7

Example: Let's say I have these three classes. Foo is a proper Entity Framework entity with a DbSet whereas I want my EF DbContext to be unaware of Bar and Baz because I have flagged Foo's Bar property with my made up SerializedColumn attribute. By applying that attribute, I want EF to serialize the instance of Bar with its Bazes into a single string field, and transparently deserialize Bar to a Bar object when a Foo is materialized by EF.

public class Foo
{
    public Guid Id { get; set; }
    [SerializedColumn]
    public Bar Bar { get; set; }
    // ..
}

public class Bar
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public Baz[] Baz { get; set; }
    // ..
}

public class Baz
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    // ..
}

So Foo's table columns would look like:

[Id] [uniqueidentifier] NOT NULL
[Bar] [nvarchar](max) NULL

And when I query a Foo I get back one with the Bar property already deserialized. When I insert or update a Foo the Bar property gets serialized by EF without me having to think about it. The only thing I have to do is add the [SerializeColumn] attribute to properties.

Goals:

  • I'm not necessarily looking for a full blown solution (although I would accept it) but for guidance on where to jump into EF's pipeline, and how to do that. I.E. what EF classes, configurations, conventions, etc. do I need to take into account?
  • I want Migrations to be generated as one would expect. Which is to say, I wouldn't want my Bar property to turn into a "Bar_Id" field that points to a "Bar" table. Instead I want a nvarchar(max) "Bar" field that will contain the serialized version of a Bar object. If this simply isn't possible, please say so in your answer.

Notes:

  • The idea for this came after watching the Building Applications with Entity Framework 6 video by Rowan Miller.
  • ComplexType does not serve my needs. I need deep serialization and do not need to be able to filter or sort on any properties of what has been serialized.
  • I plan on serializing with Newtonsoft's JSON library, but how serialization happens doesn't really matter.
3
  • Something like this? stackoverflow.com/questions/14779740/… – MutantNinjaCodeMonkey Nov 24 '15 at 23:24
  • @MutantNinjaCodeMonkey I've done that in the past and it works, but am looking to make persistence totally transparent. That is only one property Bar with my made up SerializeColumnAttribute, and no BarSerialized property. – Jeremy Cook Nov 24 '15 at 23:30
  • 2
    Pretty sure this is not possible in EF6. What you really need is a customer type converter. That feature is planned for EF7 but not yet implemented. – DavidG Dec 2 '15 at 1:36
10

The only solution is this,

public class Foo
{
    public Guid Id { get; set; }

    // Not Mapped attribute will make EF
    // ignore this property completely
    [NotMapped]
    public Bar BarObject { 
      get;
      set;
    }

    public string Bar{
       get{
          return JsonConvert.Serialize(BarObject);
       }
       set{
          BarObject = JsonConvert.Deserialize<BarObject>(value);
       }
    }
}

Updated as per suggestion by @zds

2
  • Thank you Akash but I gave the bounty to @bubi since he answered first with essentially the same answer as you, albeit a little less detailed. If I could, I would have split the bounty between both answers. – Jeremy Cook Dec 8 '15 at 21:23
  • 1
    Could it be better to move serialization logic to 'public string Bar' property. Not to serialize and deserialize all the time, when changing something. Or am I missing something? – zds Aug 3 '16 at 15:52
1
+250

No way to do it without modifing EF. With EF 6 I think that several people did it with a text backing field and some limitations (Bar and Bar children does not access to EF persisted property or you need other work after deserialization).

3
  • I'd be just fine with the limitations that come with a text backing field in the database (no filtering, in-database projections, etc.). Or by text backing field are you referring to using two properties, one marked [NotMapped] that is the in-memory, decrypted version of the encrypted property that EF will persist? – Jeremy Cook Dec 3 '15 at 18:25
  • For backing field I mean two properties, one marked [NotMapped] that is the in-memory, decrypted version of the encrypted property that EF will persist. – bubi Dec 3 '15 at 19:03
  • Well, nothing wrong with backing properties if that's what it comes to. Thanks @bubi I'm going to let this bounty linger for a bit longer to see if anyone else can add some helpful information. – Jeremy Cook Dec 3 '15 at 20:05

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