From this post:

Two threads being timesliced on a single CPU core won't run into a reordering problem. A single core always knows about its own reordering and will properly resolve all its own memory accesses. Multiple cores however operate independently in this regard and thus won't really know about each other's reordering.

Why can't the instruction reorder issue occur on a single CPU core? This article doesn't explain it.

EXAMPLE:
The following pictures are picked from Memory Reordering Caught in the Act:
enter image description here

Below is recorded:

enter image description here

I think the recorded instructions can also cause issue on a single CPU, because both r1 and r2 aren't 1.

up vote 2 down vote accepted

A single core always knows about its own reordering and will properly resolve all its own memory accesses.

A single CPU core does reorder, but it knows it's own reordering, and can do clever tricks to pretend it's not. Thus, things go faster, without weird side effects.

Multiple cores however operate independently in this regard and thus won't really know about each other's reordering.

When a CPU reorders, the other CPUs can't compensate for this. Imagine if CPU #1 is waiting for a write to variableA, then it reads from variableB. If CPU#2 wrotes to variableB, then variableA like the code says, no problems occur. If CPU#2 reorders to write to variableA first, then CPU#1 doesn't know and tries to read from variableB before it has a value. This can cause crashes or any "random" behavior. (Intel chips have more magic that makes this not happen)

Two threads being timesliced on a single CPU core won't run into a reordering problem.

If both threads are on the same CPU, then it doesn't matter which order the writes happen in, because if they're reordered, then they're both in progress, and the CPU won't really switch until both are written, in which case they're safe to read from the other thread.

Example

For the code to have a problem on a single core, it would have to rearrange the two instructions from process 1 and be interrupted by process 2 and execute that between the two instructions. But if interrupted between them, it knows it has to abort both of them since it knows about it's own reordering, and knows it's in a dangerous state. So it will either do them in order, or do both before switching to process 2, or do neither before switching to process 2. All of which avoid the reordering problem.

  • For "Two threads being timesliced on a single CPU core won't run into a reordering problem.", I have added "EDIT" part in the OP. Could you help to explain it? Thanks in advance! – Nan Xiao Nov 25 '15 at 7:27

There are multiple effects at work, but they are modeled as just one effect. Makes it easier to reason about them. Yes, a modern core already re-orders instructions by itself. But it maintains logical flow between them, if two instructions have an inter-dependency between them then they stay ordered so the logic of the program does not change. Discovering these inter-dependencies and preventing an instruction from being issued too early is the job of the reorder buffer in the execution engine.

This logic is solid and can be relied upon, it would be next to impossible to write a program if that wasn't the case. But that same guarantee cannot be provided by the memory controller. It has the un-enviable job of giving multiple processors access to the same shared memory.

First is the prefetcher, it reads data from memory ahead of time to ensure the data is available by the time a read instruction executes. Ensures the core won't stall waiting for the read to complete. With the problem that, because memory was read early, it might be a stale value that was changed by another core between the time the prefetch was done and the read instruction executes. To an outside observer it looks like the instruction executed early.

And the store buffer, it takes the data of a write instruction and writes it lazily to memory. Later, after the instruction executed. Ensures the core won't stall waiting on the memory bus write cycle to complete. To an outside observer, it just looks like the instruction executed late.

Modeling the effects of the prefetcher and store buffer as instruction reordering effects is very convenient. You can write that down on a piece of paper easily and reason about the side-effects.

To the core itself, the effects of the prefetcher and store buffer are entirely benign and it is oblivious to them. As long as there isn't another core that's also changing memory content. A machine with a single core always has that guarantee.

  • So the EDIT part in OP won't occur on one-core CPU machine? – Nan Xiao Nov 25 '15 at 9:17
  • You have to erase the right column. Now Processor 1 doesn't care anymore that the write occurs before or after the read. It would only ever care if X and Y are the same memory location. The reorder buffer already takes care of that. – Hans Passant Nov 25 '15 at 9:27
  • Sorry, could you elaborate it? – Nan Xiao Nov 25 '15 at 9:34
  • @HansPassant This was very helpful indeed. I just had a follow up question - so when we say reordering, it's not actually re-ordering the instruction by the processor, just appears reordering to an outside observers ? Like as you said - the read instruction did not get prioritised over a latter instruction, just that the pre-fetcher fetched it earlier ? – ustulation Mar 1 '17 at 20:45

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