1153

What is the most Pythonic way to pad a numeric string with zeroes to the left, i.e., so the numeric string has a specific length?

13 Answers 13

1882

Strings:

>>> n = '4'
>>> print(n.zfill(3))
004

And for numbers:

>>> n = 4
>>> print('%03d' % n)
004
>>> print(format(n, '03')) # python >= 2.6
004
>>> print('{0:03d}'.format(n))  # python >= 2.6
004
>>> print('{foo:03d}'.format(foo=n))  # python >= 2.6
004
>>> print('{:03d}'.format(n))  # python >= 2.7 + python3
004
>>> print('{0:03d}'.format(n))  # python 3
004
>>> print(f'{n:03}') # python >= 3.6
004

String formatting documentation.

  • 2
    Unknown format code 'd' for object of type 'float'. – Cees Timmerman Jun 24 '14 at 13:32
  • 4
    Comments python >= 2.6 are incorrect. That syntax doesn't work on python >= 3. You could change it to python < 3, but may I suggest instead always using parenthesis and omitting the comments altogether (encouraging recommended usage)? – Jason R. Coombs Sep 28 '15 at 13:13
  • 4
    Note that you don't need to number your format strings: '{:03d} {:03d}'.format(1, 2) implicitly assigns the values in order. – Dragon Jul 8 '16 at 11:32
  • 1
    @JasonR.Coombs: I assume you meant the print statement, when it should be a print function on Python 3? I edited in the parens; since only one thing is being printed, it works identically now on Py2 and Py3. – ShadowRanger Jan 25 at 2:19
  • 2
299

Just use the rjust method of the string object.

This example will make a string of 10 characters long, padding as necessary.

>>> t = 'test'
>>> t.rjust(10, '0')
>>> '000000test'
91

For numbers:

print "%05d" % number

See also: Python: String formatting.

EDIT: It's worth noting that as of yesterday December 3rd, 2008, this method of formatting is deprecated in favour of the format string method:

print("{0:05d}".format(number)) # or
print(format(number, "05d"))

See PEP 3101 for details.

  • 3
    PEP 3101 does not state that % is deprecated in any way. – zwirbeltier Nov 29 '14 at 16:20
  • @zwirbeltier PEP 3101 explains how to use format, is what I meant. – Konrad Rudolph Nov 29 '14 at 16:33
  • 4
    The "EDIT" still states "… this method of formatting is deprecated …". – zwirbeltier Nov 29 '14 at 16:38
  • 1
    @zwirbeltier Yes, and it is deprecated. But this isn't directly stated in the PEP. The documentation, however, says to use format instead, and people generally interpret this as intent to deprecate. – Konrad Rudolph Nov 29 '14 at 16:43
  • Docs: Backwards Compatibility - Backwards compatibility can be maintained by leaving the existing mechanisms in place. The new system does not collide with any of the method names of the existing string formatting techniques, so both systems can co-exist until it comes time to deprecate the older system. – JayRizzo Sep 1 '18 at 9:47
47
>>> '99'.zfill(5)
'00099'
>>> '99'.rjust(5,'0')
'00099'

if you want the opposite:

>>> '99'.ljust(5,'0')
'99000'
46

Works in both Python 2 and Python 3:

>>> "{:0>2}".format("1")  # Works for both numbers and strings.
'01'
>>> "{:02}".format(1)  # Only works for numbers.
'01'
34

str(n).zfill(width) will work with strings, ints, floats... and is Python 2.x and 3.x compatible:

>>> n = 3
>>> str(n).zfill(5)
'00003'
>>> n = '3'
>>> str(n).zfill(5)
'00003'
>>> n = '3.0'
>>> str(n).zfill(5)
'003.0'
16

For the ones who came here to understand and not just a quick answer. I do these especially for time strings:

hour = 4
minute = 3
"{:0>2}:{:0>2}".format(hour,minute)
# prints 04:03

"{:0>3}:{:0>5}".format(hour,minute)
# prints '004:00003'

"{:0<3}:{:0<5}".format(hour,minute)
# prints '400:30000'

"{:$<3}:{:#<5}".format(hour,minute)
# prints '4$$:3####'

"0" symbols what to replace with the "2" padding characters, the default is an empty space

">" symbols allign all the 2 "0" character to the left of the string

":" symbols the format_spec

15
width = 10
x = 5
print "%0*d" % (width, x)
> 0000000005

See the print documentation for all the exciting details!

Update for Python 3.x (7.5 years later)

That last line should now be:

print("%0*d" % (width, x))

I.e. print() is now a function, not a statement. Note that I still prefer the Old School printf() style because, IMNSHO, it reads better, and because, um, I've been using that notation since January, 1980. Something ... old dogs .. something something ... new tricks.

11

What is the most pythonic way to pad a numeric string with zeroes to the left, i.e., so the numeric string has a specific length?

str.zfill is specifically intended to do this:

>>> '1'.zfill(4)
'0001'

Note that it is specifically intended to handle numeric strings as requested, and moves a + or - to the beginning of the string:

>>> '+1'.zfill(4)
'+001'
>>> '-1'.zfill(4)
'-001'

Here's the help on str.zfill:

>>> help(str.zfill)
Help on method_descriptor:

zfill(...)
    S.zfill(width) -> str

    Pad a numeric string S with zeros on the left, to fill a field
    of the specified width. The string S is never truncated.

Performance

This is also the most performant of alternative methods:

>>> min(timeit.repeat(lambda: '1'.zfill(4)))
0.18824880896136165
>>> min(timeit.repeat(lambda: '1'.rjust(4, '0')))
0.2104538488201797
>>> min(timeit.repeat(lambda: f'{1:04}'))
0.32585487607866526
>>> min(timeit.repeat(lambda: '{:04}'.format(1)))
0.34988890308886766

To best compare apples to apples for the % method (note it is actually slower), which will otherwise pre-calculate:

>>> min(timeit.repeat(lambda: '1'.zfill(0 or 4)))
0.19728074967861176
>>> min(timeit.repeat(lambda: '%04d' % (0 or 1)))
0.2347015216946602

Implementation

With a little digging, I found the implementation of the zfill method in Objects/stringlib/transmogrify.h:

static PyObject *
stringlib_zfill(PyObject *self, PyObject *args)
{
    Py_ssize_t fill;
    PyObject *s;
    char *p;
    Py_ssize_t width;

    if (!PyArg_ParseTuple(args, "n:zfill", &width))
        return NULL;

    if (STRINGLIB_LEN(self) >= width) {
        return return_self(self);
    }

    fill = width - STRINGLIB_LEN(self);

    s = pad(self, fill, 0, '0');

    if (s == NULL)
        return NULL;

    p = STRINGLIB_STR(s);
    if (p[fill] == '+' || p[fill] == '-') {
        /* move sign to beginning of string */
        p[0] = p[fill];
        p[fill] = '0';
    }

    return s;
}

Let's walk through this C code.

It first parses the argument positionally, meaning it doesn't allow keyword arguments:

>>> '1'.zfill(width=4)
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: zfill() takes no keyword arguments

It then checks if it's the same length or longer, in which case it returns the string.

>>> '1'.zfill(0)
'1'

zfill calls pad (this pad function is also called by ljust, rjust, and center as well). This basically copies the contents into a new string and fills in the padding.

static inline PyObject *
pad(PyObject *self, Py_ssize_t left, Py_ssize_t right, char fill)
{
    PyObject *u;

    if (left < 0)
        left = 0;
    if (right < 0)
        right = 0;

    if (left == 0 && right == 0) {
        return return_self(self);
    }

    u = STRINGLIB_NEW(NULL, left + STRINGLIB_LEN(self) + right);
    if (u) {
        if (left)
            memset(STRINGLIB_STR(u), fill, left);
        memcpy(STRINGLIB_STR(u) + left,
               STRINGLIB_STR(self),
               STRINGLIB_LEN(self));
        if (right)
            memset(STRINGLIB_STR(u) + left + STRINGLIB_LEN(self),
                   fill, right);
    }

    return u;
}

After calling pad, zfill moves any originally preceding + or - to the beginning of the string.

Note that for the original string to actually be numeric is not required:

>>> '+foo'.zfill(10)
'+000000foo'
>>> '-foo'.zfill(10)
'-000000foo'
4
>>> width = 4
>>> x = 5
>>> print("%0*d" %(width,x))
>>> 00005

this will work in python 3.x

4

For zip codes saved as integers:

>>> a = 6340
>>> b = 90210
>>> print '%05d' % a
06340
>>> print '%05d' % b
90210
  • 5
    Not in Python 3.x it's not. – Johnsyweb Jun 1 '11 at 4:41
  • 1
    You are correct, and I like your suggestion with zfill better anyhow – user221014 Jun 11 '11 at 3:01
  • 2
    zip codes saved as integers is a fail! :) – Anentropic Aug 21 '14 at 8:52
2

Quick timing comparison:

setup = '''
from random import randint
def test_1():
    num = randint(0,1000000)
    return str(num).zfill(7)
def test_2():
    num = randint(0,1000000)
    return format(num, '07')
def test_3():
    num = randint(0,1000000)
    return '{0:07d}'.format(num)
def test_4():
    num = randint(0,1000000)
    return format(num, '07d')
def test_5():
    num = randint(0,1000000)
    return '{:07d}'.format(num)
def test_6():
    num = randint(0,1000000)
    return '{x:07d}'.format(x=num)
def test_7():
    num = randint(0,1000000)
    return str(num).rjust(7, '0')
'''
import timeit
print timeit.Timer("test_1()", setup=setup).repeat(3, 900000)
print timeit.Timer("test_2()", setup=setup).repeat(3, 900000)
print timeit.Timer("test_3()", setup=setup).repeat(3, 900000)
print timeit.Timer("test_4()", setup=setup).repeat(3, 900000)
print timeit.Timer("test_5()", setup=setup).repeat(3, 900000)
print timeit.Timer("test_6()", setup=setup).repeat(3, 900000)
print timeit.Timer("test_7()", setup=setup).repeat(3, 900000)


> [2.281613943830961, 2.2719342631547077, 2.261691106209631]
> [2.311480238815406, 2.318420542148333, 2.3552384305184493]
> [2.3824197456864304, 2.3457239951596485, 2.3353268829498646]
> [2.312442972404032, 2.318053102249902, 2.3054072168069872]
> [2.3482314132374853, 2.3403386400002475, 2.330108825844775]
> [2.424549090688892, 2.4346475296851438, 2.429691196530058]
> [2.3259756401716487, 2.333549212826732, 2.32049893822186]

I've made different tests of different repetitions. The differences are not huge, but in all tests, the zfill solution was fastest.

-2

You could also repeat "0", prepend it to str(n) and get the rightmost width slice. Quick and dirty little expression.

def pad_left(n, width, pad="0"):
    return ((pad * width) + str(n))[-width:]
  • This only works for positive numbers though. It gets a little more complicated if you want negatives too. But this expression is good for quick and dirty work, if you don't mind that kind of thing. – J Lacar May 6 '13 at 22:06

protected by Vamsi Prabhala Aug 30 '16 at 13:56

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