40

I am trying to convert a DataTable to an IEnumerable. Where T is a custom type I created. I know I can do it by creating a List but I was think there was a slicker way to do it using IEnumerable. Here is what I have now.

    private IEnumerable<TankReading> ConvertToTankReadings(DataTable dataTable)
    {
        var tankReadings = new List<TankReading>();
        foreach (DataRow row in dataTable.Rows)
        {
            var tankReading = new TankReading
                                  {
                                      TankReadingsID = Convert.ToInt32(row["TRReadingsID"]),
                                      TankID = Convert.ToInt32(row["TankID"]),
                                      ReadingDateTime = Convert.ToDateTime(row["ReadingDateTime"]),
                                      ReadingFeet = Convert.ToInt32(row["ReadingFeet"]),
                                      ReadingInches = Convert.ToInt32(row["ReadingInches"]),
                                      MaterialNumber = row["MaterialNumber"].ToString(),
                                      EnteredBy = row["EnteredBy"].ToString(),
                                      ReadingPounds = Convert.ToDecimal(row["ReadingPounds"]),
                                      MaterialID = Convert.ToInt32(row["MaterialID"]),
                                      Submitted = Convert.ToBoolean(row["Submitted"]),
                                  };
            tankReadings.Add(tankReading);
        }
        return tankReadings.AsEnumerable();
    }

The key part being I am creating a List then returning it using AsEnumerable().

45

Nothing wrong with that implementation. You might give the yield keyword a shot, see how you like it:

private IEnumerable<TankReading> ConvertToTankReadings(DataTable dataTable)
    {
        foreach (DataRow row in dataTable.Rows)
        {
            yield return new TankReading
                                  {
                                      TankReadingsID = Convert.ToInt32(row["TRReadingsID"]),
                                      TankID = Convert.ToInt32(row["TankID"]),
                                      ReadingDateTime = Convert.ToDateTime(row["ReadingDateTime"]),
                                      ReadingFeet = Convert.ToInt32(row["ReadingFeet"]),
                                      ReadingInches = Convert.ToInt32(row["ReadingInches"]),
                                      MaterialNumber = row["MaterialNumber"].ToString(),
                                      EnteredBy = row["EnteredBy"].ToString(),
                                      ReadingPounds = Convert.ToDecimal(row["ReadingPounds"]),
                                      MaterialID = Convert.ToInt32(row["MaterialID"]),
                                      Submitted = Convert.ToBoolean(row["Submitted"]),
                                  };
        }

    }

Also the AsEnumerable isn't necessary, as List<T> is already an IEnumerable<T>

  • Matt Greer thanks for your answer. This looks good. I think I'll give it a try and see what happens. – mpenrow Aug 3 '10 at 13:26
  • This answer worked for me very well. Thanks! – Matt P Oct 28 '15 at 14:46
57

There's also a DataSetExtension method called "AsEnumerable()" (in System.Data) that takes a DataTable and returns an Enumerable. See the MSDN doc for more details, but it's basically as easy as:

dataTable.AsEnumerable()

The downside is that it's enumerating DataRow, not your custom class. A "Select()" LINQ call could convert the row data, however:

private IEnumerable<TankReading> ConvertToTankReadings(DataTable dataTable)
{
    return dataTable.AsEnumerable().Select(row => new TankReading      
            {      
                TankReadingsID = Convert.ToInt32(row["TRReadingsID"]),      
                TankID = Convert.ToInt32(row["TankID"]),      
                ReadingDateTime = Convert.ToDateTime(row["ReadingDateTime"]),      
                ReadingFeet = Convert.ToInt32(row["ReadingFeet"]),      
                ReadingInches = Convert.ToInt32(row["ReadingInches"]),      
                MaterialNumber = row["MaterialNumber"].ToString(),      
                EnteredBy = row["EnteredBy"].ToString(),      
                ReadingPounds = Convert.ToDecimal(row["ReadingPounds"]),      
                MaterialID = Convert.ToInt32(row["MaterialID"]),      
                Submitted = Convert.ToBoolean(row["Submitted"]),      
            });
}
  • JaredReisinger thanks for your help. The dataTable.AsEnumerable is very interesting. I'll have to investigate that one. – mpenrow Aug 3 '10 at 13:25
  • Oooh, nice. I hadn't noticed dataTable.AsEnumerable(), and was always doing the longer, uglier: dataTable.Rows.Cast<DataSetName.SomeLongDataTableRowName>() – Adam Nofsinger May 13 '11 at 16:33
  • 10
    The AsEnumerable extension method is found in the System.Data namespace but be sure to reference the System.Data.DataSetExtensions assembly to use it. – jhappoldt Jan 3 '13 at 20:38
  • Use .Cast<DataRowView>() extension for data views. – Der_Meister Dec 22 '15 at 8:19
  • If you're using an old version of .NET, you can also do dataTable.Cast<DataRow>() to get an IEnumerable<DataRow>. – codeMonkey Feb 8 at 21:46
1

Simple method using System.Data.DataSetExtensions:

table.AsEnumerable().Select(row => new TankReading{
        TankReadingsID = Convert.ToInt32(row["TRReadingsID"]),
        TankID = Convert.ToInt32(row["TankID"]),
        ReadingDateTime = Convert.ToDateTime(row["ReadingDateTime"]),
        ReadingFeet = Convert.ToInt32(row["ReadingFeet"]),
        ReadingInches = Convert.ToInt32(row["ReadingInches"]),
        MaterialNumber = row["MaterialNumber"].ToString(),
        EnteredBy = row["EnteredBy"].ToString(),
        ReadingPounds = Convert.ToDecimal(row["ReadingPounds"]),
        MaterialID = Convert.ToInt32(row["MaterialID"]),
        Submitted = Convert.ToBoolean(row["Submitted"]),
    });

Or:

TankReading TankReadingFromDataRow(DataRow row){
    return new TankReading{
        TankReadingsID = Convert.ToInt32(row["TRReadingsID"]),
        TankID = Convert.ToInt32(row["TankID"]),
        ReadingDateTime = Convert.ToDateTime(row["ReadingDateTime"]),
        ReadingFeet = Convert.ToInt32(row["ReadingFeet"]),
        ReadingInches = Convert.ToInt32(row["ReadingInches"]),
        MaterialNumber = row["MaterialNumber"].ToString(),
        EnteredBy = row["EnteredBy"].ToString(),
        ReadingPounds = Convert.ToDecimal(row["ReadingPounds"]),
        MaterialID = Convert.ToInt32(row["MaterialID"]),
        Submitted = Convert.ToBoolean(row["Submitted"]),
    };
}

// Now you can do this
table.AsEnumerable().Select(row => return TankReadingFromDataRow(row));

Or, better yet, create a TankReading(DataRow r) constructor, then this becomes:

    table.AsEnumerable().Select(row => return new TankReading(row));
1

If you are producing the DataTable from an SQL query, have you considered simply using Dapper instead?

Then, instead of making a SqlCommand with SqlParameters and a DataTable and a DataAdapter and on and on, which you then have to laboriously convert to a class, you just define the class, make the query column names match the field names, and the parameters are bound easily by name. You already have the TankReading class defined, so it will be really simple!

using Dapper;

// Below can be SqlConnection cast to DatabaseConnection, too.
DatabaseConnection connection = // whatever
IEnumerable<TankReading> tankReadings = connection.Query<TankReading>(
   "SELECT * from TankReading WHERE Value = @value",
   new { value = "tank1" } // note how `value` maps to `@value`
);
return tankReadings;

Now isn't that awesome? Dapper is very optimized and will give you darn near equivalent performance as reading directly with a DataAdapter.

If your class has any logic in it at all or is immutable or has no parameterless constructor, then you probably do need to have a DbTankReading class (as a pure POCO/Plain Old Class Object):

// internal because it should only be used in the data source project and not elsewhere
internal sealed class DbTankReading {
   int TankReadingsID { get; set; }
   DateTime? ReadingDateTime { get; set; }
   int ReadingFeet { get; set; }
   int ReadingInches { get; set; }
   string MaterialNumber { get; set; }
   string EnteredBy { get; set; }
   decimal ReadingPounds { get; set; }
   int MaterialID { get; set; }
   bool Submitted { get; set; }
}

You'd use that like this:

IEnumerable<TankReading> tankReadings = connection
   .Query<DbTankReading>(
      "SELECT * from TankReading WHERE Value = @value",
      new { value = "tank1" } // note how `value` maps to `@value`
   )
   .Select(tr => new TankReading(
      tr.TankReadingsID,
      tr.ReadingDateTime,
      tr.ReadingFeet,
      tr.ReadingInches,
      tr.MaterialNumber,
      tr.EnteredBy,
      tr.ReadingPounds,
      tr.MaterialID,
      tr.Submitted
   });

Despite the mapping work, this is still less painful than the data table method. This also lets you perform some kind of logic, though if the logic is any more than very simple straight-across mapping, I'd put the logic into a separate TankReadingMapper class.

0

Universal extension method for DataTable. May be somebody be interesting. Idea creating dynamic properties I take from another post: https://stackoverflow.com/a/15819760/8105226

    public static IEnumerable<dynamic> AsEnumerable(this DataTable dt)
    {
        List<dynamic> result = new List<dynamic>();
        Dictionary<string, object> d;
        foreach (DataRow dr in dt.Rows)
        {
            d = new Dictionary<string, object>();

            foreach (DataColumn dc in dt.Columns)
                d.Add(dc.ColumnName, dr[dc]);

            result.Add(GetDynamicObject(d));
        }
        return result.AsEnumerable<dynamic>();
    }

    public static dynamic GetDynamicObject(Dictionary<string, object> properties)
    {
        return new MyDynObject(properties);
    }

    public sealed class MyDynObject : DynamicObject
    {
        private readonly Dictionary<string, object> _properties;

        public MyDynObject(Dictionary<string, object> properties)
        {
            _properties = properties;
        }

        public override IEnumerable<string> GetDynamicMemberNames()
        {
            return _properties.Keys;
        }

        public override bool TryGetMember(GetMemberBinder binder, out object result)
        {
            if (_properties.ContainsKey(binder.Name))
            {
                result = _properties[binder.Name];
                return true;
            }
            else
            {
                result = null;
                return false;
            }
        }

        public override bool TrySetMember(SetMemberBinder binder, object value)
        {
            if (_properties.ContainsKey(binder.Name))
            {
                _properties[binder.Name] = value;
                return true;
            }
            else
            {
                return false;
            }
        }
    }
0

If you want to convert any DataTable to a equivalent IEnumerable vector function.

Please take a look at the following generic function, this may help your needs (you may need to include write cases for different datatypes based on your needs).

/// <summary>
    /// Get entities from DataTable
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="T">Type of entity</typeparam>
    /// <param name="dt">DataTable</param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public IEnumerable<T> GetEntities<T>(DataTable dt)
    {
        if (dt == null)
        {
            return null;
        }

        List<T> returnValue = new List<T>();
        List<string> typeProperties = new List<string>();

        T typeInstance = Activator.CreateInstance<T>();

        foreach (DataColumn column in dt.Columns)
        {
            var prop = typeInstance.GetType().GetProperty(column.ColumnName, BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.Public);
            if (prop != null)
            {
                typeProperties.Add(column.ColumnName);
            }
        }

        foreach (DataRow row in dt.Rows)
        {
            T entity = Activator.CreateInstance<T>();

            foreach (var propertyName in typeProperties)
            {

                if (row[propertyName] != DBNull.Value)
                {
                    string str = row[propertyName].GetType().FullName;

                    if (entity.GetType().GetProperty(propertyName).PropertyType == typeof(System.String))
                    {
                        object Val = row[propertyName].ToString();
                        entity.GetType().GetProperty(propertyName, BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.Public).SetValue(entity, Val, BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.Public, null, null, null);
                    }
                    else if (entity.GetType().GetProperty(propertyName).PropertyType == typeof(System.Guid)) 
                    {
                        object Val = Guid.Parse(row[propertyName].ToString());
                        entity.GetType().GetProperty(propertyName, BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.Public).SetValue(entity, Val, BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.Public, null, null, null);
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        entity.GetType().GetProperty(propertyName, BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.Public).SetValue(entity, row[propertyName], BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.Public, null, null, null);
                    }
                }
                else
                {
                    entity.GetType().GetProperty(propertyName, BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.Public).SetValue(entity, null, BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.Public, null, null, null);
                }
            }

            returnValue.Add(entity);
        }

        return returnValue.AsEnumerable();
    }
-3
        PagedDataSource objPage = new PagedDataSource();

        DataView dataView = listData.DefaultView;
        objPage.AllowPaging = true;
        objPage.DataSource = dataView;
        objPage.PageSize = PageSize;

        TotalPages = objPage.PageCount;

        objPage.CurrentPageIndex = CurrentPage - 1;

        //Convert PagedDataSource to DataTable
        System.Collections.IEnumerator pagedData = objPage.GetEnumerator();

        DataTable filteredData = new DataTable();
        bool flagToCopyDTStruct = false;
        while (pagedData.MoveNext())
        {
            DataRowView rowView = (DataRowView)pagedData.Current;
            if (!flagToCopyDTStruct)
            {
                filteredData = rowView.Row.Table.Clone();
                flagToCopyDTStruct = true;
            }
            filteredData.LoadDataRow(rowView.Row.ItemArray, true);
        }

        //Here is your filtered DataTable
        return filterData; 
  • 3
    Can you explain what this code even do? Is this code copied? – quantum Oct 21 '12 at 13:19
  • Can you explain what your code actually does ? – David Moorhouse Jan 13 '14 at 20:22

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.