19

I'm using visual studio 2015 to print two floating numbers:

double d1 = 1.5;
double d2 = 123456.789;

std::cout << "value1: " << d1 << std::endl;
std::cout << "value2: " << d2 << std::endl;

std::cout << "maximum number of significant decimal digits (value1): " << -std::log10(std::nextafter(d1, std::numeric_limits<double>::max()) - d1) << std::endl;
std::cout << "maximum number of significant decimal digits (value2): " << -std::log10(std::nextafter(d2, std::numeric_limits<double>::max()) - d2) << std::endl;

This prints the following:

value1: 1.5
value2: 123457
maximum number of significant decimal digits (value1): 15.6536
maximum number of significant decimal digits (value2): 10.8371

Why 123457 is printed out for the value 123456.789? Does ANSI C++ specification allow to display anything for floating numbers when std::cout is used without std::setprecision()?

5
  • 4
    " Does ANSI C++ specification allow to display anything for floating numbers when std::cout is used without std::setprecision()?" yes it does. Nov 22, 2015 at 12:38
  • @Hermantas, right I mean std::cout. Nov 22, 2015 at 12:42
  • @Mats, why the specification is so vague on this subject? It would help developers if the specification is more specific (like print the floating number with its significant digits). Something like printf("%.16g\n", d). Nov 22, 2015 at 12:50
  • 1
    The default precision is 6, just like for printf.
    – Bo Persson
    Nov 22, 2015 at 13:25
  • @Bo, right std::cout.precision() gives 6. So the specification is well defined. Thanks. Nov 22, 2015 at 13:46

3 Answers 3

13

What you have have pointed out is actually one of those many things that the standardization committee should consider regarding the standard iostream in C++. Such things work well when you write :-

printf ("%f\n", d2);

But not with std::cout where you need to use std::setprecision because it's formatting is similar to the use of %g instead of %f in printf. So you need to write :-

std::cout << std::setprecision(10) << "value2: " << d2 << std::endl;

But if you dont like this method & are using C++11 (& onwards) then you can also write :-

std::cout << "value2: " << std::to_string(d2) << std::endl;

This will give you the same result as printf ("%f\n", d2);.

A much better method is to cancel the rounding that occurs in std::cout by using std::fixed :-

#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>
int main()
{
    std::cout << std::fixed;
    double d = 123456.789;
    std::cout << d;
    return 0;
}

Output :-

123456.789000

So I guess your problem is solved !!

2
  • Right, printf ("%f", d) displays a floating number with 6 decimal digits. std::cout displays a floating number with a maximum of 6 digits (including digits before and after the decimal point). I was confused as I didn't know about this default precision. Now all is clear... Thanks. Nov 22, 2015 at 15:40
  • Interesting, I did not realize that float arguments to printf are actually doubles.
    – Juan
    Dec 13, 2019 at 16:16
12

The rounding off happens because of the C++ standard which can be seen by writing std::cout<<std::cout.precision();

The output screen will show 6 which tells that the default number of significant digits which will be printed by the std::cout statement is 6. That is why it automatically rounds off the floating number to 6 digits.

3

I think the problem here is that the C++ standard is not written to be easy to read, it is written to be precise and not repeat itself. So if you look up the operator<<(double), it doesn't say anything other than "it uses num_put - because that is how the cout << some_float_value is implemented.

The default behaviour is what print("%g", value); does [table 88 in n3337 version of the C++ standard explains what the equivalence of printf and c++ formatting]. So if you want to do %.16g you need to change the precision by calling setprecision(16).

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