48

I have two arrays

a = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]

b = [2, 4, 6]

I would like to merge the two arrays, then remove the values that is the same with other array. The result should be:

c = [1, 3, 5, 6]

I've tried subtracting the two array and the result is [1, 3, 5]. I also want to get the values from second array which has not duplicate from the first array..

3
  • 11
    a + b - (a & b)
    – Dmitry
    Nov 23, 2015 at 1:47
  • Thank you, way simpler than i thought.. Thank you so much!! Nov 23, 2015 at 2:01
  • 3
    ...or (a-b)+(b-a). Nov 23, 2015 at 3:33

6 Answers 6

48

Use Array#uniq.

a = [1, 3, 5, 6]
b = [2, 3, 4, 5]

c = (a + b).uniq
=> [1, 3, 5, 6, 2, 4]
4
  • 4
    I would like to merge the two arrays, then remove the values that is the same with other array. this is the problem statement...your solution would not work in this case.
    – Abhinay
    Aug 7, 2017 at 8:38
  • 2
    @Abhinay this solution is correct. it is just a different approach. unless it has worse performance it is a more obvious approach than the accepted answer.
    – wuliwong
    Oct 13, 2017 at 22:44
  • 1
    @wuliwong how is this correct if the result the are looking for is [1, 3, 5, 6] and that is not the result of this?
    – riley
    Mar 26, 2021 at 17:59
  • 1
    @wuliwong It's not a different approach, it solving a different problem, that is not what OP asked for. Removing duplicates, and removing values that are duplicated are different things. Turing [1,2,2,3] into [1,2,3] is NOT the same as [1,3]. The first removes duplicates, the second removes values that are duplicated.
    – Peter R
    Jun 21, 2022 at 22:24
42

You can do the following!

# Merging
c = a + b
 => [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 2, 4, 6]
# Removing the value of other array
# (a & b) is getting the common element from these two arrays
c - (a & b)
=> [1, 3, 5, 6]

Dmitri's comment is also same though I came up with my idea independently.

3
  • Thanks for the answer with explanation!. Nov 23, 2015 at 2:07
  • 2
    You should reference @Dmitry's earlier comment since it forms the basis for you answer (even if you came up with that independently). Nov 23, 2015 at 3:16
  • The elegance! This is why I prefer Ruby
    – Igbanam
    Apr 8, 2019 at 14:08
39

Use |

a = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
b = [2, 4, 6]

Merge without duplicating values

a | b 
# => [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]

Get only duplicate values

a & b
# => [2, 4]

Merge and remove values that were duplicated. Which means getting all unique values and subtracting all duplicate values.

(a | b) - (a & b)
# => [1, 3, 5, 6]

Ruby Docs

4
  • 3
    This is the one. Dec 18, 2020 at 17:28
  • @JoshuaPinter How is this the one? It's wrong. OP asked for values that are duplicated to be removed, NOT to remove duplicates. The answer should be [1,3,5,6] NOT [1,2,3,4,5,6].
    – Peter R
    Jun 21, 2022 at 22:25
  • Right, I have edited to get both behavior.
    – noraj
    Jun 22, 2022 at 7:59
  • @PeterR Ha, you're right! OP was asking to remove all duplicates. I was just looking to keep only 1 of any duplicates so this worked for me. Thanks for pointing this out for others. Jun 23, 2022 at 1:50
24

How about this.

(a | b)
=> [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]
(a & b)
=> [2, 4]

(a | b) - (a & b)
[1, 3, 5, 6]

Documentation for | method
Documentation for & method

4

Let's have two array

p = [1, 2, 5, 4, 8, 9]
q = [5, 6, 4, 8, 5, 3]

(p+q).uniq or (p.concat(q)).uniq

=> [1, 2, 5, 4, 8, 9, 6, 3]

Also p|q can do the job! Decide which one suits for you.

As per above requirement

(p | q) - (p & q) can do the job.

2
  • This is wrong. OP asked for values that are duplicated to be removed, NOT to remove duplicates. The answer should be [1,3,5,6] NOT [1,2,3,4,5,6].
    – Peter R
    Jun 21, 2022 at 22:26
  • In that case (p | q) - (p & q) or (p+q) - (p & q) will work!
    – V K Singh
    Jun 24, 2022 at 10:06
-1

How about Set.new([1,2,3]+[1,4,5])? Which returns [1,2,3,4,5]

1
  • [1,2,3,4,5] is not the correct result, [2,3,4,5] is.
    – Peter R
    Aug 21, 2022 at 22:02

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