71
root@server:~# docker images -a        
REPOSITORY              TAG                 IMAGE ID            CREATED             VIRTUAL SIZE
<none>                  <none>              5e2dfc857e73        5 days ago          261.6 MB
<none>                  <none>              d053e988f23d        5 days ago          261.6 MB
<none>                  <none>              1d5d4a2d89eb        5 days ago          261.6 MB
<none>                  <none>              ea0d189fdb19        5 days ago          100.5 MB
<none>                  <none>              26c6175962b3        5 days ago          100.5 MB
<none>                  <none>              73d5cec4a0b3        5 days ago          100.5 MB
<none>                  <none>              e19590e1bac1        5 days ago          100.5 MB

I've tried the following:

docker rmi $(docker images | grep "^<none>" | awk "{print $3}")

And the following:

docker rmi $(docker images -f "dangling=true" -q)

Get the following error:

docker: "rmi" requires a minimum of 1 argument.
See 'docker rmi --help'.

Usage:  docker rmi [OPTIONS] IMAGE [IMAGE...]

Remove one or more images
  • It's a bit late but I have to add this comment for other users. If you use Windows Command Prompt, this won't work. Because Command Prompt doesn't support inner functions. Try the exact lines with Windows PowerShell – er-han Jun 19 '17 at 6:47
  • docker rmi $(docker images -a | grep "^<none>" | awk '{print $3}') – Ondra Žižka Mar 8 '18 at 0:54
  • docker rmi $(docker images | grep "<none>" | awk "{print $3}") – David Jan 2 at 23:12
  • docker rmi $(docker images -f dangling=true -q) – Jinna Balu Jan 8 at 6:29

19 Answers 19

98

You can try and list only untagged images (ones with no labels, or with label with no tag):

docker images -q -a | xargs docker inspect --format='{{.Id}}{{range $rt := .RepoTags}} {{$rt}} {{end}}'|grep -v ':'

However, some of those untagged images might be needed by others.

I prefer removing only dangling images:

docker rmi $(docker images --filter "dangling=true" -q --no-trunc)

As I mentioned for for docker 1.13+ in Sept. 2016 in "How to remove old and unused Docker images", you can also do the image prune command:

docker image prune

That being said, Janaka Bandara mentions in the comments:

This did not remove <none>-tagged images for me (e.g. foo/bar:<none>); I had to use docker images --digests and docker rmi foo/bar@<digest>

Janaka references "How to Remove a Signed Image with a Tag" from Paul V. Novarese:

# docker images
REPOSITORY               TAG                 IMAGE ID            CREATED             SIZE
pvnovarese/mprime        latest              459769dbc7a1        5 days ago          4.461 MB
pvnovarese/mprime        <none>              459769dbc7a1        5 days ago          4.461 MB

Diagnostic Steps

You can see the difference in these two entries if you use the --digests=true option (the untagged entry has the Docker Content Trust signature digest):

# docker images --digests=true
REPOSITORY               TAG                 DIGEST                                                                    IMAGE ID            CREATED             SIZE
pvnovarese/mprime        latest              <none>                                                                    459769dbc7a1        5 days ago          4.461 MB
pvnovarese/mprime        <none>              sha256:0b315a681a6b9f14f93ab34f3c744fd547bda30a03b55263d93861671fa33b00   459769dbc7a1        5 days ago     

Note that Paul also mentions moby issue 18892:

After pulling a signed image, there is an "extra" entry (with tag <none>) in "docker images" output.
This makes it difficult to rmi the image (you have to force it, or else first delete the properly-tagged entry, or delete by digest.

  • 1
    This did not remove <none>-tagged images for me (e.g. foo/bar:<none>); I had to use docker images --digests and docker rmi foo/bar@<digest> as described at success.docker.com/KBase/… – Janaka Bandara Aug 12 '17 at 5:02
  • 1
    @JanakaBandara Thank you. I have included your comment in the answer (with some additional links) – VonC Aug 12 '17 at 5:39
  • for me sudo docker rmi $(docker images --filter "dangling=true" -q --no-trunc) Got permission denied while trying to connect to the Docker daemon socket at unix:///var/run/docker.sock: Get http://%2Fvar%2Frun%2Fdocker.sock/v1.35/images/json?filters=%7B%22dangling%22%3A%7B%22true%22%3Atrue%7D%7D: dial unix /var/run/docker.sock: connect: permission denied "docker rmi" requires at least 1 argument. See 'docker rmi --help'. Usage: docker rmi [OPTIONS] IMAGE [IMAGE...] [flags] Remove one or more images – Jamie Hutber Feb 7 '18 at 14:39
  • @JamieHutber "docker rmi" requires at least 1 argument. That suggests docker images --filter "dangling=true" -q --no-trunc returns nothing, meaning there is no dangling images? – VonC Feb 7 '18 at 14:42
  • Thanks VonC actually it doesn't hutber@hutber-blade /var/www/dockerfile-wizard $ sudo docker images --filter "dangling=true" -q --no-trunc sha256:c58f4e4b10b1f862d78f96e90bdf13ffe37993279d0992be46d5c15dad51421e sha256:db28e821bc3f337caf711a664bc529be5db8894dd73c5b013ad814cc1e9fc21b sha256:257936750a7d43ae77c713c2cb18342be935de7d3b8fad23d6664fc64acfe753 sha256:6b815cefeb527885b2b9dd831f7f40b05942f00d1367274833a6274154d8ce43 – Jamie Hutber Feb 7 '18 at 15:58
17
docker images | grep none | awk '{ print $3; }' | xargs docker rmi

You can try this simply

  • Quickest and easiest solution for me – Mark May 16 at 10:19
10

docker image prune removes all dangling images (those with tag none). docker image prune -a would also remove any images that have no container that uses them.

The difference between dangling and unused images is explained in this stackoverflow thread.

3

According to the docker documentation you can list only untagged (dangling) images with

$ docker images -f "dangling=true"

and redirect them to docker rmi command like that:

$ docker rmi $(docker images -f "dangling=true" -q) --force

Notice -q param thats only show numeric IDs of containers.

  • 1
    Isn't it similar to what I proposed in my answer in 2015? – VonC Jan 9 at 12:13
2

I have found docker image prune -f most useful and I use it all the time during my day to day work, using the tag -f will not prompt for confirmation. More details here

2

You can go docker rmi $(docker images -f "dangling=true" -q). See the images documentation for more options.

$ docker images
REPOSITORY                  TAG                 IMAGE ID            CREATED             SIZE
<none>                      <none>              94870cda569b        4 seconds ago       673MB
python                      2.7                 320a06f42b5f        10 days ago         673MB
mysql                       latest              e799c7f9ae9c        2 months ago        407MB
gcavalcante8808/semaphore   latest              86e863e11461        2 months ago        537MB
redis                       latest              e32ef7250bc1        2 months ago        184MB
rabbitmq                    3.6.9-management    7e69e14cc496        2 months ago        179MB
rabbitmq                    3.6.9               eb2e4968538a        2 months ago        179MB
jordan/rundeck              latest              6d40b57b1572        2 months ago        660MB
rabbitmq                    3.5.6-management    dbfe8d18809a        19 months ago       304MB

$ docker rmi $(docker images --format '{{.ID}}' --filter=dangling=true)
Deleted: sha256:94870cda569b8cf5f42be25af107d464c993b4502a1472c1679bf2d213b6c0a6
2

You may check if the filter 'dangling' is no more working

$ docker images -f “dangling=true” -q
Error response from daemon: Invalid filter 'dangling'

Use docker system prune to remove the dangling images

$ docker system prune
WARNING! This will remove:
        - all stopped containers
        - all networks not used by at least one container
        - all dangling images
        - all dangling build cache
Are you sure you want to continue? [y/N]

You may use --force for not prompt for confirmation

$ docker system prune --force
1

Remove images which have none as the repository name using the following:

docker rmi $(docker images | grep "^<none" | awk '{print $3}')

Remove images which have none tag or repository name:

docker rmi $(docker images | grep "none" | awk '{print $3}')
1

To remove dangling images please use :

docker image rm $(docker images --format "{{.ID}}" --filter "dangling=true")

Please refer to my answer here for a more detailed description : https://unix.stackexchange.com/a/445664/292327

1

The below command is working for me. this is just simple grep "" images and get the docker image id and removed all the images. Simple single command as it has to.

docker rmi $(docker images |grep "<none>"| awk '{print $3}')

1

docker system prune will do the trick, it removes

- all stopped containers
- all networks not used by at least one container
- all dangling images
- all dangling build cache

But use it, with the caution!

0

Its simple and clear,

Even I took 3 days to understand this simple and crisp error.

The docker image is not built successfully

Step 7/13 : COPY jupyter_notebook_config.py /root/.jupyter/
 ---> bf29ce6fe6dc
Step 8/13 : COPY notebooks /notebooks
COPY failed: stat /var/lib/docker/tmp/docker-builder776981166/notebooks: no such file or directory
anarchist@anarchist-desktop:~/Documents/sam/dockerDem$ docker images
REPOSITORY          TAG                 IMAGE ID            CREATED             SIZE
<none>              <none>              bf29ce6fe6dc        9 seconds ago       1.27GB
ubuntu              16.04               a51debf7e1eb        3 weeks ago         116MB

Then I removed the 8th line from Dockerfile, it was signal success this time.

Successfully built b6724370f8ca
Successfully tagged dem:expo
anarchist@anarchist-desktop:~/Documents/sam/dockerDem$ docker run -it -p 8888:8888 dem:expo
[I 06:11:38.984 NotebookApp] Writing notebook server cookie secret to /root/.local/share/jupyter/runtime/notebook_cookie_secret
[I 06:11:39.011 NotebookApp] Serving notebooks from local directory: /
[I 06:11:39.011 NotebookApp] The Jupyter Notebook is running at:
[I 06:11:39.011 NotebookApp] http://(296d81166725 or 127.0.0.1):8888/?token=496feb282ef749c05277ef57a51e8a56fedb1c6b337b9f92

It says successfully tagged dem:expo, this line is imp during docker process.

0

This is an extension of tansadio's answer:

If you are getting following error:

Error response from daemon: conflict: unable to delete <> (must be forced) - image is being used by stopped container <>

You can force it with --force:

docker images | grep none | awk '{ print $3; }' | xargs docker rmi --force
0

docker rmi -f $(docker images -a|awk 'NR > 1 && $2 == "" {print $3}')

0

Following will remove all <none> images

docker rmi $(docker images | grep none | awk '{print $3}')

You can force removal by changing docker rmi to docker rmi -f although I do not recommend doing that.

Some of the <none> images could be related to other images so to be on safe side don't use -f tag.

-1

try

docker rmi -f $(docker images -a | awk 'NR> 1 || $2 = "<none>" {print $3}') , while there may be cleaner commands

Updated

  • That will also remove images which are not tagged <none> which is a big nono. – Karl Morrison Nov 25 '15 at 9:51
  • I have upated my answer – user2915097 Nov 25 '15 at 9:56
  • The command docker rmi -f $(docker images -a | awk 'NR> 1 || $2 = "" {print $3} does not do anything! – Karl Morrison Nov 25 '15 at 9:58
  • sorry, updated again – user2915097 Nov 25 '15 at 10:28
-1

Just remove the images using their IDs:

# docker rmi 5e2dfc857e73 d053e988f23d ...
-1

The dangling images are ghosts from the previous builds and pulls, simply delete them with : docker rmi $(docker images -f "dangling=true" -q)

  • The OP states that he did try this exact command already but it failed. Also, this answer has been given at least twice already. – CaringDev Apr 2 at 14:43
-3
docker rmi $(docker images -a -q)

Stated the following images where in use. I think this command gets rid of unwanted images.

  • doesn't this remove all images? – marianobianchi Jan 13 '17 at 14:19
  • 2
    this removes all unused images and it should not be marked as the correct answer. – Ghashange Mar 14 '17 at 17:01

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