6

I'd like to iterate over the keys of a dictionary, sorted first by value (descending), and then by key (ascending)
let dict = ["foo" : 1, "bar" : 1, "baz" : 2, "qux" : 2]

The order of the iteration should be:
["baz", "qux", "bar", "foo"]

I'd like to print:

baz 2
qux 2
bar 1
foo 1
9

Xcode 8 beta 6 • Swift 3 • Swift 4

extension Dictionary where Value: Comparable {
    var valueKeySorted: [(Key, Value)] {
        return sorted{ if $0.value != $1.value { return $0.value > $1.value } else { return String(describing: $0.key) < String(describing: $1.key) } }
    }
}

let dict = ["foo" : 1, "bar" : 1, "baz" : 2, "qux" : 2]

let keyValueArray = dict.valueKeySorted

print(keyValueArray)   // "[("baz", 2), ("qux", 2), ("bar", 1), ("foo", 1)]"

for (key, value) in keyValueArray {
    print(key, value)
}


Xcode 2.x

let keyValueArray = dict.sort{ $0.0 < $1.0 }.sort{ $0.1 > $1.1}
print(keyValueArray)  // [(.0 "baz", .1 2), (.0 "qux", .1 2), (.0 "bar", .1 1), (.0 "foo", .1 1)]

You can also create an extension where dictionaries values are comparable:

extension Dictionary where Value: Comparable {
    var valueKeySorted: [(Key, Value)] {
        return sort{ $0.1 > $1.1 }.sort{ String($0.0) < String($1.0) }
    }
    // or sorting as suggested by Just Another Coder without using map
    var valueKeySorted2: [(Key, Value)] {
        return sort{ if $0.1 != $1.1 { return $0.1 > $1.1 } else { return String($0.0) < String($1.0) } }
    }


}

usage:

let dict = ["foo" : 1, "bar" : 1, "baz" : 2, "qux" : 2]

let keyValueArray = dict.valueKeySorted

print(keyValueArray)   // "[("baz", 2), ("qux", 2), ("bar", 1), ("foo", 1)]"

If you would like to iterate over keyValueArray of tuples

for (key, value) in keyValueArray {
    print(key, value)
}
4
  • 2
    That's an awesome one-liner. Nov 23 '15 at 22:58
  • 1
    @ChrisKoknat I think the best would be let keyValueArray = dict.sort { $0.1 != $1.1 ? $0.1 > $1.1 : $0.0 < $1.0 }
    – Leo Dabus
    Nov 23 '15 at 23:57
  • Best because one call to sort is faster than two? Nov 24 '15 at 0:10
  • 1
    Thanks, it save a lot of time!
    – Svitlana
    Jun 18 '16 at 19:05
2

Try this:

let dict = ["foo" : 1, "bar" : 1, "baz" : 2, "qux" : 2]

let result = dict.map { (key: $0.0, value: $0.1) }
                 .sort { 
                    if $0.value != $1.value {
                        return $0.value > $1.value
                    }
                    return $0.key < $1.key
                  }

for r in result {
    print("\(r.key) \(r.value)")
}

map transforms the dictionary into an array of tuples (key: "foo", value: 1) etc. It then becomes a matter of sorting that array with sort.

3
  • No need use map. You can do it apply sort directly to your dictionary.
    – Leo Dabus
    Nov 23 '15 at 22:47
  • 1
    Yes, you are right. But I prefer my data structures to have proper names rather then referring to them by their positional value. Hence the map Nov 23 '15 at 22:48
  • Gives the following error Cannot use mutating member on immutable value: function call Sep 14 '18 at 8:30

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