1

I'm adapting an existing perl script proposed here: Fast alternative to grep -f

I need to filter many very large files (Map file), each ~10 million lines long x 5 fields wide using an also long list (Filter file) and print lines in the map file that match. I tried using grep -f, but it was simply taking too long. I read that this approach will be quicker.

This is what my files look like:

Filter file:

DB775P1:276:C2R0WACXX:2:1101:10000:77052
DB775P1:276:C2R0WACXX:2:1101:10003:51920
DB775P1:276:C2R0WACXX:2:1101:10004:36433
DB775P1:276:C2R0WACXX:2:1101:10004:57256

Map file:

DB775P1:276:C2R0WACXX:2:1101:10000:70401     chr5    21985760    21985780    - 
DB775P1:276:C2R0WACXX:2:1101:10000:77052     chr18   14723904    14723924    - 
DB775P1:276:C2R0WACXX:2:1101:10000:77052     chr18   14745586    14745606    - 
DB775P1:276:C2R0WACXX:2:1101:10000:77052     chr4    7944241     7944261     - 
DB775P1:276:C2R0WACXX:2:1101:10000:77052     chr4    8402856     8402876     + 
DB775P1:276:C2R0WACXX:2:1101:10000:77052     chr8    10864708    10864728    + 
DB775P1:276:C2R0WACXX:2:1101:10002:88487     chr17   5681227     5681249     - 
DB775P1:276:C2R0WACXX:2:1101:10004:74842     chr13   2569168     2569185     + 
DB775P1:276:C2R0WACXX:2:1101:10004:74842     chr14   13253418    13253435    - 
DB775P1:276:C2R0WACXX:2:1101:10004:74842     chr14   13266344    13266361    -

I expect the output lines to look like this, because they contains the string present in both the map and filter files.

DB775P1:276:C2R0WACXX:2:1101:10000:77052     chr18   14723904    14723924    - 
DB775P1:276:C2R0WACXX:2:1101:10000:77052     chr18   14745586    14745606    - 
DB775P1:276:C2R0WACXX:2:1101:10000:77052     chr4    7944241     7944261     - 
DB775P1:276:C2R0WACXX:2:1101:10000:77052     chr4    8402856     8402876     + 
DB775P1:276:C2R0WACXX:2:1101:10000:77052     chr8    10864708    10864728    + 

Here is the script as I've edited it so far, but no luck:

#!/usr/bin/env perl
use strict;
use warnings;

# Load the files
my $filter = $ARGV[0];
my $sam = $ARGV[1];
open FILE1, $filter;
   if (! open FILE1, $filter) {die "Can't open filterfile: $!";}
open FILE2, $sam;
   if (! open FILE2, $sam) {die "Can't open samfile: $!";}

# build hash of keys using lines from the filter file
my $lines;
my %keys
while (<FILE1>) {
   chomp $lines;
   %keys = $lines;
}
close FILE1;

# look up keys in the map file, if match, print line in the map file.
my $samlines;
while (<FILE2>) {
   chomp $samlines;
   my ($id, $chr, $start, $stop, $strand)  = split /\t/, $samline;
   if (defined $lines->{$id}) { print "$samline \n"; }
}
  • 2
    grep is absurdly fast. Maybe you could write something faster, but ultimately you're still reading stuff linearly from a disk. I would instead consider instead putting the data in a database. – Schwern Nov 26 '15 at 5:07
  • Yes, and typically I use grep -f for similar tasks. In fact, I've been running it while trying to troubleshoot something that will run faster. However, 24 hours later, grep -f still hasn't completed one of the jobs at hand. Trying to make a respectable attempt to come up with something speedier. – RedPandaSpaceOdyssey Nov 26 '15 at 20:57
  • 1
    It would probably be speedier to put it in a database and do the queries there. (Also, great name) I would suggest trying that approach in parallel with your own. – Schwern Nov 26 '15 at 21:36
  • The limiting factor on file IO is almost always the file IO. Doesn't really matter what tool you use - disks only spin so fast. Optimising might be doable by e.g. preloading files into memory/database/faster disk. – Sobrique Nov 27 '15 at 10:01
5

You don't seem to have made a real attempt at solving this problem yourself. The code you show won't even compile

There are a few reasons why it's not working

  • You are using file read loops with implicit control variables which read each line into $_, but you are somehow expecting data to appear in $lines and $samlines. You are also using $samline which you don't even declare

  • The line

    my %keys
    

    needs a semicolon at the end

  • I don't know what you expect to be in $lines, but assigning a scalar value to a hash like this

    %keys = $lines;
    

    will produce the warning Odd number of elements in hash assignment and leave you with a hash with only a single element

Here is a Perl program that does what I believe you intended, but I can't say whether it will be significantly faster than command_line grep. Note that I have used the autodie pragma instead of explicitly testing the status of each file IO operation

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;
use v5.10.1;
use autodie;

my ($filter_f, $sam_f) = @ARGV;

my %filter;

{
    open my $fh, '<', $filter_f;

    while ( <$fh> ) {
        $filter{$1} = 1 if /(\S+)/;
    }
}

open my $fh, '<', $sam_f;

while ( <$fh> ) {
    print if /(\S+)/ and $filter{$1};
}

output

DB775P1:276:C2R0WACXX:2:1101:10000:77052     chr18   14723904    14723924    -
DB775P1:276:C2R0WACXX:2:1101:10000:77052     chr18   14745586    14745606    -
DB775P1:276:C2R0WACXX:2:1101:10000:77052     chr4    7944241     7944261     -
DB775P1:276:C2R0WACXX:2:1101:10000:77052     chr4    8402856     8402876     +
DB775P1:276:C2R0WACXX:2:1101:10000:77052     chr8    10864708    10864728    +
  • Thanks a bunch for this! In my defense, it's the first time I've ever tried to write anything in Perl. Ever. – RedPandaSpaceOdyssey Nov 26 '15 at 21:00
  • The code works swell on the test data, but when i run it on the full files, I get: 'perl: warning: Falling back to the standard locale ("C"). Out of memory! Out of memory! perl: warning: Setting locale failed. perl: warning: Please check that your locale settings: LANGUAGE = (unset), LC_ALL = (unset), LANG = "en_US.UTF-8" are supported and installed on your system. – RedPandaSpaceOdyssey Nov 26 '15 at 21:14
  • 1
    @RedPandaSpaceOdyssey How big is that filter file? – Schwern Nov 26 '15 at 21:37
  • There are 48 map files with one filter file for each. The filter files range from 6.9 to 31M, and the map files range from 400M to 3.5G. – RedPandaSpaceOdyssey Nov 29 '15 at 5:09
  • Then I don't see how your program can be producing an Out of memory! error. The filter hash should take up no more than about 300MB, and the map file is being read one line at a time. Have you written something different from my solution? – Borodin Nov 30 '15 at 23:35
0

So, Borodin's proposed script does in fact work. However, I found that my files were too large for it to complete. Instead, I sorted both files using 'sort' and then followed that up with join.

join -1 1 -2 1 filter.file map.file > filtered.map

For each of the 48 jobs, I reserved 16G of RAM and 8 processors.

Thank you everyone for your help with this!

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