10

I use a enum to define several variations which can be added to a product (custom logo, colors, etc.). Each variation has several options (ID, description in two languages, where in the process the changes are made, price, etc.). It has methods to define the variation further (for example which color should be used) or to override certain options. One product can either have zero, one or more variations stored in an ArrayList. Also a certain variation can be applied to one product more than once.

As long as I use a variation only once everything is fine. But in case I use it more than once it appears that all get the same options.

Sample code:

TestClass.java:

import java.util.ArrayList;

public class TestClass {
public static void main(String[] args) {
    ArrayList<TestEnum> enums = new ArrayList<>();
    TestEnum enumVar;

    enumVar = TestEnum.TEST1;
    enums.add(enumVar);
    enumVar = null;

    enumVar = TestEnum.TEST2;
    enums.add(enumVar);
    enumVar = null;

    enumVar = TestEnum.TEST2;
    enumVar.setOp1("new op21");
    enumVar.setOp2("new op22");
    enumVar.setOp3("new op23");
    enums.add(enumVar);
    enumVar = null;

    enums.forEach((element) -> {
        System.out.println("op1: " + element.getOp1() + "; op2: " + element.getOp2() + "; op3: " + element.getOp3());
        /*
        Expecting:
        op1: op11; op2: op12; op3: op13
        op1: op21; op2: op22; op3: op23
        op1: new op21; op2: new op22; op3: new op23

        Output:
        op1: op11; op2: op12; op3: op13
        op1: new op21; op2: new op22; op3: new op23
        op1: new op21; op2: new op22; op3: new op23
        */
    });
}
}

TestEnum.java:

public enum TestEnum {
TEST1("op11", "op12", "op13"),
TEST2("op21", "op22", "op23"),
TEST3("op31", "op32", "op33"),
TEST4("op41", "op42", "op43"),
TEST5("op51", "op52", "op53");

private String op1;
private String op2;
private String op3;

TestEnum(String op1, String op2, String op3) {
    this.op1 = op1;
    this.op2 = op2;
    this.op3 = op3;
}

public void setOp1(String op1) {
    this.op1 = op1;
}

public String getOp1() {
    return this.op1;
}

public void setOp2(String op2) {
    this.op2 = op2;
}

public String getOp2() {
    return this.op2;
}

public void setOp3(String op3) {
    this.op3 = op3;
}

public String getOp3() {
    return this.op3;
}
}

Is it possible to do what I have in mind with an enum?

If yes, what do I do wrong? Maybe there is any possibility to create a copy of an enum in a certain state?

2

5 Answers 5

9

No, enums are not a good fit for describing objects which are similar but have different states.

Enum constants are static. You don't have two different instances of TEST1. You have just one. Both of the list entries that refer to TEST2 in your example, refer to the same instance. It's not a copy, it's a second reference.

To have instances that are similar but have slightly different states, you should declare a class, not an enum. You could use an enum to describe the type of variation (e.g. COLOR_VARIATION, CUSTOM_LOGO). You could have two different classes that extend a class called Variation or use it directly - depends if the implementation details are different. But you will be using new Variation(...) or using a static factory method to create a new instance of Variation, and then, each Variation instance can have a different set of values in its fields, even if they are both of the same "variation type".

9

No, you can't do that with enums. There is always exactly one instance of each enum value. If you change the data on the enum (e.g. with one of your setOpn() methods) it is changed globally, because there is only one.

It's best to make the data on an enum immutable. Then, for the variable options, you can associate an ArrayList with each thing that has options, and assign it one of the enums.

You could do it like this:

public class ThingWithOptionsAndEnum {
    private final TestEnum myBaseOptions;
    private final ArrayList<String> myAdditionalOptions = new ArrayList<>();

    public ThingWithOptionsAndEnum(final TestEnum base, String... options) {
        this.myBaseOptions = base;
        if (options != null) {
            for (String option : options) {
                myAdditionalOptions.add(option);
            }
        }
    }
}
8

The other answers on this page are likely all correct, but might not really help you solve your problem.

Instead of an enum, try implementing a plain old class, but include a clone() method. Then, you can create a few "default" instances of the class that each represent a default product configuration. When a user selects a certain product configuration, you call clone() on the master object, then you can just use regular setters to modify the object from here.

Check out the Prototype design pattern. The whole idea is to use these "master" objects to create new copies that can then be changed. I think this might be is a little more what you're looking for. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prototype_pattern

2
  • 2
    This is a good creative answer. It addresses the OP's need without being bound by their assumptions. Nov 24, 2015 at 21:07
  • 3
    Don't use clone and Cloneable. Don't recommend using clone and Cloneable. The mechanism is broken, was thoroughly beaten about by Josh Bloch. One can always create a copy constructor, or add a few static factory methods that create "pre-assembled" instances. Nov 25, 2015 at 6:50
2

There is only one instance of each enum value. Think of them as global variables enforced by the compiler.

enumVar = TestEnum.TEST2;
enums.add(enumVar);
enumVar = null;

enumVar = TestEnum.TEST2;
enumVar.setOp1("new op21");
enumVar.setOp2("new op22");
enumVar.setOp3("new op23");
enums.add(enumVar);
enumVar = null;

Firstly, explicitly nulling the enumVar reference does nothing. Secondly, when you reference TestEnum.TEST2, you are pointing to the same value in both blocks -- meaning your later calls to setOp are overwriting the previous values.

1

Normally, an enum is invariant by definition. By adding setters to your enum, you make it variant.

As for your question, it's because you have the same reference to TEST2 in your array. Since it's a reference, the second and the third element is exacly the same. So if you modify any of the TEST2 element, the other reference reflect the change.

As to test this, you can switch the assignation lines (enumVar.setOp1) from the third to the second element and you will see the same behavior.

It's like you're transformed the enum to an object.

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