27

Let's assume I've got a Person class instance named person with first and last name properties which are both optional strings.

Now I want to construct a fullName string that contains either just their first or last name (if that's all that is available), or if we have both, their first and last name with a space in the middle.

var fullName : String?
if let first = person.first {
    name = first
}
if let last = person.last {
    if name == nil {
        name = last
    } else {
        name! += " " + last
    }
}

or

var name = ""
if let first = person.first {
    name = first
}
if let last = person.last {
    name = name.characters.count > 0 ? name + " " + last : last
}

Are we just supposed to nest if let's? Nil coalescing seems appropriate but I can't think of how to apply it in this scenario. I can't help but feeling like I'm doing optional string concatenation in an overly complicated way.

1
  • 4
    I disagree with @matt here - personally, I think that an empty string is probably a bad representation of no name. What you want the value to represent is "no name", not "a name of """.
    – oisdk
    Nov 24 '15 at 23:36

11 Answers 11

100

compactMap would work well here, combined with .joined(separator:):

let f: String? = "jo"
let l: String? = "smith"

[f,l] // "jo smith"
  .compactMap { $0 }
  .joined(separator: " ")

It doesn't put the space between if one is nil:

let n: String? = nil

[f,n] // "jo"
  .compactMap { $0 }
  .joined(separator: " ")
3
  • 3
    And it gives an empty string if both are nil, which is at least sane. Very nice!
    – matt
    Nov 24 '15 at 23:34
  • 1
    this is the answer i was looking for; thanks! by the way, flatMap is deprecated, use compactMap instead Jun 29 '18 at 11:04
  • beautiful pattern
    – Stan
    Sep 17 '20 at 22:20
6

Sometimes simple is best:

let first = p.first ?? ""
let last = p.last ?? ""
let both = !first.isEmpty && !last.isEmpty
let full = first + (both ? " " : "") + last

This works if there is no first or last, if there is a first but no last, if there is a last but no first, and if there are both a first and a last. I can't think of any other cases.

Here's an idiomatic incorporation of that idea into a calculated variable; as an extra benefit, I've allowed full to be nil just in case both the other names are nil:

struct Person {
    var first : String?
    var last : String?
    var full : String? {
        if first == nil && last == nil { return nil }
        let fi = p.first ?? ""
        let la = p.last ?? ""
        let both = !fi.isEmpty && !la.isEmpty
        return fi + (both ? " " : "") + la
    }
}
1
  • I like the usage of the nil coalescing operator here. Thank you for the concise example. Nov 24 '15 at 23:27
5

Somewhere, I believe in the swift book, I ran into this pattern, from when before you could have multiple lets in a single if:

class User {
    var lastName : String?
    var firstName : String?

    var fullName : String {
        switch (firstName, lastName) {
        case (.Some, .Some):
            return firstName! + " " + lastName!

        case (.None, .Some):
            return lastName!

        case (.Some, .None):
            return firstName!

        default:
            return ""
        }
    }

    init(lastName:String?, firstName:String?) {
        self.lastName = lastName
        self.firstName = firstName
    }
}

User(lastName: nil, firstName: "first").fullName        // -> "first"
User(lastName: "last", firstName: nil).fullName         // -> "last"
User(lastName: nil, firstName: nil).fullName            // -> ""
User(lastName: "last", firstName: "first").fullName     // -> "first last"

An even briefer solution, given swift 3.0:

var fullName : String {
    return [ firstName, lastName ].flatMap({$0}).joined(separator:" ")
}
2

Here is an alternative method:

let name = 
(person.first != nil && person.last != nil) ? 
person.first! + " " + person.last! : 
person.first ?? person.last!
1
  • 1
    Succinct solution, however, I believe the last part needs to be unwrapped like person.last!. Nov 24 '15 at 23:44
1

I like oisdk's approach but I didn't like the empty string if both were nil. I would rather have nil.

func add(a a: String?, b: String?, separator: String = " ") -> String? {
    let results = [a, b].flatMap {$0}
    guard results.count > 0 else { return nil }
    return results.joinWithSeparator(separator)
}
1
  • It should be pointed out that rather than having two strings as your arguments, you could leave it as an array of optional strings, allowing you to concatenate an arbitrary number of optional strings.
    – tebs1200
    Aug 4 '16 at 11:24
1

What oisdk answered was great, but I needed something very specific along the lines of the OP's original question.

Writing for Swift 4.x, I created this extension which works well when populating other strings, such as text labels. I have also updated it to include a function for handling an array if needed.

extension String {
    static func combine(first: String?, second: String?) -> String {
        return [first, second].compactMap{ $0 }.joined(separator: " ")
    }

    static func combine(strings: [String?]) -> String {
        return strings.compactMap { $0 }.joined(separator: " ")
    }
}

An example of this populating a text label with two optional strings:

print(String.combine(first: "First", second: "Last")) // "First Last"
print(String.combine(first: "First", second: nil)) // "First"
print(String.combine(first: nil, second: "Last")) // "Last"

If you have an array of optional strings, you can call the array function:

print(String.combine(strings: ["I", "Have", nil, "A", "String", nil, "Here"])) 
// "I Have A String Here"
2
  • Flawless way to add two optional strings. +1
    – Codetard
    Oct 1 '18 at 10:40
  • Thanks @SatnamSync, I updated the question for Swift 4.x & added the ability to also process arrays as well.
    – CodeBender
    Oct 1 '18 at 16:05
0
func getSingleValue(_ value: String?..., seperator: String = " ") -> String? {

    return value.reduce("") {
    ($0) + seperator + ($1 ?? "")
    }.trimmingCharacters(in: CharacterSet(charactersIn: seperator) )
}
0

for swift 4

let name: String? = "Foo"
let surname: String? = "Bar"

let fullname = (name ?? "") + " " + (surname ?? "")

print(fullname)
// Foo Bar
2
  • Beside the code, you should also provide a description of the solution you're proposing.
    – il_raffa
    May 8 '18 at 8:20
  • and? In some cases you get extra space symbol Jun 12 '19 at 15:36
0

It's too bad that there isn't more support for operators on the Optional enum, but I overloaded the standard concatenation operator (+) like this:

func +<T: StringProtocol>(lhs: Optional<T>, rhs: Optional<T>) -> String {
    return [lhs, rhs].compactMap({ $0 }).joined()
}

Then you can use it like this:

let first: String? = "first"
let last: String? = nil

first + first // "firstfirst"
first + last // "first"
last + first // "first"
last + last // ""
0

Add-On:

Consider you have Struct:

struct Person {
   var firstName: String?
   var lastName: String?
}

you can use the CustomStringConvertible

extension Person: CustomStringConvertible {

var description: String {
        [firstName, lastName].compactMap { $0 }.joined(separator: " ")
    }
}

 let person1 = Person(firstName "Jeba", lastName: "Moses")
 print(person1) // Prints "Jeba Moses"

let person2 = Person(firstName: "Ebenrick", lastName: nil)
print(person2) // Prints "Ebenrick"

         
0

For those who are want to check nil and "" value as well you can do something like this:

var a: String? = nil
let b = "first value"
let c: String? = nil
let d = ""
let e = "second value"
var result = [a,b,c,d,e].compactMap{ $0 }.filter { $0 != "" }.joined(separator:", ")
print(result)
//first value, second value

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