66

I know that SQL's CASE syntax is as follows:

CASE
    WHEN search_condition THEN statement_list
    [WHEN search_condition THEN statement_list] ...
    [ELSE statement_list]
END CASE

However, I don't understand how this works, possibly because I'm thinking about it as about an if statement.

If I have a field in table user_role, for example, which contains names like "Manager", "Part Time" etc., how do I generate a field role_order with a different number depending on the role. In the case of this example, "if user_role = 'Manager' then role_order = 5".

Please note I am looking for a teach a man how to fish answer rather than give a man a fish answer.

108

CASE is more like a switch statement. It has two syntaxes you can use. The first lets you use any compare statements you want:

CASE 
    WHEN user_role = 'Manager' then 4
    WHEN user_name = 'Tom' then 27
    WHEN columnA <> columnB then 99
    ELSE -1 --unknown
END

The second style is for when you are only examining one value, and is a little more succinct:

CASE user_role
    WHEN 'Manager' then 4
    WHEN 'Part Time' then 7
    ELSE -1 --unknown
END
  • 1
    What you are saying makes sense, I am still confused about where it goes inside the rest of the query I tried SELECT *, your-code AS role_order FROM table But I keep getting errors. Can you show an example using a whole query? Thank you! – JD Isaacks Aug 2 '10 at 16:41
  • 7
    I figured it out, You are supposed to just end with "END" not "END CASE" dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/case-statement.html Thank you! – JD Isaacks Aug 2 '10 at 16:48
  • For those who did not read the linked docs above, you may not read this comment either, but in case you do: Note that there are two different forms of CASE, with very similar syntax, but somewhat different purpose/use... See also this question. – Air May 2 '14 at 0:40
  • 1
    @AirThomas: Actually, what he is describing is the CASE expression, according to MySQL documentation. Whereas the OP referenced the CASE statement. – Svip Jan 2 '15 at 16:17
  • 1
    @Svip Absolutely correct, I had them reversed. Good catch. (For the sake of keeping the comments clean, +1 this when you've read it and I will delete it as well.) – Air Jan 2 '15 at 16:25
13

CASE in MySQL is both a statement and an expression, where each usage is slightly different.

As a statement, CASE works much like a switch statement and is useful in stored procedures, as shown in this example from the documentation (linked above):

DELIMITER |

CREATE PROCEDURE p()
  BEGIN
    DECLARE v INT DEFAULT 1;

    CASE v
      WHEN 2 THEN SELECT v;
      WHEN 3 THEN SELECT 0;
      ELSE
        BEGIN -- Do other stuff
        END;
    END CASE;
  END;
  |

However, as an expression it can be used in clauses:

SELECT *
  FROM employees
  ORDER BY
    CASE title
      WHEN "President" THEN 1
      WHEN "Manager" THEN 2
      ELSE 3
    END, surname

Additionally, both as a statement and as an expression, the first argument can be omitted and each WHEN must take a condition.

SELECT *
  FROM employees
  ORDER BY
    CASE 
      WHEN title = "President" THEN 1
      WHEN title = "Manager" THEN 2
      ELSE 3
    END, surname

I provided this answer because the other answer fails to mention that CASE can function both as a statement and as an expression. The major difference between them is that the statement form ends with END CASE and the expression form ends with just END.

1

I wanted a simple example of the use of case that I could play with, this doesn't even need a table. This returns odd or even depending whether seconds is odd or even

SELECT CASE MOD(SECOND(NOW()),2) WHEN 0 THEN 'odd' WHEN 1 THEN 'even' END;

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.