});

let output = [];
for (let prop in mergedObj) {
  output.push(mergedObj[prop]) 
}
3

Try this:

var array = [{name:"foo1",value:"val1"},{name:"foo1",value:["val2","val3"]},{name:"foo2",value:"val4"},{name:"foo2",value:"val5"}];

for(var j=0;j<array.length;j++){
  var current = array[j];
  for(var i=j+1;i<array.length;i++){
    if(current.name = array[i].name){
      if(!isArray(current.value))
        current.value = [ current.value ];
      if(isArray(array[i].value))
         for(var v=0;v<array[i].value.length;v++)
           current.value.push(array[i].value[v]);
      else
        current.value.push(array[i].value);
      array.splice(i,1);
      i++;
    }
  }
}

function isArray(myArray) {
    return myArray.constructor.toString().indexOf("Array") > -1;
}

document.write(JSON.stringify(array));

2
  • this is foolproof, but it's the traditional brute force method that I'm trying to get around.
    – zdebruine
    Nov 22, 2015 at 2:41
  • 1
    Yeah, but I did not use "endless" loops :-), I only used two loops and more importantly, I worked directly on the array variable eliminating the need for another output variable which makes it more memory efficient. However, I also liked the two answers from BG101 and Hunan, so I upvoted them. Nov 22, 2015 at 14:26
3

This work too !

      var array = [
        {
          name: "foo1",
          value: "val1",
        },
        {
          name: "foo1",
          value: ["val2", "val3"],
        },
        {
          name: "foo2",
          value: "val4",
        },
      ];
      let arr2 = [];
      array.forEach((element) => { // remove duplicate name
        let match = arr2.find((r) => r.name == element.name);
        if (match) {
        } else {
          arr2.push({ name: element.name, value: [] });
        }
      });
      arr2.map((item) => {
        array.map((e) => {
          if (e.name == item.name) {
            if (typeof e.value == "object") { //lets map if value is an object
              e.value.map((z) => {
                item.value.push(z);
              });
            } else {
              item.value.push(e.value);
            }
          }
        });
      });
      console.log(arr2);

2
  • How could you Add the values of foo1? Basically add val1, val2, and val3 into 1 value?
    – Mars2024
    Dec 1, 2021 at 21:06
  • i'm using temp arr2 to save the value, then mapping them again to see is an object, then i create an array on it, if not an object/array i push the value to it @jedLancer Dec 3, 2021 at 6:12
3

It's been a while since this question was asked, but I thought I'd chime in as well. For functions like this that execute a basic function you'll want to use over and over, I prefer to avoid longer-written functions and loops if I can help it and develop the function as a one-liner using shallow Array.prototype functions like .map() and some other ES6+ goodies like Object.entries() and Object.fromEntries(). Combining all these, we can execute a function like this relatively easily.

First, I take in however many objects you pass to the function as a rest parameter and prepend that with an empty object we'll use to collect all the keys and values.

[{}, ...objs]

Next, I use the .map() Array prototype function paired with Object.entries() to loop through all the entries of each object, and any sub-array elements each contains and then either set the empty object's key to that value if it has not yet been declared, or I push the new values to the object key if it has been declared.

[{},...objs].map((e,i,a) => i ? Object.entries(e).map(f => (a[0][f[0]] ? a[0][f[0]].push(...([f[1]].flat())) : (a[0][f[0]] = [f[1]].flat()))) : e)[0]

Finally, to replace any single-element-arrays with their contained value, I run another .map() function on the result array using both Object.entries() and Object.fromEntries(), similar to how we did before.

let getMergedObjs = (...objs) => Object.fromEntries(Object.entries([{},...objs].map((e,i,a) => i ? Object.entries(e).map(f => (a[0][f[0]] ? a[0][f[0]].push(...([f[1]].flat())) : (a[0][f[0]] = [f[1]].flat()))) : e)[0]).map(e => e.map((f,i) => i ? (f.length > 1 ? f : f[0]) : f)));

This will leave you with the final merged object, exactly as you prescribed it.

let a = {
  a: [1,9],
  b: 1,
  c: 1
}
let b = {
  a: 2,
  b: 2
}
let c = {
  b: 3,
  c: 3,
  d: 5
}

let getMergedObjs = (...objs) => Object.fromEntries(Object.entries([{},...objs].map((e,i,a) => i ? Object.entries(e).map(f => (a[0][f[0]] ? a[0][f[0]].push(...([f[1]].flat())) : (a[0][f[0]] = [f[1]].flat()))) : e)[0]).map(e => e.map((f,i) => i ? (f.length > 1 ? f : f[0]) : f)));

getMergedObjs(a,b,c); // { a: [ 1, 9, 2 ], b: [ 1, 2, 3 ], c: [ 1, 3 ], d: 5 }

2
const exampleObj = [{
  year: 2016,
  abd: 123
}, {
  year: 2016,
  abdc: 123
}, {
  year: 2017,
  abdcxc: 123
}, {
  year: 2017,
  abdcxcx: 123
}];
const listOfYears = [];
const finalObj = [];
exampleObj.map(sample => {    
  listOfYears.push(sample.year);
});
const uniqueList = [...new Set(listOfYears)];
uniqueList.map(list => {   
  finalObj.push({
    year: list
  });
});
exampleObj.map(sample => {    
  const sampleYear = sample.year;  
  finalObj.map((obj, index) => {     
    if (obj.year === sampleYear) {        
      finalObj[index] = Object.assign(sample, obj);       
    }  
  }); 
});

The final object be [{"year":2016,"abdc":123,"abd":123},{"year":2017,"abdcxcx":123,"abdcxc":123}]

1

try this :

    var array = [
      {
          name: "foo1",
          value: "val1"
      }, {
          name: "foo1",
          value: [
              "val2",
              "val3"
          ]
      }, {
          name: "foo2",
          value: "val4"
      }
  ];
  
  var output = [
      {
          name: "foo1",
          value: [
              "val1",
              "val2",
              "val3"
          ]
      }, {
          name: "foo2",
          value: [
              "val4"
          ]
      }
  ];

  bb = Object.assign( {}, array, output );

console.log(bb) ; 

0

const array = [{ name: "foo1", value: "val1" }, {name: "foo1", value: ["val2", "val3"] }, {name: "foo2", value: "val4"}];
const start = array.reduce((object, {name}) => ({...object, [name]: []}), {});
const result = array.reduce((object, {name, value}) => ({...object, [name]: [object[name], [value]].flat(2)}), start);
const output = Object.entries(result).map(([name, value]) => ({name: name, value: value}));
console.log(output);

0

A much more easier approach is this 2022:

  var array = [
        {
            name: "foo1",
            value: "val1"
        }, {
            name: "foo1",
            value: [
                "val2",
                "val3"
            ]
        }, {
            name: "foo2",
            value: "val4"
        }
    ];
    
    var output = [
        {
            name: "foo1",
            value: [
                "val1",
                "val2",
                "val3"
            ]
        },
        {
            name: "foo2",
            value: [
                "val4"
            ]
        }
    ];
    
    function mergeBasedOnKey(list){
      let c = Object.values(list.reduce((a, b) => {
    
        a[b.name] = a[b.name] || {name: b.name, value: []}
        if(typeof(b['value']) == "string"){
          a[b.name].value.push(b['value'])
        }
        else{
          a[b.name].value = [...a[b.name].value, ...b.value]
        }
    
        return a
    
      }, {}))
      return c
    }
   let ans = mergeBasedOnKey(array)
   console.log(ans)
0

I was looking for a quick, almost "one-liner" answer in this thread, provided that this is a trivial but common exercise.

I couldn't find any for my like. The other answers are fine but I am not much into boilerplate.

So, let me add one, then:

o = array.reduce((m,{name:n,value:v})=>({...m,[n]:[...m[n]||[],v].flat(1)}),{})
output = Object.entries(o).map(([n,v])=>({name:n,value:v}))

var array = [
  { name: "foo1", value: "val1"}, 
  { name: "foo1", value: ["val2","val3"] }, 
  { name: "foo2", value: "val4" }
]

o=array.reduce((m,{name:n,value:v})=>({...m,[n]:[...m[n]||[],v].flat(1)}),{})
output=Object.entries(o).map(([n,v])=>({name:n,value:v}))
    
console.log(output)

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