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I'm creating a class that has a constructor intialized from const char* which should safely construct an object using data provided in the buffer which should contain a string. My worries are, that the user can use this constructor with wrong data, e.g. NULL pointer or pointer to not-allocated memory or something like that. The point is, in that case I want to finish creating object (which will be in undefined, but correct state), without causing segfault if, for example, user sent me a pointer to data I shouldn't read. I thought of sending all input validation to std::string constructor, so the constructor would look like this:

Foo(const char *s) : Foo(std::string(s)) {}

But my teacher called this a "wrong idea". So, what is the proper way to deal with this situation then?

One more thing, I can't use exceptions in that case (this is part of my homework assignment in course which hasn't taught it yet).

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    You do not need this - the compiler is clever enough to figure out to use the foo(std::string) constructor for you – Ed Heal Nov 25 '15 at 14:49
  • Actually - I need this. I need the constructor foo(std::string) to be explicit, to prevent something like foo x = "bar". – qiubit Nov 25 '15 at 14:52
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    “undefined, but correct state” seems like a contradiction in terms. In fact, rather than creating an undefined object you should almost certainly throw an exception in the constructor to prevent a faulty object from being created. This depends on the use-case of course, but it’s so often the correct solution that I’d almost call it an absolute law. – Konrad Rudolph Nov 25 '15 at 14:52
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    @qiubit Then declare it explicit, this works perfectly fine. – Konrad Rudolph Nov 25 '15 at 14:53
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    @KonradRudolph I agree with you, but I can't use exceptions yet, see my update – qiubit Nov 25 '15 at 14:55
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The problem is that there are some things you absolutely cannot check for. The biggest of the group is a pointer to invalid memory. For example :

char* blarg = new char[50];
delete blarg;
Foo(blarg);

Here is another conversation about what you're asking. Some good answers are there but they basically say the same thing. When dealing with a pointer input there is no way to be 100% sure the user didn't do something stupid like calling delete on the pointer before passing it in.

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My worries are, that the user can use this constructor with wrong data, e.g. NULL pointer or pointer to not-allocated memory or something like that. The point is, in that case I want to finish creating object (which will be in undefined, but correct state)

It's impossible to detect if a pointer is valid. It's has to be the responsibility of the caller to guarantee that it points to allocated memory.

However, you can detect if a pointer is null. You can check that and if it is, then set the state of the object without dereferencing the pointer.

I thought of sending all input validation to std::string constructor

But my teacher called this a "wrong idea".

Your teacher is correct. That won't help because std::string also requires and assumes that the input is valid. Constructing it with an invalid pointer leads to undefined behaviour.

So, what is the proper way to deal with this situation then?

Simply requiring the caller to guarantee the validity of the pointer is the right thing to - and all you can - do. If you want to check for null, feel free to do it.

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If you have an error in your constructor, throw. That's what it's there for. The object isn't constructed and the client (who passed in the erroneous pointer) is properly told so.

  • This is not really an answer since OP has clearly stated he can't use exceptions – BlackDwarf Nov 25 '15 at 14:58
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    see his update One more thing, I can't use exceptions in that case. – user1810087 Nov 25 '15 at 14:58
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    His TEACHER, as part of his HOMEWORK assignment, has said that he CANNOT do that. – soulsabr Nov 25 '15 at 15:03
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    @soulsabr His TEACHER should go down to the clue boutique and buy a FRIGGIN clue.This isn't C++. – Paul Evans Nov 25 '15 at 15:07
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    @soulsabr Yes, and C++ is designed in such a way that in this scenario you throw. Anything else isn't going to be safe and should have a very solid justification for doing so and is a C++ workaround. – Paul Evans Nov 25 '15 at 15:48
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If you want check that your class accept as arguments only std::string and const char[] you can write something like this:

class Foo {
public:

    template<typename U>
    Foo(U &&val, typename std::enable_if<std::is_same<typename std::remove_reference<U>::type, std::string>::value ||
        std::is_array<typename std::remove_reference<decltype(val)>::type>::value, void>::type* = nullptr): field_(val) {}
private:
    std::string field_;
};

Then:

Foo foo("aa");//accept
std::string str("bb");
Foo foo2(str);//accept
Foo fnull(NULL);//compile time error

of course this solution not work if you want pass just pointer to char.

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