This question already has an answer here:

a = [1,2,3]
a.uniq!  # nil
a.uniq  # [1,2,3]

Why a.uniq! is not [1,2,3] ?

Let me know the reason. Thank you!

marked as duplicate by Mike S, mu is too short ruby Nov 25 '15 at 18:17

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

most of the methods ending with bang (!) change the variable, while those without it just return the altered variable.

So, if you have something like this:

a = [1, 1, 2, 3]

a.uniq will return [1, 2, 3], but wont alter a, while a! will alter a to be equal to [1, 2, 3]

[1] pry(main)> a = [1,1,2,3]
=> [1, 1, 2, 3]
[2] pry(main)> a.uniq
=> [1, 2, 3]
[3] pry(main)> a
=> [1, 1, 2, 3]
[4] pry(main)> a.uniq!
=> [1, 2, 3]
[5] pry(main)> a
=> [1, 2, 3]
[6] pry(main)> a.uniq!
=> nil
[7] pry(main)> a
=> [1, 2, 3]
  • 3
    It is worth noting that, while the bang is used to denote "dangerous" methods in ruby as @bosskovic said, you can't always safely assume this is the case. For instance, a number of active record methods (such as .save! and .create!) use the bang to denote that they will raise an exception if they fail instead of returning false. It's safest to look them up on a method-by-method basis, as there is no enforcing that either of these conventions are followed. – ConnorCMcKee Nov 25 '15 at 18:12
  • This answer does not explain the nil. – Nawaz Feb 12 at 8:14

You need to read the Ruby documentation.

The uniq method returns a new array by removing duplicate values in self. If no duplicates are found, the same array value is returned.

a = [ "a", "a", "b", "b", "c" ]
a.uniq  # => ["a", "b", "c"]

b = [ "a", "b", "c" ]
b.uniq  # => ["a", "b", "c"]

The uniq! method removes duplicate elements from self and returns nil if no changes are made (that is, no duplicates are found).

a = [ "a", "a", "b", "b", "c" ]
a.uniq!   # => ["a", "b", "c"]

b = [ "a", "b", "c" ]
b.uniq!   # => nil
  • 1
    Is not the first one "uniq"? – Yonggoo Noh Nov 25 '15 at 18:18
  • 1
    this answer explains the nil. +1. – Nawaz Feb 12 at 8:15

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