42

I was trying to accomplish this border for two divs with CSS:

Desired result

I tried just using border-radius, but the two partial circles aren't pressed together: http://jsfiddle.net/uwz6L79w/

 .left {
   position: absolute;
   left: 0;
   top: 0;
   width: 100px;
   height: 100px;
   border-width: 4px;
   border-color: black white black black;
   border-style: solid;
   border-radius: 60px
 }
 .right {
   position: absolute;
   left: 104px;
   top: 0;
   width: 100px;
   height: 100px;
   border-width: 4px;
   border-color: black black black white;
   border-style: solid;
   border-radius: 60px;
 }
<div class="left"></div>
<div class="right"></div>

I could just press them together further, but I'd have to have one div overlap the other, like this: http://jsfiddle.net/uwz6L79w/1/.

.left {
  position: absolute;
  left: 0;
  top: 0;
  width: 100px;
  height: 100px;
  border-width: 4px;
  border-color: black white black black;
  border-style: solid;
  border-radius: 60px
}
.right {
  position: absolute;
  left: 70px;
  top: 0;
  width: 100px;
  height: 100px;
  border-width: 4px;
  border-color: black black black white;
  border-style: solid;
  border-radius: 60px;
  background: #f2f2f2;
}
<div class="left"></div>
<div class="right"></div>

Does anyone know how I could accomplish this without having the divs overlap?

  • 2
    Yes, it is possible. Give a look at this link and try to scratch the infinity. – AndreaM16 Nov 24 '15 at 8:26
  • You can also do this with pseudo elements overlap. – Manoj Kumar Nov 24 '15 at 8:29
  • Your second snippet works fine for me. Can you provide a screenshot of how it looks to you, and what browser you are using? – Bergi Nov 25 '15 at 5:32
  • @Bergi: OP didn't want it to overlap. That is, if you add a background to one of the div, you'd see that they have positioned part of the second div on top of the first. – Harry Nov 25 '15 at 5:39
  • @Harry: Yeah, but the example doesn't have a background, so I wasn't sure where the problem was. Maybe there's a better way to solve the problem than avoiding overlap? – Bergi Nov 25 '15 at 5:48
46

SVG

This is also possible using SVG.

The SVG version is very short as it mainly only requires an Arc command to control its shape, size and position.

<svg width="50%" viewbox="0 0 100 50">
  <path d="M50,35 
           a20,20 0 1,0 0,-20 
           a20,20 0 1,0 0,20z" 
        fill="white" 
        stroke="black">
  </path>
</svg>

SVG stands for Scalable Vector Graphic. The web browser views it as an image but you can add text and normal HTML elements within an SVG.

It is well supported across all browsers as viewable here: CanIUse

  • 1
    You could get a much neater join between them by using just one path element. – Anko Nov 24 '15 at 13:40
  • @Anko not a clue why i didnt think of that in the first place :P. Cheers for the suggestion and amended my answer :) – Stewartside Nov 24 '15 at 13:48
41

Using Borders: Recommended

You could do it the same way as in your second snippet and use positioning like in the below snippet to avoid the two div elements from overlapping. Here the circles are produced by pseudo-elements and the overlapping part is cut out using overflow: hidden on their parents.

One thing to note here is that any hover effect should be added on the pseudo-elements and not the parent elements. This is because if the :hover is attached to parent then it would be triggered even when hovering outside the circle (because the parent is still a square).

Out of all the three solutions provided in this answer, this is the one that has the best browser support and would work even in IE8. Hence, this is the recommended one.

.left, .right {
  position: relative;
  float: left;
  height: 200px;
  width: 200px;
  /* border: 1px solid; uncomment to see that they aren't overlapped */
  overflow: hidden;
}
.left:after, .right:after {
  position: absolute;
  content: '';
  height: calc(100% - 12px); /* 12px because of 6px border on either side */
  width: calc(100% - 12px); /* 12px because of 6px border on either side */
  border-radius: 50%;
  border: 6px solid gray;
}
.left:after { right: -20px; }
.right:after { left: -20px; }
<div class='left'></div>
<div class='right'></div>


Using Radial Gradients:

If you don't want to use pseudo-elements and a overflow: hidden on the parent then you could also make use of radial-gradient background images to produce the circle and position them such that they end up producing the required effect. Below is a sample snippet for this approach.

The downside of this approach is the low browser support for radial-gradient. It would not work in IE9 and lower. Plus, the circles produced by radial gradients are generally jagged (rough edges) and when we modify the color stop positions to make it smoother, it gives a slightly blurred appearance.

.left, .right {
  float: left;
  height: 200px;
  width: 200px;
  /*border: 1px solid;  uncomment to see that they aren't overlapped */
}

/* generally the below code should be enough to produce 6px thick circular border
.left {
  background: radial-gradient(circle at 70% 50%, transparent calc(50% - 3px), gray calc(50% - 3px), gray calc(50% + 3px), transparent calc(50% + 3px));
}
.right {
  background: radial-gradient(circle at 30% 50%, transparent calc(50% - 3px), gray calc(50% - 3px), gray calc(50% + 3px), transparent calc(50% + 3px));
}
*/

/* but it produces jagged edges and so we can change the color stops a bit like below
   this produces smoother circles but the disadvantage is that they'd look a bit blurred */
.left {
  background: radial-gradient(circle at 70% 50%, transparent calc(50% - 4px), gray calc(50% - 2px), gray calc(50% + 2px), transparent calc(50% + 4px));
}
.right {
  background: radial-gradient(circle at 30% 50%, transparent calc(50% - 4px), gray calc(50% - 2px), gray calc(50% + 2px), transparent calc(50% + 4px));
}
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/prefixfree/1.0.7/prefixfree.min.js"></script>
<div class='left'></div>
<div class='right'></div>


Using Clip Paths (CSS/SVG):

Another approach that could be used is to use clip-path. The advantage of this approach is that the hover effects would be triggered only when the cursor is within the circle (as can be seen in snippet). This is because the unnecessary portions are clipped.

Downside is again the poor browser support. CSS version of clip-path is supported only in Webkit but not in Firefox, IE whereas the SVG version (using inline SVG) is supported in Webkit, Firefox but not IE.

.left, .right {
  float: left;
  height: 200px;
  width: 200px;
  border-radius: 50%;
  border: 6px solid gray;
}

/* CSS Clip Path - not supported by FF and IE */
.left.css-clip {
  clip-path: polygon(0% 0%, 80% 0%, 80% 100%, 0% 100%);
}
.right.css-clip {
  margin-left: -86px;  /* 20% width * 2 (which is the clipped space) - border width */
  clip-path: polygon(20% 0%, 100% 0%, 100% 100%, 20% 100%);
}

/* SVG Clip Path - supported by Webkit, FF but not IE */
.left.svg-clip {
  clip-path: url(#clipper-left);
}
.right.svg-clip {
  margin-left: -86px;  /* 20% width * 2 (which is the clipped space) - border width */
  clip-path: url(#clipper-right);
}

/* Just for demo */

h3{ clear: both; }
.left:hover, .right:hover{ background: red; }
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/prefixfree/1.0.7/prefixfree.min.js"></script>

<h3>CSS Clip Path</h3>
<div class='left css-clip'></div>
<div class='right css-clip'></div>

<h3>SVG Clip Path</h3>
<div class='left svg-clip'></div>
<div class='right svg-clip'></div>

<!-- Inline SVG for SVG Clip Path -->
<svg width='0' height='0'>
  <defs>
    <clipPath id='clipper-left' clipPathUnits='objectBoundingBox'>
      <path d='M0,0 .8,0 .8,1 0,1z' />
      </clipPath>
    <clipPath id='clipper-right' clipPathUnits='objectBoundingBox'>
      <path d='M.2,0 1,0 1,1 .2,1z' />
      </clipPath>
    </defs>
  </svg>

  • The second solution has rough edges, do you know if there is a way to solve this? – jaunt Nov 24 '15 at 9:25
  • 1
    @jaunt: It could be reduced to some extent by adjusting the color stop percentages of the gradient but I don't think we can get rid of it completely. – Harry Nov 24 '15 at 9:50
  • 1
    @jaunt: I've updated the second solution to produce a bit more smoother circle (changed the color stop percentages) but that seems to be the max we can do with radial gradients. – Harry Nov 24 '15 at 11:08
  • 1
    Ah okay I see what you were saying now, that does look better tho imo – jaunt Nov 24 '15 at 11:46
  • 1
    @slebetman: To draw circles - yes. But I am not drawing circles there. I am adapting user's circles created using borders to overcome the not overlap and clipping the unnecessary part is one way to achieve it while still retaining the OPs original work. – Harry Nov 25 '15 at 9:52
12

Here's a solution using just a single <div>.

  1. .shape is a transparent circle with a 10px red border.
  2. .shape::before is an opaque white circle with a 10px red border.
  3. .shape::after is an opaque white circle (no border).

.shape {
margin: 6px auto;
}

.shape, .shape::before, .shape::after {
display: block;
position: relative;
width: 160px;
height: 160px;
border-radius: 160px;
}

.shape, .shape::before {
border: 10px solid #f00;
}

.shape::before, .shape::after {
content: "";
background-color: rgba(255, 255, 255, 1);
}

.shape::before {
top: -10px;
left: -150px;
}

.shape::after {
top: -180px;
}
<div class="shape"></div>

  • 1
    Instead of rgba(255, 255, 255, 1), you should use #FFF, #FFFFFF, white or rgb(255, 255, 255). Since you are specifying a color with with no opacity, there's no need for rgba. It may make the browser work a bit harder for nothing. To ease IE8 support, you could use :before and :after. There are lots of libraries to add support to rounded borders on IE8. But, other that that, your solution works (with the mentioned changes) even on IE8!!! (except the rounded border). This one is far superior than the SVG solutions! – Ismael Miguel Nov 25 '15 at 9:40
  • @IsmaelMiguel: I am not sure if you were comparing only with the SVG or with all other answers on this thread but both Jeff's and the first snippet in my answer would also work in IE8. If you didn't compare with them, please excuse me. – Harry Nov 25 '15 at 10:25
  • 2
    @Harry Oh, no. I was just comparing the SVG-only solutions. Also, this is slightly superior to other answers, since it reduces the amount of empty elements. Some persons are really strict about empty tags. But this works fine on a <span> as well. Nobody complains about an empty <span>, right? – Ismael Miguel Nov 25 '15 at 12:18
  • Fair point mate. I went with two div elements purely because OP said this in question - border for two divs. Am assuming that they already have two div and just wanted the border to be set this way. – Harry Nov 25 '15 at 12:20
  • 1
    @Rounin: I like your answer and there is absolutely nothing wrong with it. Your answer does add value. – Harry Nov 25 '15 at 12:31
8

Here's a quick example I came up with. I haven't tested it in different browsers but it should be fairly well-supported.

HTML:

<div class="one"></div>
<div class="two"></div>

CSS:

div {
  background: #fff;
  border-radius: 50%;
  float: left;
  height: 100px;
  position: relative;
  width: 100px;
}

.one:after,
.two:after{
  /* adjust this to set the border color */
  background: #666;
  border-radius: 50%;
  content: "";
  position: absolute;
  z-index: -1;
  /* adjust these to set the border width */
  top: -5px;
  right: -5px;
  bottom: -5px;
  left: -5px;
}

.two {
  /* adjust this to set the overlap of the circles */
  margin-left: -20px;
}

Live Demo

2

I'm coming back to this question (after 6 weeks), purely because the top-voted answer piqued my academic curiosity in svg, which I've rarely come across and never taken the time to learn.

Since I'm now learning svg, this question (which sent me off on my quest to learn it in the first place) seemed like the ideal challenge against which to try out some new skills.

So here is an alternative svg solution, the equivalent of my single <div> css solution above:

svg {
width: 310px;
height: 180px;
}

svg circle {
stroke: rgb(255,0,0);
stroke-width: 10;
fill: rgb(255,255,255);
}

svg circle:nth-of-type(3) {
stroke: rgb(255,255,255);
}
<svg viewbox="0 0 310 180">
<circle cx="90" cy="90" r="80" />
<circle cx="220" cy="90" r="80" />
<circle cx="90" cy="90" r="70" />
</svg>

  • Do have to say thats a very nice addition :). Good work +1 – Stewartside Jan 22 '16 at 11:20

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