2

I'm trying to map a mapping between strings and a custom struct, callable. However, it's giving me "invalid declarator". I've tried a bunch of things, like typedefing it (e.g. typdef struct _c { } callable;) but that just raises more errors.

I'm compiling with ideone.com, since I don't have a compiler at school but I still want to at least bang out decent code.

A minimum example (ideone link):

#include <vector>
#include <map>
#include <iostream>
#include <string>
using namespace std;

struct callable {
  virtual void operator()(vector<string> args) = 0;
}

std::map<std::string, callable> commands =
{
  { "cmd", struct : callable
    {
      operator()(vector<string> args) {
        out << "cmd called with args:" << endl;
        for (auto i = args.begin(); args.end() != i; ++i) out << *i << endl;
      }
    }
  }
}

int main() {
  vector<string> args = {"hello", "world"};
  commands["cd"](args);
}

And the error is:

prog.cpp:11:33: error: invalid declarator before 'commands'
 std::map<std::string, callable> commands =
                                 ^

The expected output:

cmd called with args:
hello
world

As a side note, please provide an answer to this question before answering the more general question of mapping strings to code, unless this approach can't work.

10
  • 1
    @close voter: I provided an M"W"E, expected output, the current output, and a description of the problem I'm trying to solve. Note that I don't know enough to do this another way which is theoretically shorter -- this is the shortest I could make.
    – anon
    Commented Nov 23, 2015 at 18:25
  • 1
    @UlrichEckhardt Er, what? Are you assuming that I know enough about C++ to shorten this further? Because I don't. Hence asking here. As far as I know, this is the minimum example for what I'm trying to do.
    – anon
    Commented Nov 23, 2015 at 18:26
  • 1
    @UlrichEckhardt, I feel, you are neatpicking and urge you to stop.
    – SergeyA
    Commented Nov 23, 2015 at 18:28
  • 2
    @UlrichEckhardt I. Don't. Know. If I knew C++ better, I wouldn't be asking this question, because I'd already know the answer. I'm asking this question in hopes of learning the language more, and because that one weird thing that's causing this bug could easily make other people confused, and AFAIK it's not here yet.
    – anon
    Commented Nov 23, 2015 at 18:28
  • 2
    @QPaysTaxes, your code is broken on many levels. Sorry, but you need to study core language features. Read a book.
    – SergeyA
    Commented Nov 23, 2015 at 18:29

4 Answers 4

12

You forgot the extra semicolon after struct:

struct callable {
  virtual void operator()(vector<string> args) = 0;
}; // <--- ; is needed.

This is what gives you the compiler error.

2
  • Ah, thanks! Unfortunately, this still ends up causing more errors, which are what I thought I was getting before... this is confusing.
    – anon
    Commented Nov 23, 2015 at 19:24
  • 1
    This was my problem too. Why, oh why, does g++ sometimes give a cryptic, wild-goose-chasing error instead of its usual "missing semicolon after struct declaration". (Perhaps the answer is the sheer complexity of C++'s syntax.) Commented Dec 31, 2015 at 18:20
3

Syntax issues aside, your code smells Java. In C++ where functions are first-class citizens, you do not need to create callback classess for every possible callback. Instead, you simply pass function-like objects - either a pointer to function, or something wrapped inside std::function. The former is simpler, the latter is more powerful. I suggest to work with simple pointers first. For instance, your code might be looking like following:

void do_cmd(const std::vector<std::string>& args);
typedef void (*cmd_func)(const std::vector<std::string>& cmd_args);
std::map<std::string, cmd_func> cmd_map = { {"cmd", &do_cmd} };

int main() {
   (*cmd_map["cmd"])(args);
}
14
  • Just one small improvement: Use typedef void func_type(vector<string> const& args);, i.e. don't use the (unreadable) type alias for the pointer type but rather for the function type. Then, a map<string, func_type*> is clearly a map of function pointers. Commented Nov 23, 2015 at 18:39
  • Functions are not first-class citizens in C++, though. I'd reserve that qualifications to more functional languages, such as Haskell or Lisp.
    – MicroVirus
    Commented Nov 23, 2015 at 18:39
  • OP's use of classes may indicate he wants a stateful command somewhere in his code. In that case, might a mention of functor objects and lambda expressions be useful? Commented Nov 23, 2015 at 18:41
  • @UlrichEckhardt, I find it to be the matter of personal preferences. Both approaches are viable in my view.
    – SergeyA
    Commented Nov 23, 2015 at 18:43
  • @MicroVirus, from Wikipedia: ...programming language is said to have ... functions ... as first-class citizens ... This means the language supports passing functions as arguments to other functions, returning them as the values from other functions, and assigning them to variables or storing them in data structures. All of which is possible in C/C++ with function pointers.
    – SergeyA
    Commented Nov 23, 2015 at 18:45
2

callable is an abstract base class and can't be instantiated. Thus, you can't store an instance of one in a map. You can store a pointer to a ABC in a map, but don't use a raw pointer use a smart one, such as below:

std::map<std::string, std::unique_ptr<callable> > 
1

I think you just lack a ';' after the closing brace of the struct declaration...

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