36

I have a very large dataset that is loaded in Hive. It consists of about 1.9 million rows and 1450 columns. I need to determine the "coverage" of each of the columns, meaning, the fraction of rows that have non-NaN values for each column.

Here is my code:

from pyspark import SparkContext
from pyspark.sql import HiveContext
import string as string

sc = SparkContext(appName="compute_coverages") ## Create the context
sqlContext = HiveContext(sc)

df = sqlContext.sql("select * from data_table")
nrows_tot = df.count()

covgs=sc.parallelize(df.columns)
        .map(lambda x: str(x))
        .map(lambda x: (x, float(df.select(x).dropna().count()) / float(nrows_tot) * 100.))

Trying this out in the pyspark shell, if I then do covgs.take(10), it returns a rather large error stack. It says that there's a problem in save in the file /usr/lib64/python2.6/pickle.py. This is the final part of the error:

py4j.protocol.Py4JError: An error occurred while calling o37.__getnewargs__. Trace:
py4j.Py4JException: Method __getnewargs__([]) does not exist
        at py4j.reflection.ReflectionEngine.getMethod(ReflectionEngine.java:333)
        at py4j.reflection.ReflectionEngine.getMethod(ReflectionEngine.java:342)
        at py4j.Gateway.invoke(Gateway.java:252)
        at py4j.commands.AbstractCommand.invokeMethod(AbstractCommand.java:133)
        at py4j.commands.CallCommand.execute(CallCommand.java:79)
        at py4j.GatewayConnection.run(GatewayConnection.java:207)
        at java.lang.Thread.run(Thread.java:745)

If there is a better way to accomplish this than the way I'm trying, I'm open to suggestions. I can't use pandas, though, as it's not currently available on the cluster I work on and I don't have rights to install it.

84

Let's start with a dummy data:

from pyspark.sql import Row

row = Row("v", "x", "y", "z")
df = sc.parallelize([
    row(0.0, 1, 2, 3.0), row(None, 3, 4, 5.0),
    row(None, None, 6, 7.0), row(float("Nan"), 8, 9, float("NaN"))
]).toDF()

## +----+----+---+---+
## |   v|   x|  y|  z|
## +----+----+---+---+
## | 0.0|   1|  2|3.0|
## |null|   3|  4|5.0|
## |null|null|  6|7.0|
## | NaN|   8|  9|NaN|
## +----+----+---+---+

All you need is a simple aggregation:

from pyspark.sql.functions import col, count, isnan, lit, sum

def count_not_null(c, nan_as_null=False):
    """Use conversion between boolean and integer
    - False -> 0
    - True ->  1
    """
    pred = col(c).isNotNull() & (~isnan(c) if nan_as_null else lit(True))
    return sum(pred.cast("integer")).alias(c)

df.agg(*[count_not_null(c) for c in df.columns]).show()

## +---+---+---+---+
## |  v|  x|  y|  z|
## +---+---+---+---+
## |  2|  3|  4|  4|
## +---+---+---+---+

or if you want to treat NaN a NULL:

df.agg(*[count_not_null(c, True) for c in df.columns]).show()

## +---+---+---+---+
## |  v|  x|  y|  z|
## +---+---+---+---+
## |  1|  3|  4|  3|
## +---+---+---+---

You can also leverage SQL NULL semantics to achieve the same result without creating a custom function:

df.agg(*[
    count(c).alias(c)    # vertical (column-wise) operations in SQL ignore NULLs
    for c in df.columns
]).show()

## +---+---+---+
## |  x|  y|  z|
## +---+---+---+
## |  1|  2|  3|
## +---+---+---+

but this won't work with NaNs.

If you prefer fractions:

exprs = [(count_not_null(c) / count("*")).alias(c) for c in df.columns]
df.agg(*exprs).show()

## +------------------+------------------+---+
## |                 x|                 y|  z|
## +------------------+------------------+---+
## |0.3333333333333333|0.6666666666666666|1.0|
## +------------------+------------------+---+

or

# COUNT(*) is equivalent to COUNT(1) so NULLs won't be an issue
df.select(*[(count(c) / count("*")).alias(c) for c in df.columns]).show()

## +------------------+------------------+---+
## |                 x|                 y|  z|
## +------------------+------------------+---+
## |0.3333333333333333|0.6666666666666666|1.0|
## +------------------+------------------+---+

Scala equivalent:

import org.apache.spark.sql.Column
import org.apache.spark.sql.functions.{col, isnan, sum}

type JDouble = java.lang.Double

val df = Seq[(JDouble, JDouble, JDouble, JDouble)](
  (0.0, 1, 2, 3.0), (null, 3, 4, 5.0),
  (null, null, 6, 7.0), (java.lang.Double.NaN, 8, 9, java.lang.Double.NaN)
).toDF()


def count_not_null(c: Column, nanAsNull: Boolean = false) = {
  val pred = c.isNotNull and (if (nanAsNull) not(isnan(c)) else lit(true))
  sum(pred.cast("integer"))
}

df.select(df.columns map (c => count_not_null(col(c)).alias(c)): _*).show
// +---+---+---+---+                                                               
// | _1| _2| _3| _4|
// +---+---+---+---+
// |  2|  3|  4|  4|
// +---+---+---+---+

 df.select(df.columns map (c => count_not_null(col(c), true).alias(c)): _*).show
 // +---+---+---+---+
 // | _1| _2| _3| _4|
 // +---+---+---+---+
 // |  1|  3|  4|  3|
 // +---+---+---+---+
| improve this answer | |
  • return sum(col(c).isNotNull().cast("integer")).alias(c) here does it automatically know which dataframe to access? Is it because we get the column names from that particular dataframe? – Roshini Sep 17 '16 at 16:50
  • @Roshini Columns are meaningful only in a scope of specific SQL expression which defines bindings. In other word context of a given select defines how columns are resolved. – zero323 Sep 17 '16 at 17:03
  • How to select the columns if the nan count is larger the a threshold number? – rosefun Jul 14 at 1:59
-1

You can use isNotNull() :

df.where(df[YOUR_COLUMN].isNotNull()).select(YOUR_COLUMN).show()
| improve this answer | |
  • Why the downvotes? This is pretty elegant and at least as pythonic as the above spark sql code (which is also excellent, but in many more simple contexts this code does just fine). Take an upvote. Upvotes for all! – eric Dec 30 '19 at 18:57
  • Nulls and nans have different functions – Tanner Clark Feb 29 at 19:10

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