140

I am working on a nested flexbox layout which should work as follows:

The outermost level (ul#main) is a horizontal list that must expand to the right when more items are added to it. If it grows too big, there should be a horizontal scroll bar.

#main {
    display: flex;
    flex-direction: row;
    flex-wrap: nowrap;
    overflow-x: auto;
    /* ...and more... */
}

Each item of this list (ul#main > li) has a header (ul#main > li > h2) and an inner list (ul#main > li > ul.tasks). This inner list is vertical and should wrap into columns when needed. When wrapping into more columns, its width should increase to make room for more items. This width increase should apply also to the containing item of the outer list.

.tasks {
    flex-direction: column;
    flex-wrap: wrap;
    /* ...and more... */
}

My problem is that the inner lists don't wrap when the height of the window gets too small. I have tried lots of tampering with all the flex properties, trying to follow the guidelines at CSS-Tricks meticulously, but no luck.

This JSFiddle shows what I have so far.

Expected result (what I want):

My desired output

Actual result (what I get):

My current output

Older result (what I got in 2015):

My older output

UPDATE

After some investigation, this is beginning to look like a bigger issue. All major browsers behave the same way, and it has nothing to do with my flexbox design being nested. Even simpler flexbox column layouts refuse to increase the list's width when the items wrap.

This other JSFiddle clearly demonstrates the problem. In current versions of Chrome, Firefox and IE11, all items wrap correctly; the list's height increases in row mode, but its width does not increase in column mode. Also, there is no immediate reflow of elements at all when changing the height of a column mode, but there is in row mode.

However, the official specs (look specifically at example 5) seem to indicate that what I want to do should be possible.

Can someone come up with a workaround to this problem?

UPDATE 2

After a lot of experimenting using JavaScript to update the height and width of various elements during resize events, I have come to the conclusion that it is too complex and too much trouble to try to solve it that way. Also, adding JavaScript definitely breaks the flexbox model, which should be kept as clean as possible.

For now, I'm falling back to overflow-y: auto instead of flex-wrap: wrap so that the inner container scrolls vertically when needed. It is not pretty, but it is one way forward that at least does not break useability too much.

  • 2
    Just a sidenote, but there's a bug in Chrome that causes a container with it's flow set to column wrap not to expand it's width when wrapping. See code.google.com/p/chromium/issues/detail?id=247963 for more information. – Gerrit Bertier Nov 24 '15 at 12:18
  • I can't get it to work in IE11 either. There, the innermost items wrap, but the inner list and its container (the outer item) do not increase their width. Currently I'm falling back to having the inner lists scroll, but it is not a good long-term solution, and I would really like to avoid adding JavaScript for this. – Anders Tornblad Nov 24 '15 at 12:37
148
+100

The Problem

This looks like a fundamental deficiency in flex layout.

A flex container in column-direction will not expand to accommodate additional columns. (This is not a problem in flex-direction: row.)

This question has been asked many times (see list below), with no clean answers in CSS.

It's hard to pin this as a bug because the problem occurs across all major browsers. But it does raise the question:

How is it possible that all major browsers got the flex container to expand on wrap in row-direction but not in column-direction?

You would think at least one of them would get it right. I can only speculate on the reason. Maybe it was a technically difficult implementation and was shelved for this iteration.

UPDATE: The issue appears to be resolved in Edge v16.


Illustration of the Problem

The OP created a useful demo illustrating the problem. I'm copying it here: http://jsfiddle.net/nwccdwLw/1/


Workaround Options

Hacky solutions from the Stack Overflow community:


More Analysis


Other Posts Describing the Same Problem

  • 1
    According to the bug report comments, this issue won't be fixed until they release their new layout engine LayoutNG – Ben.12 Feb 26 '18 at 14:58
  • 4
    The number of links you provided and categorized them is really great. I wish most people write answers this way. Great answer. – Vignesh Mar 2 '18 at 5:34
  • 4
    Here's a useful repo listing out several Flexbox bugs and workarounds for them: This bug is listed at #14 – Ben.12 Mar 7 '18 at 18:50
  • can we fix this issue by using a CSS grid? – Ismail Farooq Apr 12 at 6:46
  • @Ben.12 Thanks ben. – Shashank Bhatt May 24 at 12:53
12

Late to the party, but was still running into this issue YEARS later. Ended up finding a solution using grid. On the container you can use

display: grid;
grid-auto-flow: column;
grid-template-rows: repeat(6, auto);

I have an example on CodePen that toggles between the flexbox issue and the grid fix: https://codepen.io/MandeeD/pen/JVLdLd

  • 1
    That's an elegant workaround if I've ever seen one! I'm just getting into grid and I love your solution, thank you for this. – Albert Jul 22 at 6:45
-1

Since no solution or proper workaround was suggested yet, I managed to obtain the requested behavior with a little different approach. Instead of separating the layout into 3 different divs, I'm adding all the items into 1 div and creating the separation with some more divs in between.

The proposed solution is hard coded, assuming we have 3 sections, but can be extended to a generic one. The main idea is to explain how we can achieve this layout.

  1. Adding all the items into 1 container div that uses flex to wrap the items
  2. The first item of each "inner container" (I'll call it a section) will have a class, which helps us to do some manipulations that create the separation and styling of each section.
  3. Using :before on each first item, we can locate the title of each section.
  4. Using space creates the gap between the sections
  5. Since the space won't cover the full height of the section I'm also adding :after to the sections so positioning it with absolute position and white background.
  6. To style the background color of each section I'm adding another div inside the first item of each section. I will be position with absolute as well and will have z-index: -1.
  7. To get the correct width of each background, I'm using JS, setting the correct width, and also adding a listener to resize.

function calcWidth() {
  var size = $(document).width();
  var end = $(".end").offset().left;

  var todoWidth = $(".doing-first").offset().left;
  $(".bg-todo").css("width", todoWidth);

  var doingWidth = $(".done-first").offset().left - todoWidth;
  $(".bg-doing").css("width", doingWidth);

  var doneWidth = $(".end").offset().left - $(".done-first").offset().left;
  $(".bg-done").css("width", doneWidth + 20);

}

calcWidth();

$(window).resize(function() {
  calcWidth();
});
.container {
  display: flex;
  flex-wrap: wrap;
  flex-direction: column;
  height: 120px;
  align-content: flex-start;
  padding-top: 30px;
  overflow-x: auto;
  overflow-y: hidden;
}

.item {
  width: 200px;
  background-color: #e5e5e5;
  border-radius: 5px;
  height: 20px;
  margin: 5px;
  position: relative;
  box-shadow: 1px 1px 5px 0px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.75);
  padding: 5px;
}

.space {
  height: 150px;
  width: 10px;
  background-color: #fff;
  margin: 10px;
}

.todo-first:before {
  position: absolute;
  top: -30px;
  height: 30px;
  content: "To Do (2)";
  font-weight: bold;
}

.doing-first:before {
  position: absolute;
  top: -30px;
  height: 30px;
  content: "Doing (5)";
  font-weight: bold;
}

.doing-first:after,
.done-first:after {
  position: absolute;
  top: -35px;
  left: -25px;
  width: 10px;
  height: 180px;
  z-index: 10;
  background-color: #fff;
  content: "";
}

.done-first:before {
  position: absolute;
  top: -30px;
  height: 30px;
  content: "Done (3)";
  font-weight: bold;
}

.bg-todo {
  position: absolute;
  background-color: #FFEFD3;
  width: 100vw;
  height: 150px;
  top: -30px;
  left: -10px;
  z-index: -1;
}

.bg-doing {
  position: absolute;
  background-color: #EFDCFF;
  width: 100vw;
  height: 150px;
  top: -30px;
  left: -15px;
  z-index: -1;
}

.bg-done {
  position: absolute;
  background-color: #DCFFEE;
  width: 10vw;
  height: 150px;
  top: -30px;
  left: -15px;
  z-index: -1;
}

.end {
  height: 150px;
  width: 10px;
}
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<div class="container">

  <div class="item todo-first">
    <div class="bg-todo"></div>
    Drink coffee
  </div>
  <div class="item">Go to work</div>

  <div class="space"></div>

  <div class="item doing-first">
    <div class="bg-doing"></div>
    1
  </div>
  <div class="item">2</div>
  <div class="item">3</div>
  <div class="item">4</div>
  <div class="item">5</div>

  <div class="space"></div>

  <div class="item done-first">
    <div class="bg-done"></div>
    1
  </div>
  <div class="item">2</div>
  <div class="item">3</div>

  <div class="end"></div>

</div>

-2

Possible JS solution..

var ul = $("ul.ul-to-fix");

if(ul.find("li").length>{max_possible_rows)){
    if(!ul.hasClass("width-calculated")){
        ul.width(ul.find("li").eq(0).width()*ul.css("columns"));
        ul.addClass("width-calculated");
     }
}
  • That would not help, unfortunately, as the heights of individual elements can vary. So the number of elements is not interesting... But using the columns style property could be a starting point for a working solution. Maybe adjusting the number of columns and the width of the ul. – Anders Tornblad Sep 6 '17 at 9:42
  • 1
    I also ended up going with a JS solution to this problem for a React application I have been working on. It is designed to work with elements of any and varying size. Example here: djskinner.github.io/react-column-wrap. Source code here: github.com/djskinner/react-column-wrap – djskinner Oct 12 '17 at 14:15

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