37

Is there any way to compare which factorial number is greater among two numbers without calculating?
The scenario is i am creating a c# console application which takes two factorial inputs like

123!!!!!!
456!!!  

all i want to do is to compare which factorial value is greater than other, the piece of code what i did is

try
{
    string st = Console.ReadLine();
    Int64 factCount = 0;
    while (st.Contains('!'))
    {
       factCount = st.Where(w => w == '!').Count();
       st = st.Replace('!', ' ');

    };
    decimal result = 1 ;
    for (Int64 j = 0; j < factCount; j++)
    {
        UInt64 num = Convert.ToUInt64(st.Trim());
        for (UInt64 x = num; x > 0; x--)
        {
            result = result * x;
        }
    }
    if (factCount == 0)
    {
        result = Convert.ToUInt64(st.Trim());
    }


    string st2 = Console.ReadLine();
    Int64 factCount2 = 0;
    while (st2.Contains('!'))
    {
        factCount2 = st2.Where(w => w == '!').Count();
        st2 = st2.Replace('!', ' ');
    };
    decimal result2 = 1;
    for (Int64 j = 0; j < factCount2; j++)
    {
        UInt64 num = Convert.ToUInt64(st.Trim());
        for (UInt64 x = num; x > 0; x--)
        {
            result2 = result2 * x;
        }
    }
    if (factCount2 == 0)
    {
        result2 = Convert.ToUInt64(st2.Trim());
    }

    if (result == result2)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("x=y");
    }
    else if (result < result2)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("x<y");
    }
    else if (result > result2)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("x>y");
    }
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
    Console.WriteLine(ex.Message);
    Console.ReadLine();
}

but the error i'm getting is
value is too large or too small for decimal
I understood the error but is there any way to do this

Please suggest whether any other data type which accomodate value greater than decimal or is there any other way to compare these factorials

After implementing @Bathsheba suggestion i change a bit of my code

    string st = Console.ReadLine();
    int factCount = 0;
    while (st.Contains('!'))
    {
       factCount = st.Where(w => w == '!').Count();
       st = st.Replace('!', ' ');

    };

    string st2 = Console.ReadLine();
    int factCount2 = 0;
    while (st2.Contains('!'))
    {
        factCount2 = st2.Where(w => w == '!').Count();
        st2 = st2.Replace('!', ' ');
    };

    int resultFactCount = factCount - factCount2;
    decimal result = 1;
    decimal result2 = 1;

    if (resultFactCount > 0)
    {

        for (Int64 j = 0; j < resultFactCount; j++)
        {
            UInt64 num = Convert.ToUInt64(st.Trim());
            for (UInt64 x = num; x > 0; x--)
            {
                result = result * x;
            }
        }
        if (factCount == 0)
        {
            result = Convert.ToUInt64(st.Trim());
        }
        UInt64 num1 = Convert.ToUInt64(st.Trim());
        if (result == num1)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("x=y");
        }
        else if (result < num1)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("x<y");
        }
        else if (result > num1)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("x>y");
        }
    }
    else
    {
        int resultFactCount1 = System.Math.Abs(resultFactCount);
        for (Int64 j = 0; j < resultFactCount1; j++)
        {
            UInt64 num = Convert.ToUInt64(st.Trim());
            for (UInt64 x = num; x > 0; x--)
            {
                result2 = result2 * x;
            }
        }
        if (factCount2 == 0)
        {
            result2 = Convert.ToUInt64(st2.Trim());
        }
        UInt64 num1 = Convert.ToUInt64(st.Trim());

        if (result2 == num1)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("x=y");
        }
        else if (result2 < num1)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("x<y");
        }
        else if (result2 > num1)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("x>y");
        }
    }   

Sorry to say but still 123!!! is so huge that i'm getting the same error


Traditionally m!!...! with n !s means m(m-n)(m-2n).... however here is is taken as (...((m!)!)!...)!
Note from Alec, yes I know, this is an unfortunate notation, but you see the conventional definition is far more useful (in combinatorics, the place where factorials come from) than the one the OP wants.
I would put this in a comment but it'd be eclipsed by the others and this is quite important.

  • 8
    @jdweng Surely not with multifactorials, as in his example? – odyss-jii Nov 25 '15 at 12:35
  • 1
    @jdweng, but is 456! greater than (123!)! ? – thorkia Nov 25 '15 at 12:35
  • 10
    You don't need to compare the common trailing !. Comparing 456 to 123!!! is enough (if 123!!! is bigger than 456, since ! is continuous and strictly increasing, you know that (123!!!)!!! > (456)!!!. But that doesn't solve the problem, just reduce it. – Leherenn Nov 25 '15 at 12:38
  • 3
    Please, clarify the meaning of 456!!!. Is it ((456!)!)! or (456!!)! or something else? en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Double_factorial – Dmitry Bychenko Nov 25 '15 at 12:39
  • 7
    Another trick if exactitude is not paramount is to take the log of both then use Stirling's approximation: log (n!) ≃ n*log(n) - n. – Leherenn Nov 25 '15 at 12:49
52

Here, a!! is defined as (a!)!.

123!!!!!! is absolutely gigantic. I think you'd need more particles than there are in the universe if you were to write it down in ink.

You can't therefore compare the numbers directly. I conject that there is not a number class that can do this.

What you can do, is to consider the quotient 123!!!!!! / 456!!!. Many of the multiples will be similar, so you can cancel them. Note also that trailing ! will cancel. This is because x > y implies, and is implied by x! > y! where x and y are positive integers.

Eventually you'll reach a point where you can evaluate this as being less or greater than 1, so yielding your answer.

I can tell you on inspection that 123!!!!!! is larger since 123!!! is larger than 456.

  • 31
    I did and it's a mess. The cliche "do it in an object orientated way" applies here. I'd approach this problem by writing a class to represent an integer followed by n factorials. Parse each string to an instance of it. You could then build the initial "trailing !" canceller trivially. You'll end up with no more than one of the numbers having !. In your case, because I know that 123!!! contains 456 in its expansion, it must be larger. So your fancy class need no more than a parse, a canceller, and a comparison to an integral type. – Bathsheba Nov 25 '15 at 13:09
  • 13
    Great answer. A small addition: it's necessary to check three boundary cases: 0!!!...!!!!! = 1, 1!!...!!!!! = 1, 2!!...!!!!! = 2. – Mark Shevchenko Nov 25 '15 at 13:31
  • 11
    "Please go through my code", "I did and it's a mess" had me laughing. Great answer though and some very good advice. – jeremy radcliff Nov 25 '15 at 16:32
  • 2
    @AlecTeal Within the domain of discourse of "things that are factorial-able", which is the context of OP's question, the domain of ! is all that's relevant. The fact that you can extend the domain of discourse to all integers, or all reals, and then complain that x > y <=> x! > y! is false on the enlarged domain is irrelevant. Your argument is analogous to 'refuting' the claim "there is no number ε s.t. ε > 0 and ε² = 0" appearing in a real analysis textbook by saying "But there is such an ε in the dual numbers! The textbook is wrong!". – senshin Nov 26 '15 at 6:43
  • 1
    @senshin Or simpler: "There is no natural number X such that X's successor is 0" -> "Yes there is, it's -1!" – user253751 Nov 26 '15 at 9:59
22

Unlike the other answers, you can do it without any approximation.

Here it is :

123 !!!!!! > 456 !!! 

means actually

123 !!!!! > 456 !!
123 !!!! > 456 ! 

and also

123 !!! > 456  

So you only need to prove the above.It's simple because you have at least one operand which can fit into an UInt64

So this should give you something like this :

public class Program
{
    static bool LeftIsGreaterThanRightSide(UInt64 leftSide, int leftSidefactCount, UInt64 rightSide)
    {
        try
        {
            checked // for the OverflowException
            {
                UInt64 input2 = leftSide;
                int factCount = leftSidefactCount;
                UInt64 result = 1;

                for (Int64 j = 0; j < factCount; j++)
                {
                    UInt64 num = input2;
                    for (UInt64 x = num; x > 0; x--)
                    {
                        result = result * x;
                    }
                }

                // None of the operand are great or equal than UInt64.MaxValue
                // So let's compare the result normaly
                return result > rightSide; 
            }
        }
        catch (OverflowException)
        {
            // leftSide overflowed, rightSide is a representable UInt64 so leftSide > rightSide ; 
            return true; 
        }
    }


    static void Main()
    {
        String input1 = Console.ReadLine();
        String input2 = Console.ReadLine();

        int fact1Count = input1.Count(c => c == '!');
        int fact2Count = input2.Count(c => c == '!');

        UInt64 x = Convert.ToUInt64(input1.Replace("!", String.Empty).Trim());
        UInt64 y = Convert.ToUInt64(input2.Replace("!", String.Empty).Trim());

        x = x == 0 ? 1 : x ; // Handling 0 !
        y = y == 0 ? 1 : y; 

        if (fact1Count > fact2Count)
        {
            fact1Count = fact1Count - fact2Count;
            Console.WriteLine(LeftIsGreaterThanRightSide(x, fact1Count, y) ? "x > y" : "x <= y");
        }
        else
        {
            fact2Count = fact2Count - fact1Count;
            Console.WriteLine(LeftIsGreaterThanRightSide(y, fact2Count, x) ? "y > x" : "y <= x");
        }

        Console.ReadLine();
    }


}
  • 1
    just add a quick return in your for loop and it will be a lot faster and more robust (see my answer) – Falco Nov 25 '15 at 14:27
  • 4
    It would be waaayy better to have some struct with the number and the integer and the number of factorials and then implement some operator> on them than using that horrible LeftIsGreaterThanRightSide. I mean, just that name makes me throw up. Nice answer though – Synxis Nov 25 '15 at 20:52
  • 3
    Yes, early-terminate once you know which one is bigger – smci Nov 25 '15 at 22:41
14

For given numbers, assuming that 456!!! means ((456!)!)! we have

  123!!!!!! == (123!!!)!!!

and

  123!!! >>> 456 // >>> stands for "much, much...much larger", ">>" is not enough 

even 123! (which is 1.2e205) far larger than just 456

To estimate factorials' actual values, let's use Stirling approximation

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stirling%27s_approximation

i.e.

  ln(n!) == n * ln(n) - n
  lg(n!) == ln(n!)/ln(10) == n * ln(n) / ln(10) - n / ln(10) == n * lg(n) - n / ln(10)
      n! == n ** n / exp(n)

So ((456!)!)! is about

  lg(456!)       == 1014
  lg((456!)!)    == 1e1014 * 1014- 1e1014/ln(10) == 1e1017
  lg(((456!)!)!) == 1e(1e1017) 
     ((456!)!)!  == 1e(1e(1e1017))

which is extremely huge number (note triple exponentiation) and that's why can't be represented as naive BigInteger value.

  • 1
    "that's why can't be represented as naive BigInteger value" It can be represented instead, you just need a lot of memory. – edmz Nov 25 '15 at 14:19
  • 6
    @black: the amount of bits you need to represent such number is far, far beyond the number of elementary particles in the Universe :) – Dmitry Bychenko Nov 25 '15 at 14:22
  • Well yeah, but it can...theoretically. The universe's expanding, maybe in a future people reading SO will be able to compute and store 456! :) – edmz Nov 25 '15 at 14:32
  • 6
    @black expansion of universe is the increase of the distance between particles of the universe, not number of the particle ;-) – HadiRj Nov 25 '15 at 15:14
6

This should be easy:

As other have said you can remove all common "!" because x > y <==> x! > y!

The your program will essentially have to prove that a factorial (123!!!) is bigger than an ordinary number. You can solve this with a quick exit out of the loop. While calculating the factorial you can return as soon as the product is bigger than 456, since a factorial will always grow with additional iterations.

// While string parsing check if one number equals 0 and has at least
// one "!" - if yes set its value to 1 ( because 0! = 1! = 1 )

int x = 123;
int y = 456;
int numberOfFactorials = 3;

try
{
    for( int i = 0; i < numberOfFactorials; ++i )
    {
        for ( int j = x-1; j > 0; --j )
        {
            x *= j;
            // This quick exit will return after one iteration
            // because 123*122 > 456
            if ( x > y ) return "x is bigger than y";
        }
    }

    return x == y ? "gosh they are the same!"
                  : "x is smaller than y";
}
catch( OverflowException e )
{
   return "x Overflowed so it is bigger than y!";
}

You can also use BigInteger with this Method if you want to parse even bigger numbers for Input-Parameters.

  • 2
    Note that the equivalence you have given initially does not hold for x=1, y=0. – Codor Nov 25 '15 at 14:46
  • 1
    one and zero are special cases in which you could eliminate all Factorials immediately – Falco Nov 25 '15 at 15:13
  • This was my first thought as well, but you'll need to handle the overflow anyway; If y is big enough in relation to the max int value, and x is chosen suitably, the growing x will be smaller than y on one iteration and overflow on the next iteration before the comparison. For signed 32bit values, x=46342 and y=46343 (or any y>=46343 and 46342<=x<y) should work for this. (And x can be a lot smaller, too, as it can just grow to the proper size, possibly on the previous factorial iteration, eg. with 9!! vs. 362881) – Aleksi Torhamo Nov 26 '15 at 5:03
  • 2
    @AleksiTorhamo First you remove factorial symbols so that you compare x!!!>y. y is an constant and so does not overflow. So if the calculation of the left side overflows you can know that the left is larger than the right. The answer does not state that you don't need to handle it, it states that if it does happen you know your answer. – Taemyr Nov 26 '15 at 10:12
  • 1
    @AleksiTorhamo I adressed your concerns and added it to the code. But I concur that it will not be significantly faster - this depends entirely on the numbers. The other approach without fast exit will do a bunch of iterations for 2!!!!! and 3 as input, it will run iterations until the first value overflows and trigger exceptionhandling, which is costly. My approach will finish after one multiplication. – Falco Nov 26 '15 at 14:58
2

As other people said, 123!!!!!! and 456!!! are just too big to be represented by a computer, and a comparison of the type x!! <=> y! reduces to x! <=> y.

Once you get to the minimum possible number of ! (cutting them from the strings), you can evaluate the operands. One of the numbers will be a common integer (no factorial), so no work here. The other will have at least one factorial, else the comparison is trivial.

Suppose that the comparison is x! <=> y (one factorial). If x >= y, you're done. If x < y, evaluate x! and compare.

Suppose that the comparison is x!! <=> y (two factorials). Tabulating the smallest values:

1!! = 1! = 1
2!! = 2! = 2
3!! = 6! = 720
4!! = 24! = 620,448,401,733,239,439,360,000
5!! = 120! = about 6.6895 * 10^198
6!! = 720! = about 2.6012 * 10^1746

So, for about any y, x > 4 will result in x!! > y. For x <= 4, evaluate x!! and compare.

For more factorials, remember that x!!! = (x!)!!, evaluate x!, and use the step(s) above.

  • This is probably the fastest answer – miniBill Dec 4 '15 at 10:51
1

The BigInteger Type can handle large integers. But not large enough for your example.

Small factorials can be factored into their prime factors, without having to compute the factorial itself first, and the identical factors can be cancelled.

You can also cancel the trailing !'s as suggested by Leherenn above, since 123!!! is larger than 456, (123!!!)!!! will also be larger than (456)!!!.

  • 2
    You'll run out of RAM if you try to calculate these numbers out and put them into a BigInteger. I'm confident saying this not knowing how much RAM you have. – djechlin Nov 25 '15 at 16:44
  • Can you suggest an algorithm to prime factor these numbers that will run on less RAM in the universe and complete before the sun explodes? – djechlin Nov 25 '15 at 16:45
  • 1) update your answer to explain how "large" of a number it can handle, it certainly can't handle the numbers in the OP; 2) specify what "in this case" means, because in the only "case" presented in the question you can not "factor these numbers", then this will at least not be a wrong/misleading answer and I will remove my downvote; and we don't need to discuss what programming assignments or production use cases are valid and what are not. – djechlin Nov 25 '15 at 19:59
  • @djechlin Obviously the OP did not realize how big these numbers are. So I assumed the numbers in the question were just to explain the question (as he says) . (This explains the 1-6 digits.) This is probably not a program to be used in "production". For small numbers - as a programming assignment - my answer is correct. (for example 6!! compared to 8!) – User42 Nov 25 '15 at 19:59
  • @djechlin That makes sense. I edited my answer. – User42 Nov 25 '15 at 20:04
0

Let's define a type to represent an operation of repeated factorials:

public struct RepeatedFactorial
{
  private readonly int _baseNumber;
  private readonly int _repeats;
  public int BaseNumber
  {
    get { return _baseNumber; }
  }
  public int Repeats {
    get { return _repeats; }
  }
  public RepeatedFactorial(int baseNumber, int repeats)
  {
    if (baseNumber < 0 || repeats < 0) throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException();
    _baseNumber = baseNumber;
    _repeats = repeats;
  }
}

Now, if we implement an IComparable<Factorial> we can find the answer wanted.

public int CompareTo(RepeatedFactorial other)
{
  // ?
}

Let's consider some of the simpler cases first.

public int CompareTo(RepeatedFactorial other)
{
  if (BaseNumber == 0)
  {
    // If Repeats is zero the value of this is zero, otherwise
    // this is the same as a value with BaseNumber == 1 and no factorials.
    // So delegate to the handling of that case.
    if (Repeats == 0) return other.BaseNumber == 0 && other.Repeats == 0 ? 0 : -1;
    return new RepeatedFactorial(1, 0).CompareTo(other);
  }
  if (other.BaseNumber == 0)
    // Likewise
    return other.Repeats == 0 ? 1 : CompareTo(new RepeatedFactorial (1, 0));
  if (Repeats == other.Repeats)
    // X < Y == X! < Y!. X > Y == X! > Y! And so on.
    return BaseNumber.CompareTo(other.BaseNumber);
  ???
}

Okay, the only cases not handled are where either this has fewer repeated factorials than other or vice versa. Let's turn one of those case into the other so we've less to deal with:

public int CompareTo(RepeatedFactorial other)
{
  if (BaseNumber == 0)
  {
    // If Repeats is zero the value of this is zero, otherwise
    // this is the same as a value with BaseNumber == 1 and no factorials.
    // So delegate to the handling of that case.
    if (Repeats == 0) return other.BaseNumber == 0 && other.Repeats == 0 ? 0 : -1;
    return new RepeatedFactorial(1, 0).CompareTo(other);
  }
  if (other.BaseNumber == 0)
    // Likewise
    return other.Repeats == 0 ? 1 : CompareTo(new RepeatedFactorial (1, 0));
  if (Repeats == other.Repeats)
    // X < Y == X! < Y!. X > Y == X! > Y! And so on.
    return BaseNumber.CompareTo(other.BaseNumber);
  if (Repeats > other.Repeats)
    return -other.CompareTo(this);
  ???
}

Now we only have to worry about this having fewer repeats than other. Since X > Y implies X! > Y! and so on we can reduce this problem down to one where we know this has zero repeats:

public int CompareTo(RepeatedFactorial other)
{
  if (BaseNumber == 0)
  {
    // If Repeats is zero the value of this is zero, otherwise
    // this is the same as a value with BaseNumber == 1 and no factorials.
    // So delegate to the handling of that case.
    if (Repeats == 0) return other.BaseNumber == 0 && other.Repeats == 0 ? 0 : -1;
    return new RepeatedFactorial(1, 0).CompareTo(other);
  }
  if (other.BaseNumber == 0)
    // Likewise
      return other.Repeats == 0 ? 1 : CompareTo(new RepeatedFactorial (1, 0));
  if (Repeats == other.Repeats)
    // X < Y == X! < Y!. X > Y == X! > Y! And so on.
    return BaseNumber.CompareTo(other.BaseNumber);
  if (Repeats > other.Repeats)
    return -other.CompareTo(this);
  if (Repeats != 0)
    return new RepeatedFactorial(BaseNumber, 0).CompareTo(new RepeatedFactorial(other.BaseNumber, other.Repeats - Repeats);
  ???
}

Now we need to how this.BaseNumber compares to other.BaseNumber with the appropriate number of factorials applied. Obviously if other.BaseNumber is greater than 12 then since 13! is greater than int.MaxValue it must be greater than this.BaseNumber:

public int CompareTo(RepeatedFactorial other)
{
  if (BaseNumber == 0)
  {
    // If Repeats is zero the value of this is zero, otherwise
    // this is the same as a value with BaseNumber == 1 and no factorials.
    // So delegate to the handling of that case.
    if (Repeats == 0) return other.BaseNumber == 0 && other.Repeats == 0 ? 0 : -1;
    return new RepeatedFactorial(1, 0).CompareTo(other);
  }
  if (other.BaseNumber == 0)
    // Likewise
    return other.Repeats == 0 ? 1 : CompareTo(new RepeatedFactorial (1, 0));
  if (Repeats == other.Repeats)
    // X < Y == X! < Y!. X > Y == X! > Y! And so on.
    return BaseNumber.CompareTo(other.BaseNumber);
  if (Repeats > other.Repeats)
    return -other.CompareTo(this);
  if (Repeats != 0)
    return new RepeatedFactorial(BaseNumber, 0).CompareTo(new RepeatedFactorial(other.BaseNumber, other.Repeats - Repeats);
  if (other.BaseNumber > 12)
    return -1; // this is less than other
  ???
}

Now we're left calculating the actual number. However if at the start of a cycle of factorials we have 13 or higher then we can return -1 by the same logic as above. Otherwise if we ever end up with a number greater than this.BaseNumber we can return -1 too.

public int CompareTo(RepeatedFactorial other)
{
    if (BaseNumber == 0)
    {
      // If Repeats is zero the value of this is zero, otherwise
      // this is the same as a value with BaseNumber == 1 and no factorials.
      // So delegate to the handling of that case.
      if (Repeats == 0) return other.BaseNumber == 0 && other.Repeats == 0 ? 0 : -1;
      return new RepeatedFactorial(1, 0).CompareTo(other);
    }
    if (other.BaseNumber == 0)
      // Likewise
      return other.Repeats == 0 ? 1 : CompareTo(new RepeatedFactorial (1, 0));
  if (Repeats == other.Repeats)
    // X < Y == X! < Y!. X > Y == X! > Y! And so on.
    return BaseNumber.CompareTo(other.BaseNumber);
  if (Repeats > other.Repeats)
    return -other.CompareTo(this);
  if (Repeats != 0)
    return new RepeatedFactorial(BaseNumber, 0).CompareTo(new RepeatedFactorial(other.BaseNumber, other.Repeats - Repeats);
  int accum = other.BaseNumber;
  for (int rep = 0; rep != other.Repeats; ++rep)
  {
    if (accum > 12 || accum > BaseNumber) return -1;
    for (int mult = accum - 1; mult > 1; --mult)
    accum *= mult;
  }
  return BaseNumber.CompareTo(accum);
}

And hence we have our answer and never have to calculate a factorial greater than 12!.

Putting it all together:

public struct RepeatedFactorial : IComparable<RepeatedFactorial>
{
  private readonly int _baseNumber;
  private readonly int _repeats;
  public int BaseNumber
  {
    get { return _baseNumber; }
  }
  public int Repeats {
    get { return _repeats; }
  }
  public RepeatedFactorial(int baseNumber, int repeats)
  {
    if (baseNumber < 0 || repeats < 0) throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException();
    _baseNumber = baseNumber;
    _repeats = repeats;
  }
  public int CompareTo(RepeatedFactorial other)
  {
    if (BaseNumber == 0)
    {
      // If Repeats is zero the value of this is zero, otherwise
      // this is the same as a value with BaseNumber == 1 and no factorials.
      // So delegate to the handling of that case.
      if (Repeats == 0) return other.BaseNumber == 0 && other.Repeats == 0 ? 0 : -1;
      return new RepeatedFactorial(1, 0).CompareTo(other);
    }
    if (other.BaseNumber == 0)
      // Likewise
      return other.Repeats == 0 ? 1 : CompareTo(new RepeatedFactorial (1, 0));
    if (Repeats == other.Repeats)
      // X < Y == X! < Y!. X > Y == X! > Y! And so on.
      return BaseNumber.CompareTo(other.BaseNumber);
    if (Repeats > other.Repeats)
      return -other.CompareTo(this);
    if (Repeats != 0)
      return new RepeatedFactorial(BaseNumber, 0).CompareTo(new RepeatedFactorial(other.BaseNumber, other.Repeats - Repeats));
    int accum = other.BaseNumber;
    for (int rep = 0; rep != other.Repeats; ++rep)
    {
      if (accum > 12 || accum > BaseNumber) return -1;
      for (int mult = accum - 1; mult > 1; --mult)
        accum *= mult;
    }
    return BaseNumber.CompareTo(accum);
  }
}

Edit:

I just realised you were in fact using 64 bit values in your question. That's easily adapted for, and we still never have to go above calculating 20!

public struct RepeatedFactorial : IComparable<RepeatedFactorial>
{
  private readonly ulong _baseNumber;
  private readonly long _repeats;
  public ulong BaseNumber
  {
    get { return _baseNumber; }
  }
  public long Repeats {
    get { return _repeats; }
  }
  public RepeatedFactorial(ulong baseNumber, long repeats)
  {
    if (baseNumber < 0 || repeats < 0) throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException();
    _baseNumber = baseNumber;
    _repeats = repeats;
  }
  public int CompareTo(RepeatedFactorial other)
  {
    if (BaseNumber == 0)
      // This is the same as a value with BaseNumber == 1 and no factorials.
      // So delegate to the handling of that case.
      return new RepeatedFactorial(1, 0).CompareTo(other);
    if (other.BaseNumber == 0)
      // Likewise
      return CompareTo(new RepeatedFactorial (1, 0));
    if (Repeats == other.Repeats)
      // X < Y == X! < Y!. X > Y == X! > Y! And so on.
      return BaseNumber.CompareTo(other.BaseNumber);
    if (Repeats > other.Repeats)
      return -other.CompareTo(this);
    if (Repeats != 0)
      return new RepeatedFactorial(BaseNumber, 0).CompareTo(new RepeatedFactorial(other.BaseNumber, other.Repeats - Repeats));
    ulong accum = other.BaseNumber;
    for (long rep = 0; rep != other.Repeats; ++rep)
    {
      if (accum > 20 || accum > BaseNumber) return -1;
      for (ulong mult = accum - 1; mult > 1; --mult)
        accum *= mult;
    }
    return BaseNumber.CompareTo(accum);
  }
}
0

For positive integers, in case both sides have the same number of factorials, it'd be as simple as comparing the two numbers

123!!!!
456!!!!

456 > 123
456!!!! > 123!!!!

Otherwise, comparing the two factorials, comes down to this

123!!!!!!
456!!!

(123!!!)!!!
(456!!!)

123!!!
456

At this point we will try to evaluate the factorials one by one, until we have surpassed the other number.

Since the other number is a number that can be stored in a variable, this mean that weather we have reached computationally a higher number, or have caught an overflow exception, then it's a bigger number, otherwise it's a smaller one.

The following is a pesudo-code, not an actual code:

int max_factorial (int x, int x_fact, int y, int y_fact)
{
    int A=1,B=1,F=0,product=1,sum=0;

    if (x_fact == y_fact) return (x>y?x:y);

    if (x_fact > y_fact)
    {
        A = x; B = y; F = x_fact-y_fact;
    }
    else
    {
        A = y; B = x; F = y_fact-x_fact;
    }

    for (int k=0; k<F; k++)
    {
        try
        {
            for (int i=1; i<A; i++)
            {
                // multiplication in terms of addition
                // P * i = P + P + .. P } i times
                sum = 0; for (int p=0; p<i; p++) sum += product;
                product = product + sum;
                if (product > B) return A;
            }
        }
        catch (OverflowException e)
        {
            return A;
        }
    }

    return B;
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.