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Having trouble with such a little problem. I'm trying to read text from a file. The file is in the form:

Jim 3 X Y Z 
James 2 A B
Alley 5 D E F G H 

Where the integers represent the number of variables that follow. I'm reading the name and the number with fscanf, then reading the char variables with fgetc so I can put them in an array. The fscanf part is working fine but I'm missing something with the fgetc.

 do {
    c = fscanf(inputFile, "%s" "%d", word, &inputSize); 
    printf("%s ", word);

    while (c!= '\n')  {
        c = fgetc(inputFile);
        printf("char is:%c ", c);
    }
}while (c != EOF);

This ends up in an infinite loop. So I tried telling when the fgetc will stop.

while (c != EOF){
    c = fscanf(inputFile, "%s" "%d", word, &inputSize); 
    printf("%s ", word);
    printf("%d ", inputSize);
    printf("\n");
    for (i =0;i<(inputSize*2);i++) {
            c = fgetc(inputFile) ;
            if (c== ' ') {
            }
            else {
                 printf("char is :%c ", c);
                 printf("\n");
            }
    }

The output becomes:

 Jim 3 
 char is :X 
 char is :Y 
 char is :Z 
 James 2 
 char is :A 
 char is :B 
 Alley 5 
 char is :D 
 char is :E 
 char is :F 
 char is :G 
 char is :H 
 Alley 5 
 char is :? 
 char is :? 
 char is :? 
 char is :? 
 char is :? 
 char is :? 
 char is :? 
 char is :? 
 char is :? 
 char is :? 

What part of the fgetc am I messing up in? Also, why is the fgetc not seeing the '\n' in my first example, but instead infinite looping?

Thanks

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  • 1
    Most probably, c is a char and not an int and you run into problems because the code can't reliably store EOF in a char. However, although you've made a moderate attempt at an MCVE (How to create a Minimal, Complete, and Verifiable Example?) this isn't quite complete. Is the data being typed or read from a file? Also, what sort of machine are you compiling on? Is plain char a signed or unsigned type? (I note in passing that the use of string concatenation in the scanf() format strings is not exactly wrong, it is unusual.) Commented Nov 26, 2015 at 1:28
  • Sorry, I am reading lines from a txt file. Compiling on a x86-64 machine. Actually had no idea if plain chars are signed or unsigned, but did a quick search and it looks like the default is signed chars on x86 compilers (which I have not changed).
    – Ab123
    Commented Nov 26, 2015 at 2:00
  • Did you declare unsigned char c; or char c;? Commented Nov 26, 2015 at 2:01
  • I have been declaring "char c".
    – Ab123
    Commented Nov 26, 2015 at 2:03

1 Answer 1

2

In the original code, you have:

char c;   // Per comments
do {
    c = fscanf(inputFile, "%s" "%d", word, &inputSize); 
    printf("%s ", word);

    while (c!= '\n')  {
        c = fgetc(inputFile);
        printf("char is:%c ", c);
    }
} while (c != EOF);

This code works correctly until after you've read the newline after Alley's data. Then you go back to the top of the loop, and read some data with fscanf(). Since there is no data, fscanf() returns EOF, but you go ahead and print what was in word and inputSize before. Then you go into an infinite loop because the fgetc() returns EOF, which is not \n, so you try again, and again, and …

Fixes:

  1. fgetc() returns an int, not a char. On a system where plain char is a signed type, this means you mistake a valid character (often ÿ, U+00FF, LATIN SMALL LETTER Y WITH DIAERESIS) for EOF. On a system where plain char is an unsigned type, nothing matches EOF. Neither behaviour is correct.
  2. Test for EOF or newline; always think about that.
  3. Test the return from fscanf(); if it isn't 2, things have gone wrong.

And I'd use a top-checking while loop rather than a bottom-checking do … while loop. There are occasions for a do … while loop; this is not, in my opinion, one of them.

The analysis for the revised code is similar. Your code is:

char c = 0;
while (c != EOF){
    c = fscanf(inputFile, "%s" "%d", word, &inputSize); 
    printf("%s ", word);
    printf("%d ", inputSize);
    printf("\n");
    for (i =0;i<(inputSize*2);i++) {
            c = fgetc(inputFile) ;
            if (c== ' ') {
            }
            else {
                 printf("char is :%c ", c);
                 printf("\n");
            }
    }
}

Again, you need to check the value returned by fscanf() and bail out of the loop if it is not 2. The first three printf() calls could be combined into one. After you read Alley's data the first time, the fscanf() returns EOF, but you ignore this and print the data again. Then you go into the fgetc() loop which gets EOF mapped to ÿ (0xFF) but this is not a blank, so you print it (by itself, 0xFF is not a valid byte in UTF-8, which may account for the question mark that's printed). When you've finished doing 10 iterations, c contains a code that expands to EOF, so the loop terminates.

Fixes:

  • Roughly the same as before.
  • Use int char;
  • Check the return from fscanf() before proceeding.
  • Check for the desired character or EOF in your fgetc() loops.

Possible fix for original code:

int c;
while (fscanf(inputFile, "%s%d", word, &inputSize) == 2)
{
    printf("%s (%d)\n", word, inputSize);

    while ((c = getc(inputFile)) != EOF && c != '\n')
    {
        if (c != ' ')
            printf("char is: %c\n", c);
    }
}
1
  • Wow, awesome thanks! Those EOF and '\n' checks pretty much solved it. But completely overlooked checking the fscanf return.
    – Ab123
    Commented Nov 26, 2015 at 2:34

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