5

I try to implement repository pattern in Go app (simple web service) and try to find better way to escape code duplication.

Here is a code

Interfaces are:

type IRoleRepository interface {
    GetAll() ([]Role, error)
}

type ISaleChannelRepository interface {
    GetAll() ([]SaleChannel, error)
}

And implementation:

func (r *RoleRepository) GetAll() ([]Role, error) {
        var result []Role
        var err error
        var rows *sql.Rows

        if err != nil {
            return result, err
        }

        connection := r.provider.GetConnection()
        defer connection.Close()

        rows, err = connection.Query("SELECT Id,Name FROM Position")
        defer rows.Close()

        if err != nil {
            return result, err
        }

        for rows.Next() {
            entity := new(Role)
            err = sqlstruct.Scan(entity, rows)

            if err != nil {
                return result, err
            }

            result = append(result, *entity)
        }
        err = rows.Err()
        if err != nil {
            return result, err
        }

        return result, err
    }

    func (r *SaleChannelRepository) GetAll() ([]SaleChannel, error) {
        var result []SaleChannel
        var err error
        var rows *sql.Rows

        if err != nil {
            return result, err
        }

        connection := r.provider.GetConnection()
        defer connection.Close()

        rows, err = connection.Query("SELECT DISTINCT SaleChannel 'Name' FROM Employee")
        defer rows.Close()

        if err != nil {
            return result, err
        }

        for rows.Next() {
            entity := new(SaleChannel)
            err = sqlstruct.Scan(entity, rows)

            if err != nil {
                return result, err
            }

            result = append(result, *entity)
        }
        err = rows.Err()
        if err != nil {
            return result, err
        }

        return result, err
    }

As you can see differences are in a few words. I try to find something like Generics from C#, but didnt find.

Can anyone help me?

  • 6
    I'd recommend to not writing Java or C# code in Go. – Volker Nov 25 '15 at 18:29
  • 3
    i dont write Java code in Go. I try to not duplicate my code . Is any ways to do it? Or it is not? – solo12zw74 Nov 25 '15 at 18:51
22

No, Go does not have generics and won't have them in the forseeable future.

You have three options:

  • Refactor your code so that you have a single function which accepts an SQL statement and another function, and:

    1. Queries the DB with the provided statement.
    2. Iterates over the result's rows.
    3. For each row, calls the provided function whose task is to scan the row.

    In this case, you'll have a single generic "querying" function, and the differences will be solely in "scanning" functions.

    Several variations on this are possible but I suspect you have the idea.

  • Use the sqlx package which basically is to SQL-driven databases what encoding/json is to JSON data streams: it uses reflection on your types to create and execute SQL to populate them.

    This way you'll get reusability on another level: you simply won't write boilerplate code.

  • Use code generation which is the Go-native way of having "code templates" (that's what generics are about).

    This way, you (usually) write a Go program which takes some input (in whatever format you wish), reads it and writes out one or more files which contain Go code, which is then compiled.

    In your, very simple, case, you can start with a template of your Go function and some sort of a table which maps SQL statement to the types to create from the data selected.


I'd note that your code indeed looks woefully unidiomatic.

No one in their right mind implements "repository patterns" in Go, but that's sort of okay so long it keeps you happy—we all are indoctrinated to a certain degree with the languages/environments we're accustomed to,—but your connection := r.provider.GetConnection() looks alarming: the Go's database/sql is drastically different from "popular" environments and frameworks so I'd highly recommend to start with this and this.

  • great info, so is there any other design pattern we can apply to abstract the data layer? Especially where DDD advocates Repository pattern, and you mentioned its a bad idea to have repository pattern in GO. – Roy Lee Apr 16 '16 at 19:47
  • 3
    @Roylee, I'm afraid you got fixated on those pesky "patterns" as oh so many folks do. Software engeneering is not about, when confronted with a problem, looking through a catalog of patterns to see which one fits. I'd recommend 1) stop thinking about patterns; 2) look at what features the language has; 3) look at your problem; 4) work out what language features could help. – kostix Apr 19 '16 at 10:43
  • 1
    @Roylee, typically, that pattern gibberish gets invoked when one wants to abstract something away -- to ease testing (possibly through mocking) etc. If that's what you need, look at Go interfaces: note that the whole Go's standard library is built on them -- you will see things like io.Reader and io.Writer etc everywhere, and they are interfaces. Hence if you need to decouple two parts of the code apart, create a set of interfaces, and make the "consumer" part of the code use them, and the "producer" part of the code create things implementing those interface. – kostix Apr 19 '16 at 10:46
  • 1
    ...its not about when confronted with a problem, looking through a catalog of patterns to see which one fits., this piercing straight into my heart. I understand now, and that's really good advice. Thank you @kostix – Roy Lee Apr 19 '16 at 10:55
2

Forgive me if I'm misunderstanding, but a better pattern might be something like the following:

type RepositoryItem interface {
    Name() string // for example
}

type Repository interface {
    GetAll() ([]RepositoryItem, error)
}

At the moment, you essentially have multiple interfaces for each type of repository, so unless you're going to implement multiple types of RoleRepository, you might as well not have the interface.

Having generic Repository and RepositoryItem interfaces might make your code more extensible (not to mention easier to test) in the long run.

A contrived example might be (if we assume a Repository vaguely correlates to a backend) implementations such as MySQLRepository and MongoDBRepository. By abstracting the functionality of the repository, you're protecting against future mutations.

I would very much advise seeing @kostix's answer also, though.

  • quick question: Does RepositoryItem mean an entity? – Roy Lee Apr 16 '16 at 19:56
  • 1
    @Roylee it's a while since I've looked at this, but I think yes, essentially. – mattsch Apr 17 '16 at 11:54
0

interface{} is the "generic type" in Go. I can imagine doing something like this:

package main

import "fmt"

type IRole struct {
    RoleId uint
}

type ISaleChannel struct {
    Profitable bool
}

type GenericRepo interface{
    GetAll([]interface{})
}

// conceptual repo to store all Roles and SaleChannels
type Repo struct {
    IRoles        []IRole
    ISaleChannels []ISaleChannel
}

func (r *Repo) GetAll(ifs []interface{}) {

    // database implementation here before type switch 

    for _, v := range ifs {
        switch v := v.(type) {
        default:
                fmt.Printf("unexpected type %T\n", v)
        case IRole:
                fmt.Printf("Role %t\n", v)            
                r.IRoles = append(r.IRoles, v)
        case ISaleChannel:
                fmt.Printf("SaleChannel %d\n", v)
                r.ISaleChannels = append(r.ISaleChannels, v)
        }
    }
}

func main() {

    getter := new(Repo)

    // mock slice
    data := []interface{}{
        IRole{1},
        IRole{2},
        IRole{3},
        ISaleChannel{true},
        ISaleChannel{false},
        IRole{4},
    }

    getter.GetAll(data)

    fmt.Println("IRoles: ", getter.IRoles)
    fmt.Println("ISaleChannels: ", getter.ISales)
}

This way you don't have to end up with two structs and/or interfaces for IRole and ISale

  • 4
    IName is a c# nameing convention for interfaces, which is likely where the op got the idea. Using those names for structs in this example is rather confusing – Steve Aug 10 '17 at 17:09

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