15

This question already has an answer here:

I have a fair bit of understanding about JavaScript scoping -- that the language has function-level scope and the variable and function declarations are hoisted to the top of their containing scope. However, I can't figure out why the following two pieces of code log different values:

This logs the value 1 to the console:

var a = 1;
function b() {
    a = 10;
    return;
    function a() {}
}
b();
console.log(a);

And mysteriously, this logs 10:

var a = 1;
function b() {
    a = 10;
    return;        
}
b();
console.log(a);

So what's going on underneath the hood?

marked as duplicate by Ed Heal, Jaromanda X, user663031 Nov 22 '15 at 9:40

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 3
    'use strict' would disallow declaring a function like in first example, so it's probably a Very Bad Idea to begin with. – transistor09 Nov 22 '15 at 9:33
  • Interesting but it's more like a design issue. – Jonatas Walker Nov 22 '15 at 9:33
13

I find the first example more mysterious...

In the second example, you do not declare a variable a inside of the function. So when you assign to a, it targets the a on the outside. Pretty straight-forward.

In the first example, you declare a variable a inside of the function, but in an unusual way: By declaring a function called a. So assigning to a will use that local "variable".

Two things to take away here:

a) Variable and function declarations are "hoisted" to the top of their scope. While function a(){} is written near the end, the variable a to hold it is already created and visible at the top of the scope.

b) Functions can be used as variables as well. You can pass functions around, you can re-assign function definitions. They share the same namespace with other variables.

1

Its because when you use a declared function it is hoisted up and turned into a function expression, ie var a = function() {}; This is creating a clash with your a variable.

1

You can use Visual-Studio for coding:

enter image description here

Programming the code in a TypeScript-File will enable you to see the variable Types by hovering the variable.

enter image description here

It will also warn you, when you try to apply the numerical-value 10 to the variable "a", that was first declared to be a function. That's what I love about TypeScript, you can get more Information about it here: http://www.typescriptlang.org/

  • Is there a warning message to go with the red line under the variable assignment? – Thilo Nov 22 '15 at 9:32
  • 2
    inlined the image for you – CupawnTae Nov 22 '15 at 9:33
  • Thank you @CupawnTae – CoderPi Nov 22 '15 at 9:43
  • Thanks, I added the warning Message @Thilo – CoderPi Nov 22 '15 at 9:44
0

JavaScript is interpreter based. Javascript {block} doesn't have a scope, but function have.

In your example,

var a = 1;
function b() {
    a = 10;
    return;
    function a() {}
}
b();
console.log(a);

first, you assign a to be integer 10, but in the end you reassign your a as a function that will be disappear at end of scope.

In this code,

var a = 1;
function b() {
    a = 10;
    return;
    function foo() {}
}
b();
console.log(a);

your a not replaced, and returned to global scope, it'll log 10.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.