4

So, I'm learning C and I'm currently going through Computer Systems: A Programmer's Perspective 3rd Edition and associated labs. I'm now doing the first lab for which I have to implement (and have thus implemented) the following function.

/* 
* fitsBits - return 1 if x can be represented as an 
*  n-bit, two's complement integer.
*   1 <= n <= 32
*   Examples: fitsBits(5,3) = 0, fitsBits(-4,3) = 1
*   Legal ops: ! ~ & ^ | + << >>
*   Max ops: 15
*   Rating: 2
*/
int fitsBits(int x, int n) {
  int sign_bit = (x >> 31 & 1);
  int minus_one = ~1+1;
  int n_minus_one = n + minus_one;
  return  (!(x >> n_minus_one) & !sign_bit)
           | (!(~(x >> n_minus_one)) & sign_bit);
}

This function will run _a_lot_ of testcases against the following test function.

int test_fitsBits(int x, int n)
{
  int TMin_n = -(1 << (n-1));
  int TMax_n = (1 << (n-1)) - 1;
  return x >= TMin_n && x <= TMax_n;
}

Now, here is where the weird stuff happens: by default the code is compiled with the following flags -O -Wall -m32

Running my code against the test function produces the following assertion fail: ERROR: Test fitsBits(-2147483648[0x80000000],32[0x20]) failed... ...Gives 1[0x1]. Should be 0[0x0]

It seems that my code is correct and the testcode is bogus. Upon further investigation it seems that the test_function produces following intermediary results:

> Tmin:-2147483648 
> TMax_n:2147483647 
> x: -2147483648 
> x >= TMin_n: 1
> x <= TMax_n: 0
> result: 0

Obviously -2147483648 <= 2147483647, but the comparison somehow produces a 0.

If I compile this program without the -O flag, all the tests pass successfully. Can somebody shed some light on this behaviour please?

EDIT: Sorry the Assembly Code is horrible layout, don't know exactly how to fix quickly

Assembly Code without -O;

.section    __TEXT,__text,regular,pure_instructions
.macosx_version_min 10, 11
.globl  _test_fitsBits
.align  4, 0x90
_test_fitsBits:                         ## @test_fitsBits
.cfi_startproc
## BB#0:
pushq   %rbp
Ltmp0:
.cfi_def_cfa_offset 16
Ltmp1:
.cfi_offset %rbp, -16
movq    %rsp, %rbp
Ltmp2:
.cfi_def_cfa_register %rbp
xorl    %eax, %eax
movb    %al, %cl
movl    $1, %eax
xorl    %edx, %edx
movl    %edi, -4(%rbp)
movl    %esi, -8(%rbp)
movl    -8(%rbp), %esi
subl    $1, %esi
movb    %cl, -17(%rbp)          ## 1-byte Spill
movl    %esi, %ecx
                                    ## kill: CL<def> ECX<kill>
movl    %eax, %esi
shll    %cl, %esi
subl    %esi, %edx
movl    %edx, -12(%rbp)
movl    -8(%rbp), %edx
subl    $1, %edx
movl    %edx, %ecx
                                    ## kill: CL<def> ECX<kill>
shll    %cl, %eax
subl    $1, %eax
movl    %eax, -16(%rbp)
movl    -4(%rbp), %eax
cmpl    -12(%rbp), %eax
movb    -17(%rbp), %cl          ## 1-byte Reload
movb    %cl, -18(%rbp)          ## 1-byte Spill
jl  LBB0_2
## BB#1:
movl    -4(%rbp), %eax
cmpl    -16(%rbp), %eax
setle   %cl
movb    %cl, -18(%rbp)          ## 1-byte Spill
LBB0_2:
movb    -18(%rbp), %al          ## 1-byte Reload
andb    $1, %al
movzbl  %al, %eax
popq    %rbp
retq
.cfi_endproc

.globl  _main
.align  4, 0x90
_main:                                  ## @main
.cfi_startproc
## BB#0:
pushq   %rbp
Ltmp3:
.cfi_def_cfa_offset 16
Ltmp4:
.cfi_offset %rbp, -16
movq    %rsp, %rbp
Ltmp5:
.cfi_def_cfa_register %rbp
xorl    %eax, %eax
movl    $0, -4(%rbp)
movl    %edi, -8(%rbp)
movq    %rsi, -16(%rbp)
popq    %rbp
retq
.cfi_endproc


.subsections_via_symbols

Assembly Code with -O:

.section    __TEXT,__text,regular,pure_instructions
.macosx_version_min 10, 11
.globl  _test_fitsBits
.align  4, 0x90
_test_fitsBits:                         ## @test_fitsBits
.cfi_startproc
## BB#0:
pushq   %rbp
Ltmp0:
.cfi_def_cfa_offset 16
Ltmp1:
.cfi_offset %rbp, -16
movq    %rsp, %rbp
Ltmp2:
.cfi_def_cfa_register %rbp
                                    ## kill: ESI<def> ESI<kill>       RSI<def>
leal    -1(%rsi), %ecx
movl    $1, %eax
                                    ## kill: CL<def> CL<kill> ECX<kill>
shll    %cl, %eax
movl    %eax, %ecx
negl    %ecx
cmpl    %edi, %eax
setg    %al
cmpl    %ecx, %edi
setge   %cl
andb    %al, %cl
movzbl  %cl, %eax
popq    %rbp
retq
.cfi_endproc

.globl  _main
.align  4, 0x90
_main:                                  ## @main
.cfi_startproc
## BB#0:
pushq   %rbp
Ltmp3:
.cfi_def_cfa_offset 16
Ltmp4:
.cfi_offset %rbp, -16
movq    %rsp, %rbp
Ltmp5:
.cfi_def_cfa_register %rbp
xorl    %eax, %eax
popq    %rbp
retq
.cfi_endproc


.subsections_via_symbols
  • 2
    Can you use gcc -S to output assembly code, then post the assembly code for test_fitsBits? – immibis Nov 23 '15 at 21:20
  • 1
    How wide is int on your platform? What's the value range for n? Remember it's undefined behaviour to have the right operand of the left shift operator negative or greater than or equal to the width of the promoted left operand. – Michael Foukarakis Nov 23 '15 at 21:29
  • 1
    int is 32bit, but I'm on a 64 bit platform. These are the values for INT_MAX and INT_MIN when printed from limits.h: 2147483647 -2147483648. – Mathieu Borderé Nov 23 '15 at 21:33
  • @immibis : Assembly code added – Mathieu Borderé Nov 23 '15 at 21:38
4

oauh's answer addresses why this is undefined behaviour, but not why the problem only appears with -O.

-O makes the compiler try harder to find things to optimize. In this case, it seems to have realised that x <= (1 << (n-1)) - 1 is really the same as x < (1 << (n-1)) - so it's been able to delete the - 1.

However, this is only equivalent to the old code if 1 << (n-1) doesn't overflow. The compiler does this optimization anyway, because the result is allowed to be wrong if overflow happens - which is because anything is allowed if overflow happens, because it's undefined behaviour.

7
int TMin_n = -(1 << (n-1));
int TMax_n = (1 << (n-1)) - 1;

On a system with 32-bit int the two bitwise shift expressions above invoke undefined behavior when n is 32. When int is 32-bit then 1 << 31 is UB in C as 1 << 31 is not representable in a int.

  • Thanks for your answer. I had seen the compiler warning about the overflow, but I want to understand why the -O flag has the observed effect. – Mathieu Borderé Nov 23 '15 at 21:30
  • 1
    It might be worth pointing out that "undefined behavior" really means that anything can happen. So even if the value is printed correctly at one point, that doesn't mean that the correct value is used in calculations etc. When it comes to optimization, all bets are off. The optimizer could just think, "what the heck, we are doing undefined stuff here, let's just finish as fast as possible". – matli Nov 23 '15 at 21:30
  • Negating INT_MIN or subtracting 1 from it are also undefined, so fixing the shift alone isn't going to be enough. – user2357112 Nov 23 '15 at 21:38
  • 1
    @MathieuBorderé it is undefined behavior and the compiler is taking two approaches depending on the optimization option used which is quiet common when there is undefined behavior. – ouah Nov 23 '15 at 21:44
  • 1
    @MathieuBorderé basically without optimization option the compiler is in -O0 mode and usually do wrap around for overflow, add -fwrapv (this forces wrap around on signed arithmetic overflow) to -O and you may get the same result as with -O0 (or no optimization option). – ouah Nov 23 '15 at 21:47
1

As pointed out by @ouah, your code is using undefined behavior. Rather than make questionable things errors, C tends to say their behavior is "undefined". This means the compiler can do whatever it wants. Most compilers will try to do what you mean, but others have interpreted "undefined behavior" more liberally and decided you really wanted to play a game of Rogue.

-O tells the compiler to spend some extra time trying to optimize your code. This changes how the compiler translates your C code into machine code. It's going to make less assumptions about the code to try and transform it into a more efficient, but equivalent, version. Any undefined behavior that happened to be working before might now break. Conversely, your code might work fine with -O and break when you turn it off. Or -g might break it. Or running your code in the debugger. Or adding a printf. Or a stiff breeze.

These sorts of bugs that appear and disappear have a name, heisenbugs after the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle which says observing a system changes a system.

This is why it's important to turn on all your compiler's warning flags (-Wall is not everything, clang has -Weverything) and eliminate them all. Another tool which helps catch these sorts of memory problems is Valgrind.

0

Change test.c file:

int test_fitsBits(int x, int n) {
    int TMin_n, TMax_n;
    if (n < 32) {
      TMin_n = -(1 << (n-1));
      TMax_n = (1 << (n-1)) - 1;
    } else {
      TMin_n = 0x80000000;
      TMax_n = ~TMin_n;
    }
      return x >= TMin_n && x <= TMax_n;
}

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